Lost Cities of South America (Lost Cities Series)
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on July 6, 2015
I love this book. Thanks.
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on May 15, 2015
AAAAAAAAA
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on March 26, 2015
loved it
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on December 25, 2014
Fun book to read. Interesting ideas to learn about.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on November 6, 2013
Childress is a man after my own heart---roaming the world by the seat of his pants--tracking down rumors, myths and historical assertions--unencumbered by convention and preconceptions--through remote jungles, across ageless mountain systems and desert regions--blowing like a fall leaf in the wind to wherever clues, hearsay, archeological evidence and intuition takes him. Should he call himself a rogue archeologist when he is without formal training, is his perogative, for his travels give him as much credibility as any diploma.

I pay men such as this as much heed as any other for I am one myself--much the same as Childress--an intense curiosity for ancient history and mans' origins and development, not without scientific background. In my series, "And There I Was" by DH Koester I travel the world in search of the same things and constantly marvel at how little man really knows and how much of what he thinks he knows he doesn't know at all.

My first journey took me to South America and the Andes where I explored the three distinct cultures there; the high altitude spine, the Selva of the Eastern slopes and the arid deserts of the Western slopes. Around every bend in the road, on every mountaintop, everywhere amidst the jungle vines, and buried beneath the desert sands, were wonders and mysteries that had me constantly shaking my head in excitement and amazement.

Before embarking on my South American sojourn I read every book on the subject I could get my hands on. This book happened to be one of them and its pages stoked the flames of my curiosity to the point where I could barely restrain myself from running down to the airport and jumping on the first plane leaving for South America. Like a starving man,I gobbled up the stories of such explorers as Colonel Percy Fawcett and The Lost Mines of Muribeca, Explorer Gene Savoy and Gran Vilaya, Karl Brugger and The Chronicle of Akakor.

Childress' book gave me the kick in the pants I needed to finally realize my dream of South America. And once I got there I found it all as he had described--Legendary cities and extensive tunnel systems built underground, fabulous cities buried beneath the sands of time and jungle undergrowth--atop every one of a thousand mountain peaks, incredible networks of aquaducts, stories and evidence of civilizations of blue-eyed whitemen--from 9000 years past--giants eight feet tall that still walked the earth when Spanish exploreres landed on South American shores and chronicled their existence.
The entire continent is an archeologists' and anthropologists' dream from where, once visited, one can never return home.

"Bravo" for Childress!!

DH Koester--"And There I Was" And There I Was, Volume I: A Backpacking Adventure In Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia
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on November 7, 2012
I read this looking for more information on the various sites but was greatly disappointed. There is some description of several sites along with a lot of wild speculation and questionable history. About a third way through the book changes into an wandering very stupid hitch hiking travelogue of South America. Describing how he got lucky with a girl in a bar is not a monumental event.
A sorry waste of time and money.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on January 4, 2011
The Lost Cities series by David Hatcher Childress has proven for me to be probably the most entertaining, thoroughly informative, and thought provoking series of books I have ever read and have also served as an invaluable road map for my own travels around the world in search of ancient mysteries. I have traveled, so far, to several locations in Egypt, Malta, Europe, Asia, Central and South America and each time I have used his books to plan my route and have taken whichever one I needed for the journey as a guide. I bought the whole series long ago and they are generally beat to hell if not falling apart at this point and I wouldn't have them any other way. Reading this series made me make up my mind that I could never be satisfied being a spectator of the debate, but the only way to truly know these mysteries was to be a participant and see them for myself. At the very least this series should inspire you to get out there, live your life as a traveler and not a tourist and go see these places for yourself. Save the money, do it cheap, whatever you have to do, but don't let the opportunity to actually go there pass you by in this life.

