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Citizen Indians: Native American Intellectuals, Race, and Reform Hardcover – April, 2005


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 205 pages
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press (April 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801443547
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801443541
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.2 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,795,709 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Maddox's book . . . demonstrates that Native Americans were actively engaged in trying to create a place for themselves as both Indians and Americans during the Progressive era, and in doing so she has filled in some . . . missing pages in our national textbook."—Steve Conn, American Historical Review, April 2006

"Lucy Maddox describes the efforts of Native intellectuals to transform the public's conception of the Indian. She centers her discussion around the Society of American Indians (SAI), a group of diverse Native activists who held disparate views on how Indian people ought to accommodate and contest majority conceptualizations. . . . Some have contended that the SAI's efforts were futile, and they point to the dated stereotypes that remain embedded in American culture. To a considerable extent, Maddox disagrees with this argument in her excellent work. . . . Perhaps more important, Maddox adds in her conclusion, is the fact that American Indian thinkers of the Progressive era paved the way for their intellectual descendants' exploration and experimentation in the 1960s and 1970s."—Tim Alan Garrison, North Carolina Historical Review, January 2008

"Lucy Maddox's Citizen Indians brings to life the active work done by Native American intellectuals on behalf of uplift, progressive reform, of universally conceived Indian rights as well as specific tribal concerns. Focusing on the Society of American Indians (SAI) and a broad range of figures including Chief Simon Pokagon, Daniel La France, Gertrude Bonnin, and Luther Standing Bear, Maddox redraws American intellectual history of the period that witnessed widespread discussions of 'the Indian problem' and of assimilation as well as the quest for cultural and political sovereignty."—Werner Sollors, Harvard University

"A brilliant account of the issues and constraints confronting the first generation of modern pan-Indian intellectuals, Citizen Indians stands at the forefront of a long-overdue reassessment of the cultural productions and political efforts of Native people during the first half of the twentieth century. Unraveling the complex dynamics underpinning Indian performances, Lucy Maddox places Native people at the center of a national conversation, forcing readers to reconsider familiar histories of race and politics in the United States."—Philip J. Deloria, University of Michigan

"Citizen Indians is a highly sophisticated book about American Indian intellectuals in the Progressive Era. Lucy Maddox presents a complete, informed study of American Indian writers of the period and the social and political contexts in which they did their work. Maddox writes well, has done very careful and painstaking research, and is effective in making the case she does for understanding the complexities and particularities of Native America and Native American writers of the turn of the twentieth century."—Robert Warrior, University of Oklahoma

"Citizen Indians is a major contribution to our understanding of how American Indian intellectuals turned stereotypes and political subjugation to their own purpose, promoting autonomy through reform and redefining the grounds for their participation in the nation's social and cultural life."—Eric J. Sundquist, UCLA Foundation Professor of Literature, UCLA

"In this engaging and well-written account of the rise of a certain kind of Indian public intellectual in the United States at the turn of the twentieth century, Lucy Maddox shows how a fundamental dilemma of political representation inspired creative solutions and a powerful social and political critique. The efforts of Indian intellectuals and activists to fashion a critical voice as well as a politics of race and reform framed in their own terms remain controversial to this day. Maddox documents those efforts and shows how the pressure of Native critique—and the anxiety it generated in Anglo culture'shaped both the Indian reform movement and the culture that had sought to absorb it."—Priscilla Wald, Duke University --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

From the Inside Flap

"Lucy Maddox’s Citizen Indians brings to life the active work done by Native American intellectuals on behalf of uplift, progressive reform, of universally conceived Indian rights as well as specific tribal concerns. Focusing on the Society of American Indians (SAI) and a broad range of figures including Chief Simon Pokagon, Daniel La France, Gertrude Bonnin, and Luther Standing Bear, Maddox redraws American intellectual history of the period that witnessed widespread discussions of ‘the Indian problem’ and of assimilation as well as the quest for cultural and political sovereignty."—Werner Sollors, Harvard University

"A brilliant account of the issues and constraints confronting the first generation of modern pan-Indian intellectuals, Citizen Indians stands at the forefront of a long-overdue reassessment of the cultural productions and political efforts of Native people during the first half of the twentieth century. Unraveling the complex dynamics underpinning Indian performances, Lucy Maddox places Native people at the center of a national conversation, forcing readers to reconsider familiar histories of race and politics in the United States."—Philip J. Deloria, University of Michigan

"In this engaging and well-written account of the rise of a certain kind of Indian public intellectual in the United States at the turn of the twentieth century, Lucy Maddox shows how a fundamental dilemma of political representation inspired creative solutions and a powerful social and political critique. The efforts of Indian intellectuals and activists to fashion a critical voice as well as a politics of race and reform framed in their own terms remain controversial to this day. Maddox documents those efforts and shows how the pressure of Native critique—and the anxiety it generated in Anglo culture—shaped both the Indian reform movement and the culture that had sought to absorb it."—Priscilla Wald, Duke University


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