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City of Pillars Paperback – December 1, 2000

18 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"[T]akes the hoary plot device of an innocent haunted by murderous operatives to delirious new heights" -- Brutarian Magazine, Fall 2001

About the Author

The name 'Dominic Peloso' has a Kabbalistic value of 284.

Despite being very well rounded, he is usually obtuse and is rather pointed despite not being too sharp. He holds MS degrees in Nuclear Physics, Environmental Engineering, and Biochemistry. He knows how to build a nuclear weapon, and has taught classes in the subject at the Joint Military Intelligence College. Due to what can only be attributed to a clerical error, he has been allowed to freely roam the halls of the Pentagon, CIA, NSA, and a few places that don't even officially exist. He is currently developing environmentally friendly ways to dispose of chemical weapons left over from the Cold War. Besides writing subversive novels, his hobbies include; esoteric gnostic religions, hermeticism, tribal art, ethical philosophy, particle physics, environmental extremism, 20th century literature, feng shui, international politics, '80s dreampop, and several other things that absolutely no one else seems to be interested in. Although he sometimes wears black, he adamantly denies being affiliated in any way with the Knights Templar, Illuminati, or the Rosicrucians.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 222 pages
  • Publisher: Invisible College Press (December 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1931468001
  • ISBN-13: 978-1931468008
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.5 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,432,262 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Dominic Peloso worked for over ten years as a bioterrorism and policy analyst for the U.S. government. He no longer does this. Now he lives in Alaska, but in the rainy part, not the cold part.

First World Problems in an Age of Terrorism and Ennui is his third prose novel and was published by Dark Mountain Books. His first novel, City of Pillars, and his second novel, Adopted Son are available from The Invisible College Press.

He is also the author of a depressing mixed-media comicstrip-esque photography project called Tiny Ghosts, which is found at: www.tinyghosts.com

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 8, 2001
Format: Paperback
Reading this book makes you feel like you've been running a race, but it is more than a typical 'action adventure'. Mr. Peloso has spent a considerable amount of effort drawing together diverse spiritual and historical subjects such as the Kaballah, Rosicrucianism, and the Qur'an, and fused them with well-known 'mythology' subjects such as the Men in Black and the origin of the Pyramids in Egypt. In addition to the action and 'mythology', the novel is filled with biting social and political commentary about the complacency and materialism of modern society. Overall, City of Pillars reads like a mix of The Celestine Prophecy and Fight Club, and could easily become an underground classic.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 13, 2001
Format: Paperback
City of Pillars is about a man who discovers an anceint manuscript, only to have people attempt to kill him for it. This is reminiscent of Eric Ambler's work, where a common person gets caught up in something larger than himself. It is unlike Ambler's, in that the main character is not able to remain unaffected; his principals and personality change.
The book is sort of a cross between the Prisoner (the television show by Patrick McGoohan), Diary of a Madman, and some of Hume's and Kant's philosophies. In between some good action sequences (I especially like a scene of panic at the beginning) is some biting commentary on our society.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Charles A. Ray on March 22, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Mitchell Sinclair is an up and coming young lawyer. He has a good house in Marin County, north of San Francisco, a trophy wife, Sarah, and a shiny black 1958 Cadillac Sedan. He's living what one would describe as `the good life,' until one day, while crossing the Golden Gate Bridge on the way to his law firm, a strange toll booth collector tosses an even stranger package into his car.
The package contains a sheaf of documents written in strange languages, and as Sinclair struggles to translate them, his life is turned inside out and upside down. This `chance' happening - or, so it seems at first - sets him on a journey that spans the globe, from San Francisco to Macchu Pichu in Peru; but, even more importantly, a journey into his own tortured consciousness. As he flees the mysterious `men in black,' Sinclair finds himself at times doubting his own sanity - or insanity.
While it is often thought that a thriller needs lots of dialogue in order to be truly effective, Dominic Peloso, in City of Pillars, shows the beauty of narrative. He deftly puts the reader inside Mitchell Sinclair's head; for, this is his story. It's difficult to pigeon hole City of Pillars. It's part thriller, part science fiction; with a lot of philosophy thrown in for good measure. This is the kind of story you won't want to put down; which you, in fact, can't put down. Highly recommended reading for that next long flight when the in-flight movies are boring, or for curling up over a long weekend. A definite five-star story that anyone can appreciate.

The White Dragons
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Stefan Isaksson on August 9, 2006
Format: Paperback
It was a day just like any other day in Abraham Mitchell Sinclair's life. After saying goodbye to his perfectly beautiful wife he left his perfectly beautiful house in his new black 1958 Cadillac Sedan and started the drive to his work at the law firm in San Francisco where he was on his way to becoming partner. A few more years of hard work, and the life he and his wife had would be even more perfect.

But whoever said happiness lasts forever? In Sinclair's case it ends when he gets to the Golden Gate Bridge. Stuck in the usual morning traffic rush-hour he suddenly spots an open spot in the line of cars next to him, and fast as lightning he drives there; right in front of another black 1958 Cadillac Sedan. Then when it becomes his turn to pay the man in the tollbooth he discovers a strange Man in Black standing there, who without a word throws him a mysterious package. But being the busy man that he is, Sinclair doesn't care too much about the unexpected gift.

Which soon will change, quite drastically. Because as soon as the package - which contains a large bunch of papers with strange writing - enters his life, everything is turned on upside down. People are getting killed all around him, he loses everything in life that means something to him, and wherever he goes the mysterious Men in Black always follows close behind. And when he starts translating the documents, a whole world opens up for him...

City of Pillars is a piece of fictions filled with Men in Black, spectacular action, esoteric thoughts, and paranoid conspiracy theories. Sinclair's travels take him around the world and lasts for several years, but it never becomes boring and it's most definitely one of those books you just don't want to stop reading once you get into it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By S.A. Molteni on August 26, 2014
Format: Paperback
City of Pillars by Dominic Peloso is a suspenseful and thrilling ride into the depths of paranoia and conspiracy theories.

The main character, Sinclair, has a good life and a perfect wife. That is until he drives to work one day over the Golden Gate Bridge. On that fateful day, a strange toll booth worker (dressed in black) tosses a package into Sinclair's car. Once he opens the package and starts trying to decipher the text within, his world is turned upside down.

City of Pillars does remind me a bit of the Davinci Code by Dan Brown, but I actually enjoyed reading Mr. Peloso's book more than Dan Brown's. The characters are well-developed and the plot is very believable - makes the reader really stop and think about what is actually happening in the world.

I would definitely recommend this book to those readers who love suspense, thrillers and of course - conspiracies.
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