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Civilization One: The World is Not as You Thought It Was Paperback – January 1, 1999


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Watkins (January 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1842931660
  • ISBN-13: 978-1842931660
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,116,784 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Christopher Knight invested seven years conducting research into the origins of Freemasonic rituals. His first book, The Hiram Key (1996), co-authored with Robert Lomas, became an instant bestseller and has since been translated into 37 languages selling over a million copies worldwide. Alan Butler, an engineer, but fascinated by history, also became an expert in astrology and astronomy. He has researched ancient cultures, pagan beliefs and comparative religion and has published four successful books the Knights Templar and the Grail legend.

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Customer Reviews

This book makes the assumption that knowledge is a very difficult thing to lose.
Mr. T. Malik
The book is very well written, very easy to read (not too technical and a good writing style).
Adam Sorenson
So basically this book is lecturing to the choir, but unfortunately it's a boring sermon.
Mark Gibbs

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

176 of 187 people found the following review helpful By Pieter Uys HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on July 18, 2005
Format: Hardcover
This fascinating book of alternative history examines the evidence of weights and measures and comes to the conclusion that there must have been an advanced culture in prehistory. The structures of the Stone Age were built by using a very precise unit of measurement, called the megalithic yard. The book explores the science behind prehistoric units, their mathematical origin and means of reproduction, and proves that these are linked to the dimensions of the solar system.

The reader must have a basic knowledge of arithmetic but overall the book is an easy read and very revealing. Amongst the topics discussed are writing, Egypt, Sumeria, the Minoan foot, solar and sidereal days, pendulums and the importance of the planet Venus. It turns out that the British Pound and Pint are both derived from ancient measurements. The units of the hour, minute and second were developed more than 4000 years ago, from the movements of the moon.

The text also encompasses subjects like the harmony of the spheres, Sumerian degrees and the calendar, and explains that the metric system is not a recent invention. There is a section on Thomas Jefferson and his achievements; this great man apparently realized that he was rediscovering parts of a very ancient system.

Amongst the most captivating sections is the chapter on music and light. There is a definite correspondence between the rotating mass of our planet and human music. Also, megalithic mathematics produces its own musical structure. The authors conclude that there must have been an advanced people who instructed the rest of the world in science and technology. They also refer to the Masonic concept of the Great Architect of the Universe.
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31 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Harvey L. Gaspar MD on September 18, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I have made the journey from the Hiram Key, through the Book of Hiram and now Civilization One. They are all interconnected but not in the way that I had thought them to be. If I had to choose only one to remember, it would be C.O. because it provides some solution as to how we begin our quest for true knowledge of who we are and the origin of our culture. It provides a unifying theory of our civil developement but does not yet reveal the origins of our culture. I am fully expecting more to come from the authors and suspect I will not be disappointed. The book is all 'stuff' and no 'fluff' and is presented in such a way that anyone with basic math skills can follow it adequately to understand the conclusions. It is an easy read but still left me with an urge for more info. Although the music is nice and interesting, I would have been satisfied just knowing about it, since hearing it does nothing to confirm or deny the other data presented. Congratulations to both authors, and I wish them courage to withstand the abuse that will no doubt come from the main body of scientific research. And Chris, I agree with your summation in Appendix 7.

Harvey L. Gaspar MD

hlgaspar@cox.net Tulsa Oklahoma, USA
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35 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Grondwell on December 6, 2004
Format: Hardcover
This book is a real world-changer. It is exciting to read and the facts are beyond dispute. I am on my third reading right now and I would recommend this book to everyone. Some of the reviews on this site must be from people who have not read the book - such as someone who rambles on about Knight and Butler having invented some connection between ancient peoples. This is not what the book is about at all! They stick to testable facts that I for one have checked out.

I'm still getting over the impact this book has had on me -read it and make up your own mind.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Barry Kane on September 21, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I'm only three-quarters through this book but it is fantastic - and its all good science. Despite what one very ill-informed reviewer said, Venus is the perfect solution for the Megalithic Yard reproduction because it is a disc! Watching trailing edge to trailing edge works beautifully as a timing mechanism.

These guys have just fitted the biggest jigsaw together and the picture it produces is simply breath-taking.
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51 of 62 people found the following review helpful By Red on February 14, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I love this book and many others that Christopher Knight has written. The ideas put forth by him add a few more pieces to the puzzle of ancient history and science. It's too bad that someone expecting the book to be about something else was compelled to rate it so badly. Not to mention someone else rating it so badly due to the fact that something else is written in the old testament. Don't just read this book hoping to find an argument; read it to gain another viewpoint and some knowledge.
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49 of 60 people found the following review helpful By Sylvain Tristan on December 3, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I've just read this book twice. There are no words that can convey the stupefaction, amazement and wonderment that this book caused in me. I'll try to, however, but the truth is far beyond. Fantastically brilliant! What Alan Butler and Christopher Knight have done is a powerful achievement. It is by far the best book I have ever read and I would be surprised if there ever is one that will surpass it. I am quite convinced there won't be any, because what they did is incredible enough.
The demonstration is brilliant and touches the sublime. Even better than Butler's own "The Bronze Age Computer Disc," published 5 years ago.
Easy to read, easy verifiable calculations, the origin of geometry imposes itself as an evidence which is doubly startling: first, everything is integrated within a system which, incredibly, is thousands of years old; second, the book unambiguously shows that the very laws of our part of the universe are very hard to explain without a "Great Architect" ... unless anyone has a better explanation?? The two authors just show the existence of some "Great Underlying Principle." Both of these facts are breathtaking.
For the numbers 366, 10 and 40 are just omnipresent in calendars, time, planet dimensions, units of length and weights!
The subtitle of the book is not exaggerated -- this book shows that the world is not as you thought it was, and it might change your life forever!

Sylvain Tristan, author of 'Les Lignes d'or' (Paris, Alphee 2005)
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