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Citizen Dick Paperback – January 31, 2010


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Paperback, January 31, 2010
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 390 pages
  • Publisher: PeyBro Books, LLC (January 31, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0981939309
  • ISBN-13: 978-0981939308
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.3 x 8.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,787,889 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Richard Arneson’s thirteen years working in corporate America drove him up a tree -- literally. Once he escaped the telecommunications industry after ten years of service, he built a tree house -- ostensibly for his two young sons -- installed electricity and cable TV, and set out to fix himself, deciding that dealing with the memories of working in the goofy-as-hell world of corporate America could only be accomplished by getting them down on paper. Citizen Dick is the result.

Arneson is currently working on his next novel, The Tree House, which, ironically, is not being written in his tree house but in the cab of his 1950 Chevy pickup truck. He lives in Dallas, Texas with his wife and their two sons. He has plans to build a second story on his tree house in early 2010, one large enough to accommodate a baby grand piano and two dental chairs.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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See all 20 customer reviews
Should be good for at least 50 pages!
Daniel M. Hatton
The writing is surprisingly good, descriptive and good use of dialogue to set up the characters.
Mark P. McDonald
There is a theme of corporate greed in the novel.
Robert G Yokoyama

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Retired Reader on March 22, 2010
This is not a traditional novel and it is not for every one. Its main protagonist is a slacker and by most conventional standards a loser named Dick Citizen ("Citizen Dick"). Its plot line is so thin as to be almost non-existent at times. It begins almost as two novels and only over time merges into a single thread. Finally be warned much of its humor is scatological in nature. Yet in the end it may well be one of the best and most acute novels written on the upper management and operations of mega-corporations in 21st Century America.
This novel examines in often excruciating detail the personalities and foibles of the men and women who constitute the executive ranks of "the third largest" telecommunications firm in the U.S., yet clearly know nothing about telecommunications. The only remotely sympathetic figure among this group besides Citizen Dick is a Mexican-Chinese technocrat who alone among the senior managers actually knows what he is doing. Citizen Dick is hired on board as part of the corporate public relations staff, an amazing commentary on corporate hiring practices in itself, and presents an all too accurate picture of how new folks are indoctrinated into big corporations. In one of this novel's many sidebars incidentally it presents a devastating description of the corporate marketing division and marketing strategies or rather lack of them. Perhaps the central lesson of this book is its description of how the most senior managers of this corporation, and especially the hirsute CEO Noble Tud, care nothing for its corporate products, its customers, or even its profit margin. They consumed and concerned only in the market value of its stock as measured in quarterly increments.
As with all novels about corporate America the reader might well ask how accurate is its description of ill-formed, greedy, and downright incompetent senior corporate managers? Well this reviewer doesn't know, but was immensely entertained by the book anyway.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Living Well Dallas on April 16, 2010
Besides being laugh out loud funny, "Citizen Dick" speaks to the heart of any man or woman who has spent time in Corporate America and survived with their sense of humor and integrity in check. In an almost Jungian fashion, Arneson describes the archetypes of Corporate America so well, so shamelessly and so thoroughly, you will recognize your boss, your colleagues and perhaps perhaps even a little of yourself in his colorful cast of characters. Arneson takes his time developing the characters, which for readers who want a thrill a minute may find painful, but the end result is a knowledge so intimate of each character you could literally recognize them on the street. This is the kind of book you think about when you have to put it down and look forward to getting back to. The fact that the author dedicated the book to a surly cast of corporate crooks (i.e., Bernie Madoff, Bernard Ebbers, Kenneth Lay, etc.) endeared him to me. Arneson's dry wit and humor transcends every page of this book. I highly recommend it! I can't wait for his next novel.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Mark P. McDonald TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on March 29, 2010
Citizen Dick is Richard Arneson's funny, ironic, irreverent, undisciplined, sarcastic, farcical, vindictive, cruel, funny, moronic, stereotypical, enjoyable and many other things all at the same time. This is a book that could only be self-published as it is raw and dripping with contempt that the author has for his former employers in the telecommunications industry. I was asked to review the book by its publicist and for some reason I agreed and I am glad that I did because it is an entertaining and irreverent novel.

First here is a review on its technical merits as a book. The writing is surprisingly good, descriptive and good use of dialogue to set up the characters. From a structural standpoint it's a nightmare with characters coming in and out of the story haphazardly without apparent reason other than either to make a quick point or to embarrass a character or parody a person from the author's previous life. This is a good proto book but it would need a real editor and developmental work as it lacks a clear plot, purpose and reason to read it other than watching the author pour out their sardonic wit.

The book is the mythical and semi-autobiographical journey of Dick Citizen a reluctant soul from the trailer parks of Texas to the heights of corporate power. As you can imagine the book is filled with caricatures and parodies of corporate life. It's a kind of Office Space (the movie), meets Wall Street, meets the Simpsons with a good dose of bathroom humor. In this regard the book is a fun read, particularly for the first 200 pages. After that the author loses their way, the storyline - what there is - breaks down and the book becomes uninteresting as the author tries to tie up all the lose knots and shows the books weak points.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Bob Schmidt on April 5, 2010
Citizen Dick is a wildly entertaining, scholastically accurate novel of the craziness and tomfoolery of the telecom world in the 1980s. Mr. Arneson brings the characters to life with brilliant, yet nausiating clarity. Witness the CEO who has his overpaid underworked staff assitant shave the gorilla hair from his back as an event on his outlook calendar. Or the CFO with Irritable Bowell SYndrome who once made legend of the mens room at CommGlobalTeleVista.

Anyone who can blend Golf, Meat, and Telecom into a book this entertaining must be given an ovation and a plea for an encore! Well done!
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