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City at World's End (Crest Giant, s184) Mass Market Paperback – January 1, 1957


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Mass Market Paperback, January 1, 1957
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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Publisher: Crest Giant; First Edition edition (1957)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000EL857U
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (90 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,504,755 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

This read for sci fi fans is a must.
Amazon Customer
I really liked the main character and was really drawn in to the story.
Karen Nagy
Over the last 20 years or so, I've read this book a few times.
John Baarda Sr.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Mary Ellison on August 13, 2009
Format: Kindle Edition
A small town in the mid 1950s, population about 50,000, is suddenly displaced through time and finds itself on a dying planet that circles a dying star. Soon it becomes clear that they are still on Earth, but are millions of years in Earth's future. The problem: survival.

Although I found it a little predictable in places, this novel held my interest and is well written and well formated for the Kindle. The writing is in the 1950s style, so a few of the author's facts are a bit dated. Overall, however, the story line holds up well.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Michael D Ward on March 10, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
A solid science fiction effort. Certainly no classic, but generally well written and interesting. The story unfolds nicely as the residents of a small city try to find out why the world around them has changed so much (and why they are still alive!) after a nuclear bomb hits their town. City at World's End is 1950's science fiction and not for all taste. It will probably be enjoyed most by those who enjoy Ray Bradbury or the original Star Trek TV series.
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25 of 28 people found the following review helpful By "mythologue" on December 31, 2002
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This book's strong opening chapter confronts scientists with the unthinkable: a superatomic bomb has fallen on Middletown, a small American city hiding a secret antiatomic laboratory, servering it from its surroundings; the sun is now red and drawn out, the moon is unrecognizable, the temperature is low. Various hypotheses are considered to explain all of this, and the most unlikely might well be the one closest to the truth. After the initial event has occurred, transmission of knowledge proceeds in a myriad of interesting ways: between scientific and non-scientific Middletownians at first, but then between strangers from the future - some apparently human, some not - and scientific Middletownians (who take on the role of their non-scientific peers because of their relative ignorance). Even though they generally remain on the good side, the 20th century humans' role is decently complex and shows a nuanced way of approaching the space opera subgenre of science-fiction: they frequently reverse roles with `the other' and even become an historical curiosity under the eye of an historian from the future. This novel's structure is careful, every step being taken with a studied internal cohesion and sense of pace. Its position on science remains ultimately optimistic, but it does acknowledge some of the dangers it could cause and offers an original kind of civilization shock.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Phyl L. Good on April 16, 2007
Format: Paperback
I read this book in my early teens in the 60's, and then lost it, and have hunted for it ever since. At last, a friend found it and sent it to me, and last night, I read it again and held my breath to see if it was as good a story as my younger self thought it was.

To my surprise, it really was. It's obviously very dated, and there's some sexism in there that made me grit my teeth. (Especially the bit about the main [male] character's frustration with the inability of the female mind to grasp scientific concepts! Grrr.) And then there was the people's unquestioning faith in science to solve every problem, so that all the scientists had to do when people were panicking was assure them that the science was reliable, so therefore everything would turn out okay. That made me smile a little fondly, at the good ol' days.

But apart from some of those things, the story really does stand up well. It was an excellent examination of what might have happened to people whose entire town had been thrust far into the future of an almost-expired earth. The story poignantly conveyed the loneliness of the arid world, and the deep loss felt by the people, yet it also portrayed their resilience and the power of the human spirit to adapt and bring good out of something terrible.

It definitely resembled the first Star Trek series, in the way it had such faith in that resilience and human spirit. In much the same way as many Trek episodes, you got that scene where the undaunted human being stood alone in front of a galatic council, reminding the star-flung descendants of his world that they owed all their high principles and peaceful lifestyle to the struggles -- and yes, wars -- that the people of his time went through. Very rah-rah humanity.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By D. Blankenship HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on September 16, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I first read this one in the mid 70s. I enjoyed it then and after digging through my storage rooms (I never throw anything, in particular books away), I found it and read it again. Certainly different than the standars SiFi we get today. Anyone interested in tracing the evolution of SiFi would certainly be interested in this one. The book is well written, well crafted. While, as one reviewer put it, it will never be a classic, it certainly is worth a second look. Recommend it highly.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By J. Thomason on February 22, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I discovered this book thru John Byrne, a comic book artist who had created a few concept sketches for the characters. He said it was his favorite scifi book, and being the John Byrne fan I am, decided I would probably like it to. And I did--a lot!

This book begins in a small town during the mid 20th Century that is sent millennia into the future by the blast of a super atomic bomb that ripped the spacetime continuum. The book follows the journey of one scientist who helps the people discover where they are, when they are, and what to do about it. They discover a domed city long abandoned by humans who have fled to the stars. They meet aliens and learn how laws and government haven't evolved after countless years.

What I liked about the book was the journey you follow along with the main characters. You discover the future one piece at a time. You also see how people don't seem to ever evolve-they're just as conniving, scheming, and treacherous as ever. I also enjoy the characters and how you get to know them thru their reactions to what's going on.

This book was written half a century ago so some of the science isn't current, but that won't stop you from enjoying the book. It's a very good piece of speculative fiction.
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