City of Dreadful Night (The Brighton Trilogy) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

City of Dreadful Night (Brighton Trilogy) Paperback – June 1, 2011


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$29.99 $1.08
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Introducing The Amazon Book Review, our editors' fresh new blog featuring interviews with authors, book reviews, quirky essays on book trends, and regular columns by our editors. Explore now
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Series: Brighton Trilogy
  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Severn House Publishers (June 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1847512763
  • ISBN-13: 978-1847512765
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.8 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,389,720 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In a botched effort to arrest a violent armed robber, police officers under the command of Chief Constable Robert Watts raid the wrong house and gun down four people at the outset of the strong first in British author Guttridge's Brighton trilogy. Watts publicly defends his officers, but pressure escalates for him to step down. His troubled marriage collapses after the press learns that he had an affair with Det. Sgt. Sarah Gilchrist, one of the members of the assault team. When long-lost papers surface relating to an unsolved 1934 case in which a woman's body parts were found in luggage left at railway stations, Watts ends up assisting a reporter who reopens the case. Despite a major coincidence that connects the two plot lines, Guttridge (Two to Tango) successfully pulls readers in, and many will be eager to pick up the dangling plot threads in the second book. (Dec.) (c)
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Booklist

An armed house arrest in Brighton goes horribly wrong, and Chief Constable Robert Watts’ career is on the line. Four people were killed in the operation (including a pregnant woman), and the operational commander committed suicide soon after. Watts is told to resign by his old friend, government fixer William Simpson. And when word leaks about Watts’ previous one-night stand with DC Sarah Gilchrist, who was in on the bungled arrest, both his job and his marriage are in tatters. As he enlists the help of security advisor James Tingley to get revenge for what he thinks was a setup, Watts also looks into a bizarre, unsolved murder case from 1934, investigated at the time by both his father and Simpson’s. This first of the projected Brighton trilogy leaves most of the answers about murders past and present decidedly up in the air. However, Guttridge has created a fine cast of fallible characters, and readers who can handle ambiguity—and are willing to wait for resolution through two more books—are likely to be amply rewarded. --Michele Leber --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By William Gallagher on October 21, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I came to Peter Guttridge through his very, very funny Nick Madrid crime novels. But he threw in a suddenly serious chapter into Foiled Again. It worked tremendously well making the jokes either side somehow seem that much more pointed but it was also just completely engrossing. Since then I've wanted to see what he could do with a full-length, serious novel.

He hasn't ditched the jokes entirely, you suspect that wit is never far away and even the dedication is wry with a barbed undertow, but I was right to wait for it: City of Dreadful Night is absorbing, commanding, engrossing.

I'm not sure now that I realised it was the first of a trilogy. Now I've read it, that's excellent news: suddenly I'm back to waiting for the next Peter Guttridge novel.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Katherine A. Ackley on July 10, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This novel represents a change from previous Guttridge novels and I welcome the change. Whereas the Nick Madrid novels were funny and well written, this one is serious but no less well written. No jokes or plays on words (except occasionally, as in "the 'trunk' murders") but superb description, wonderful character development, and skillful shift from third to first person, which I usually don't like. He also carries off the handling of parallel time periods in a very clever way. Highest marks to Guttridge for this novel. I look forward to reading the others in this trilogy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By E. Crowley VINE VOICE on March 16, 2011
Format: Hardcover
"City of Dreadful Night" is the title of a poem written by Scottish poet, James Thomson. He began writing the poem in 1870 and finished it three years later. It is the work of a man who is a pessimist, a man who sees little, if anything, positive about the world around him. The city of the poem is London as viewed by a man who has lost his faith and is unable to go beyond his own melancholy to look at the life around him.

The poem is available on Wikipedia and, in the comments about the poem, George Saintsbury, a literary critic of his day, wrote "what saves Thomson is the perfection with which he expresses the negative and hopeless side of the sense of mystery...."

Most mystery fanatics want resolutions for the problems that are thrown at the characters especially when most of the characters are likeable. Robert Watts, chief constable, Sarah Gilchrist, sergeant in the police, Kate Simpson, radio journalist, and James Tingley are decent people in their own ways. Resolutions do not come easily in CITY OF DREADFUL NIGHT.

In this book , the city is Brighton, long a destination for those seeking the sea, entertainment, and escape. The book begins with news reports of the discovery of the torso of a woman's body in a trunk in the Left Luggage area of Brighton Central Railway Station. The legs are discovered at the King's Cross Station Luggage Office. It is July, 1934.

The Milldean housing estate in Brighton was a dangerous place for anyone. On a hot afternoon, members of the Brighton police force are ready for an assault on one of the residences. "Information was received from an impeccable source.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This novel looks at original sin and the descent into sociopathic madness as the younger Hathaway works his way into his father's crime organization. Who knew that psychopaths get sucked deeper into their aberrant ways with a little help from family? Lots of characters, many overlapping plots, all fully developed. Read the trilogy in order.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By B. Calvo on September 9, 2013
Format: Hardcover
This crime novel, the first of a trilogy, started out well, with a police raid gone mysteriously bad and the officer in charge made to resign. From there,it was all downhill. You've got your government and police corruption, endless repetitive dialogue between shopworn stock characters (I stopped counting at 60 of them.), 1st person alternating with 3rd person narratives, diary excerpts, plenty of gruesome murder porn, vomit, generational skullduggery, slimy sex talk, and more, all packed into 243 pages of large print. I'd give it a miss if I were you...I wish I had.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.