Customer Reviews


12 Reviews
5 star:
 (6)
4 star:
 (3)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating and accessible - a great resource
Michael Lodahl's fascinating work illuminates the Quran in a way that allows the Christian reader to grasp both the details and the spirit of Islam's most holy book. He is thorough, but does a very good job of keeping the reader's head above water. Lodahl does a great service to Muslim-Christian understanding by taking the Quran seriously rather than using it as a foil...
Published on March 23, 2010 by Agile Arts

versus
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Sharing Abraham
Michael Lodahl wrote Claiming Abraham: reading the bible and the quran side by side with the intention to provide a comparison between the textual scriptures and point out their similarities and explore the differences. Lodahl does a good job of addressing key similarities and minor or major differences between the religious texts. He chooses a topic and then incorporates...
Published 4 months ago by Sofyan Abbasi


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating and accessible - a great resource, March 23, 2010
By 
Agile Arts (Washington, DC) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Claiming Abraham: Reading the Bible and the Qur'an Side by Side (Paperback)
Michael Lodahl's fascinating work illuminates the Quran in a way that allows the Christian reader to grasp both the details and the spirit of Islam's most holy book. He is thorough, but does a very good job of keeping the reader's head above water. Lodahl does a great service to Muslim-Christian understanding by taking the Quran seriously rather than using it as a foil for theological argument.

Of note: His final chapter deals with End Times expectations in both the Quran and the Bible. This is especially illuminating - it may open the eyes of some Christians to what the Bible says on the topic as well as what is in the Quran. Lodahl isn't the first to set Muslim and Christian ideas about the End Times side-by-side. In the 1880's, hundreds of Mennonites fled to Central Asia in search of the place of Christ's Second Coming, and found themselves in the care of a Muslim king. Along the way they debated eschatology with hostile rulers, and studied Islamic scripture in the palace of Khiva's Khan. The best book on this episode in Muslim-Christian relations is Pilgrims on the Silk Road: A Muslim-Christian Encounter in Khiva. It would make a great companion to Lodahl's book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Orientation, December 27, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Claiming Abraham: Reading the Bible and the Qur'an Side by Side (Paperback)
Great primer for those interested in learning more about Islam and how Muslims view the Qur'an and Christianity. Essential read prior to reading the Qur'an.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lodahl gets it right, September 22, 2010
By 
Lodahl's book offers two important insights--first, the great similiarity between the Quranic and Biblical traditions when viewed on the surface and, second, the vast differences between the traditions when carefully considered. Lodahl writes as a Christian theologian, though as a theologian of exceptional wit and sensitivity. What results is both a clear depiction of the interaction between the traditions under consideration and an equally clear depiction of the important differences between an Islamic theology of Quranic revelation (as the written words of the Quran) and a Christian theology of incarnational revelation (as the Living Word of Christ). A truly great read!
Thomas E. Phillips
Prof. of New Testament & Early Christianity
Point Loma Nazarene University
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It all starts with hermeneutics, April 7, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Claiming Abraham: Reading the Bible and the Qur'an Side by Side (Paperback)
Dr. Lodahl's book does a great job "peeling the layers of the onion" of the Qu'ran. Why did Muhammad introduce subtleties and nuances not found in the Biblical text? Lodahl brilliantly surveyed Rabbinical commentary from the first few centuries AD and even some of the gnostic gospels. Their influence on the Qu'ran cannot be understated.

What is even more awesome, however, is that Lodahl is respectful through the entire book. he is always gentle when dealing with disagreements, and he always tried to preach peace (even though our doctrines really are irreconcilable).

I highly recommend the book for anyone with an open mind who is interested in understanding more of the Qu'ran's theological foundation.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Unity at some time., December 11, 2013
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Claiming Abraham: Reading the Bible and the Qur'an Side by Side (Paperback)
The author writes in a very deft way that draws parallels and comparisons between the two cultures. It is enlightening and very informative, giving depth and understanding for the readers.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Eye-Opener To Our Similarities and Origins, September 14, 2010
By 
MasterAP (Maryland, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Claiming Abraham: Reading the Bible and the Qur'an Side by Side (Paperback)
Michael Lodahl has written the perfect book to introduce ideas in comparing the writings of Islam, Christianity and Judaism.

Claiming Abraham is scholarly yet written in a way everyone can understand. You will be surprised at the similarities between the three religions that have been stereotyped as arch rivals.

With 12 chapters, Lodahl dives into the differences with regards to:

Abraham
Israel and Christianity
The God of Creation
The actual Word of God
Adam and what it means to be human
Cain and Abe
The truth behind the Noah story
What happened at Sinai
Mary the mother of Jesus
Who Jesus really was
The idea behind Allah or Adonai
and the end of the world.

I found it fascinating to read that it's possible Mohammad gained some of his beliefs from the Jewish commentators of his time. It's also fun to read how a few Christian stories have some of their points originating from the Qur-an and Islamic thought rather than the Bible.

Claiming Abraham is a terrific book for anyone interested in learning more about Islam, Christianity and how other religions view similar stories.

A great read.