Equal parts detective story, travel guide, diary, history book, and compendium of esoteric knowledge; what makes these books so unique, among other things, is that Childress takes the reader with him through every step of the journey -cold beers, missed trains, broken legs, chance encounters, stolen wallets, one night stands in far away places, wishing you could stay but knowing you can't. All the while on the trail of an ever growing mystery with every answer leaving only more questions spurring you on to the next stop wondering what will happen next. One thing I always respected about Childress in these books, which some may not get the point, is that while at times he does present off-beat esoteric ideas about lost civilizations, it is done so not to promote any particular idea, but rather to give a greater context of the history of the literature of the last few hundred years concerning lost civilizations in the hope that something worthwhile might be gleaned from even the most outlandish or dated of source. To him it is a journey and to his credit does little to leave any stone unturned. But also unique to Childress compared with other writers of the genre is that other than the obvious general idea that there is much more to the story of history than we know, he rarely takes a definitive stance on any pet theory, but rather presents the information with more of a sense of wonder and openness and is really not trying to sell the reader on anything either way other than the necessity to keep an open mind. All just interesting to know and he leaves the reader to think of it what they will which is refreshing.

All and all very interesting and entertaining and I highly recommend getting the whole series. The Lost Cities series are true classics of the genre and should be a front and center addition to any alternative researchers library and as a whole are an unparalleled source of of information about many megalithic sites and discoveries you will be hard pressed to find anywhere else. Hopefully they will inspire you as they did me.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on February 17, 2010
This book is about the personal experiences of the author in travelling through South America. The author writes in an interesting and informative style and provides valuable information about the sites he visited. Having travelled to some of the sites he describes, I can say that his information is very accurate. He at least did some investigation into the sites he described. Because of his descxription of some of the sites I have not visited, he has encouraged me to make another trip to South America. I was, however, put off by the descriptions of his casual personal sexual trysts in various cities that could have been left out, as well as his descriptions of his other personal activites.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on December 5, 2009
While first published in 1986, Childress' book is still a decent compendium of the lost civilizations and legends of South America. As with all in this series, the author uses his travels as a reason to recount and excerpt the tales and legends of others who went before him. He visits some of these locations, but mostly those accessible to all tourists. He's not actually an archaeologist or an Indian Jones type, but like all these books, he allows readers to travel to distant lands as he distills what he has discovered in his studies. He doesn't latch on to strange theories here as much as in some of his other books. Much of interest is revealed such as tunnel systems, potential locations of King Solomon's mines and the disappearance of Colonel Percy Harrison Fawcett. You can read more about Fawcett in the excellent The Lost City of Z: A Tale of Deadly Obsession in the Amazon. See also Mysteries of Ancient South America.
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
I had several issues with this book:
1. His writing is spine-tingling horrendous. The grammatical errors, typos, etc. litter the entire page. Pick a page from the book -- I promise you'll find an error.
2. The title of this book makes me laugh hysterically, because that is hardly what the book is about. Basically, the book was this continuous cycle of hitch hiking, meeting someone, finding a hotel (and listing all hotels and prices in that area), getting plastered, and having sex. The way he writes about the lost cities is just plain... well, corny. He'll start out talking about the beer in a certain city and then "suddenly" recall this article he read about the lost city close to there. Considering he doesn't even visit a majority of these cities, I hardly believe he's truly thinking about them while hammering down drinks.
3. HE DOESN'T EVEN GO TO MOST OF THE "LOST" CITIES. This, above all problems, is absolutely unexcuseable. He talks about them, yes. Visit them? No. I would say 40% of the book is talking about various articles and arguments he has read ABOUT the cities. While this is very helpful and interesting, I picked up the book to read about treks into the jungle looking for these lost cities -- not to read what other people have said about them. About 10% of the book consists of him actually at the lost cities, which even then, it's not his own thoughts, but his interpretations of other writers'/adventurers' arguments. The other 50% of the book consists of him hitch-hiking, having sex, getting drunk, getting mugged, talking about hotels (Because I care about the price of a run down hostel in some unheard of town of South America in the 1980's), and asking ignorant nobodies about their views of the lost cities.

This book is a waste of time, I assure you. Unless you are looking for a book about some middle aged guy going broke and hitch-hiking, while talking about hotels in a horrific writing style, I would stay far from this book. If you want an excellent adventure/non-fiction that's actually looking for lost cities and writing from his own perspective, check out Exploration Fawcett.
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