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City I Love Hardcover – April 1, 2009


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Harry N. Abrams; Library Binding edition (April 1, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0810983273
  • ISBN-13: 978-0810983274
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 8.7 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #907,720 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Starred Review. Kindergarten-Grade 6—A backpack-toting, humble hound with wanderlust and a winged companion tour several of the world's cities. Hopkins's 18 poems observe skyscrapers, hot-dog vendors, subways, taxis, bridges, bright lights, and the diversity of people and pigeons. Most of the poems span a fully illustrated spread, and youngsters will have fun finding the dog and bird on each one. Hopkins honors children's lyrical sense of music ("Sing a song of cities/if you do,/Cities will sing back/to you") and earnest astonishment ("Look!/Up there!/High up there/where/men and women/building the new skyscraper/balance on beams/dangle on derricks/glide on girders…Wondrous!"). In Paris, a mother pigeon pleads with the traffic to be quiet: "Please/city/have/some/pity./Promise me/not/ one/more/beep?/My newborn/pigeons/need/their/sleep." These polished poems are equally matched by Hall's graphic-style cartoons, which offer many added layers of narrative delight as well as beautiful colors and an eye-catching sense of design. The watercolor endpapers show a map with major cities highlighted in the poems. The illustrations have a cosmopolitan look, a little French with a splash of nostalgia. They are filled with construction-buildings, bridges, pyramids-a kind of hats-off to the magnificence of the world. This book is really special, a global tour de force.—Teresa Pfeifer, Alfred Zanetti Montessori Magnet School, Springfield, MA
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From Booklist

Hopkins’ clear, lively poems celebrate the diversity and connections of urban life, and on each double-page spread, New Yorker magazine illustrator Hall extends the words with vibrantly colored cartoon drawings. Though no places are specifically named, a clear world map on the endpapers shows 18 cities, one for each poem, and the pictures show a traveling dog with a backpack visiting particular places across the globe. Kids will enjoy identifying the famous locations, from the Eiffel Tower in Paris to the pyramid in the distance in Cairo, but the focus is on the joy of urban life: lights, skyscrapers, hydrants, taxis, music, noise. One of the best poems is “Subways Are People” (“people always on the go / Racing, running, rushing people / People I will never know”), that zeros in on the fun of crowds, of anonymity, “races of faces,” and busy streets everywhere. Grades 2-4. --Hazel Rochman

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kirsten G. Cutler on April 3, 2009
Format: Hardcover
This is a wonderful collection of poems that promote a multicultural appreciation of large cities from around the globe. There is a great picture of a gondola floating on a canal, a dog is a passenger, his one paw trailing over the side of the boat; people are sitting at a "caffe" and a tourist couple stand gawking as the boat passes by. The accompanying poem reads, "I wonder whether pouring roaring gushing rushing water spouting from our corner hydrant flows from here- goes so far- to cause lazy Venetian gondolas to bob and float as easily as our homemade wooden-popsicle-boat." Another poem honors the acrobatic skill of people who hang perilously off buildings they are helping to construct, "Why, it's like watching a razzle-dazzle razzmatazz three-ring steel circus performance appearing in the sky". This is a perfect book for sharing with an elementary school audience.
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Format: Hardcover
A hound dog is sitting on the Chrysler building overlooking Manhattan. He's got a backpack strapped to his back and he's ready to travel the world to visit many cities. New York is a good start but he's planning on visiting many because he's a city dog at heart. What cities would you like to visit? The little hound dog's curiosity will take him to San Francisco, Chicago, St. Louis, Mexico City, Toronto, Washington, D.C., New Orleans, Rio De Janeiro, London, Paris, Venice, Cairo, Moscow, Johannesburg, Delhi Tokyo and Shanghai. Get ready to travel the world with this little city dog on a bow WOW trip!

SING A SONG OF CITIES

Sing a song of cities.
If you do,
Cities will sing back
to you.

They'll sing in subway roars and rumbles,
People-laughs, machine-loud grumbles.

Sing a song of cities.
If you do,
Cities will sing back.

Cities will sing back
to you.

This is a fascinating and fun whirlwind tour of some of the largest, most vibrant cities in the world. Some people are country folk at heart, but an equal number are in love with the city. The poems were captivating and along with the vibrant artwork they made this bustling work come to life. If you're a city gal or guy and would like to impart your love of it to a youngster, you're going to have to add this book to your list!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Bird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on June 25, 2009
Format: Hardcover
It's funny to think that in the past most American kids lived on farms, yes? Nowadays the bulk of young `uns have at least a passing familiarity with big city life, even if they don't live there themselves. So I sit and stare at this picture book collection of city-based poems and I think about it. What audience are we reaching out to here? Are there kids enthralled by bright lights, big cities? Do they wonder about far away places, and are willing to take a trip there, albeit a roundabout one via poetry? It's times like these that, as a children's librarian, I need to remember that not every book written for kids needs to fill a specific niche. I'm so used to answering reference questions that sometimes I forget that books like "City I Love" by Lee Bennett Hopkins are written to expand young minds, not limit them to what they already know. It's a strange little collection, but strange isn't bad. It's just different. So if you've space on your shelves for the "different" out there, this should probably suit you just fine.

Over the years poet Lee Bennett Hopkins has written a variety of poems that, one way or another, refer to urban living. From 1971's "Subways Are People" (a bold statement from 1971, I'd like to add) to the 2002 "City I Love", Hopkins has repeatedly given voice to the good and bad of urban living. Now eighteen of these poems have been collected. Set against a backdrop illustrated by Marcellus Hall, we see each poem take place in a different major city. "Get `em Here" shows a hot dog seller in D.C. "Snow City", appropriately, takes place in Toronto.
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By ck1199 on July 28, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My three year old son loves this book of poetry, and so do I! It is a wonderful way to introduce young children to poetry and is really enjoyable for adults as well. It is a great buy and a unique addition to a child's library.
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Format: Hardcover
Young readers will catch the travel bug after reading this light collection of short poems about cities. Although the poems do not rhyme, the words create an image to match the topic as in the poem "Kite" where the kite "flitters, twirls, tumbles, twitters". The words do not rhyme but instead give a visual of the kite floating in the air. Another technique the author uses to create imagery in the poems is how the poem is set up. In the poem "Snow City", the word down is written in falling text to symbolize the falling flake.
Each poem about the city could apply to any city in the world, but what makes each poem unique is its illustration. The pictures are drawn in an almost cartoonish way with vivid but not bring colors. The pictures take the words to different places around the world: San Francisco, Japan, France, London, Mexico, and New York City. Adding the different countries to the words takes the reader out of their own city and takes them around the world. What unifies the poems is the hound that is visiting each place with his backpack. Students will enjoy looking for him on each page.
Beginning as early as kindergarten, students are taught the difference between cities, towns, suburbs, and rural areas. This book supplements this curriculum, especially the first poem "Sing a Song of Cities" which asks the reader to sing to the city to hear what the city will sing back. "They'll sing in subway roars and rumbles, People-laughs, machine-loud grumbles". Students can discuss what sounds they hear in the city and then compare it to what they may hear in a rural country area. This enhances the state standards of knowing the difference between the country and the city by adding what the different sounds and smells they may find in the city and country.

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