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Civil Resistance and Power Politics: The Experience of Non-violent Action from Gandhi to the Present Paperback – November 15, 2011


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Civil Resistance and Power Politics: The Experience of Non-violent Action from Gandhi to the Present + Why Civil Resistance Works: The Strategic Logic of Nonviolent Conflict (Columbia Studies in Terrorism and Irregular Warfare)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 432 pages
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (November 15, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0199691452
  • ISBN-13: 978-0199691456
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 1 x 6.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.7 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #929,897 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review


"Highly informative compilation of different quests for political, economic, and social change over the past half-century. The great value of Civil Resistance and Power Politics is to provide relatively succinct accounts of these diverse events in such a way as to underline both their differences and their similarities."--New York Review of Books


"Roberts and Garton Ash succeed in their task magnificently. Seldom has a collective work displayed such coordinated research; seldom has the selection of authors been so successful...and seldom have the introductory and concluding essays in an edited work been so effective...indispensable book"--Survival


"This book is a timely reminder that realpolitik is by no means always the best way to consolidate power. And this may prompt a rethink as to the very nature of power itself."--International Affairs


"A book full of thought-provoking stories and arresting statistics...a valuable contribution to our understanding of a phenomenon that history has too often ignored--and a political tactic that looks set to become even more potent in the years ahead." --Sunday Business Post


About the Author


Sir Adam Roberts is President of the British Academy, Senior Research Fellow of Politics and International Relations at Oxford University, and Emeritus Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford University. His main academic interests are in the fields of international security, international organizations, and international law (including the laws of war). He has also worked extensively on the role of civil resistance against dictatorial regimes and foreign rule, and on the history of thought about international relations. Professor Robert's is the co-editor of The United Nations Security Council and War (OUP 2008), Documents on the Laws of War (OUP 2000), and Hugo Grotius and International Relations (OUP 1992).

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies at Oxford University, Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St Antony's College, Oxford University, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. He is the author of eight books of political writing or 'history of the present' which have charted the transformation of Europe over the last quarter-century. His essays appear regularly in the New York Review of Books and he writes a weekly column in the Guardian which is widely syndicated in Europe, Asia and the Americas. Throughout the nineteen eighties, he reported and analyzed the emancipation of Central Europe from communism in contributions to the New York Review of Books, the Independent, the Times, and the Spectator.

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By ewaffle on May 7, 2012
Format: Paperback
This book describes and critiques non-violent civil resistance movements from throughout the world including those that succeeded - such as the struggle for Indian independence and the U.S. civil rights movement - as well as those that did not such as in Northern Ireland from 1967 to 1972 or the Tiananmen Square demonstrations in the People's Republic of China. The authors of the essays identify some of the more typical non-violent tactics, strategies and concepts which I will overly simplify into three areas.

First there is non-violence as a deeply felt commitment, as good itself and something to strive for no matter what the outcome. Gandhi in British India and Martin Luther King in the United States are two of the most obvious examples. Both men understood that the power of the repressive state rests on the obedience of their citizens (or subjects) and that the active withdrawal of this consent will cause increasing instability in the regime. The "Saffron Revolution" led by Buddhist monks in Burma may be the purest example: Theravada Buddhism, followed by 90% of the Burmese population, permits only a non-violent approach to problem-solving. Monks are instructed that any word they speak and any action they take not only does no harm to others but also can bring about a positive change in reaction in even the most implacable enemies.

Secondly is non-violence as a tactic that had to be adopted due to a precarious military, economic or political situation. Lech Walesa in Poland understood that surrounded by Warsaw Pact troops and with the 1968 intervention into Czechoslovakia fresh in memories throughout eastern and central Europe that he and the strikers at the Lenin shipyard in Gdansk had to walk a very fine line to keep the tanks on the other side of the Polish border.
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By eugene hynes on September 3, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I paired this as a textbook with Gene Sharp's _ From Dictatorship to Democracy_ in a course on Social Dissent. The two work very well together, and contribute to insights and excellent discussions about ongoing conflicts.
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