This book was provided for review by Brazos Press.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Sharing Abraham, November 21, 2013
This review is from: Claiming Abraham: Reading the Bible and the Qur'an Side by Side (Paperback)
Michael Lodahl wrote Claiming Abraham: reading the bible and the quran side by side with the intention to provide a comparison between the textual scriptures and point out their similarities and explore the differences. Lodahl does a good job of addressing key similarities and minor or major differences between the religious texts. He chooses a topic and then incorporates all quranic and biblical references that are related to the topic and presents them side-by-side. This was a good way of learning key similarities and differences between the texts, and perhaps even a good way to comprehend why these similarities and differences came about. Lodahl provides detailed historical context to each subject. He made it easy to understand the background information relevant to each subject, which made a good transition in understanding every aspect of the material being presented.
While most of the book is satisfactory when it comes to reading and learning about the same ideas in the quran and the bible, the only part that made me a little uneasy is the fact that lodahl was comparing ideas between relatively liberal Christian views to a more conservative Islamic view. This affects the text in many situations as it does not fully apprehend the full teachings of islam and its many different perspectives. In certain situations, even liberal and conservative Christian views would not be similar. Therefore, you must constantly be looking out for the fact that lodahl is comparing two opposite ends of two different religions. These differences that he states in many chapters might not be there if the author took into consideration a more incorporated view of both Christianity and islam. All in all, the book provided a lot of information that helps in studying both the bible and the quran simultaneously. One thing that really helped was the little boxes that lodahl provides with both biblical and quranic verses that are relevant to the topic. These little verses helped in understanding the bigger picture that lodahl was trying to portray.
This book is very comprehensive in learning the quran and bible and its concepts and ideas side by side. While it may not be my favorite book, I would recommend this book as an introductory read to anyone willing to learn more about the bible and the quran.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


13 of 20 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars An interesting first step in exploring the Qur'an from a Christian perspective, but a shallow one., December 6, 2010
This review is from: Claiming Abraham: Reading the Bible and the Qur'an Side by Side (Paperback)
Michael Lodahl's work in Claiming Abraham is a very basic introduction to comparative textual analysis between Qur'anic and Biblical texts. That being said, Mr. Lodahl seems to lack a sensitivity for, and appreciation of, the Islamic interpretative tradition regarding origins and use of the text of the Qur'an. This is especially evident in his total lack of analysis of major Tafsir works, including the essential Al-Kashshaaf 'an Haqa'iq at-Tanzil, instead trusting his own analysis of the Qur'an in translation as a firm basis for theological work. This is problematic at best as Lohahl's lack of Arabic hinders his ability to see for himself what the Qur'an says about a subject, instead seeing what a translator says about it.

This is a huge problem with Qur'anic study in English. The Qur'an exists only in Arabic, and once the document has been translated, it ceases to be the Qur'an according to Islamic theology and the principle of i'jaz al-Qur'an (inimitability of the Qur'an). The language of the Qur'an, Arabic, as a Semitic language is highly dependent on context of words for determining their meaning as spelling alone is not enough, meaning the translator must make far more significant, and more frequent, judgments about meaning than a translator of a Latin text might have to. Thus an orthodox Muslim would say that, at best, Lodahl is working with an echo of the Qur'an proper. How useful is this to a Christian seeking to learn about the Qur'an, or a Muslim?

Ignoring the fact that the Qur'an and the Bible are very different in form, and that the narratives that Lodahl focuses his book on are a very small section of the Qur'an we are still left with an inadequate source for comparative textual criticism of any real depth. While I would recommend Lodahl's book to Christians just getting their feet wet with comparative religious studies I would much rather recommend Andrew Rippin's Muslims: their religious beliefs and practices as a superior source of introductory material about the Qur'an and Islam in general. As for a superior source of comparative textual analysis I have to recommend Bible and Quran: Essays in Scriptural Intertextuality edited by John C. Reeves as a seminal work in the area that came in very useful during the course of my own studies.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Student Review, November 16, 2013
This review is from: Claiming Abraham: Reading the Bible and the Qur'an Side by Side (Paperback)
I'll preface this post by saying that I am by no means an expert on religion, simply a university student who took a religion class which compared Islam, Judaism and Christianity, specifically through the Bible and Qur'an.

I found that Lodahl does a great job of addressing many key elements of Christianity, Judiasm, and Islam, as seen through the lens of the sacred texts. The main strength seems to be the wonderful historical context offered. I was able to grasp to a degree where these texts originated, and that was invaluable in my interpretation.

I would say that the main shortcoming here is the fact that Lodhal seems to be comparing a relatively liberal view of Christianity, to a more traditional Islamic interpretation. I wouldn't say it detracts much from the overall educational value of the text, but would recommend keeping an eye out for it. There are many instances where there appears to be a stark difference in perspective, but that wouldn't necessarily be the case if a more fully fledged perspective of Islam in the current world context were considered.

Writing and delivery style were exceptionally clear and easy to follow. I particularly appreciated the tables which had side by side quotes from the texts. Even though a side by side of very different texts seems problematic, I found that it did have some use when incorporated into the text at large.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating, April 5, 2010
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Claiming Abraham: Reading the Bible and the Qur'an Side by Side (Paperback)
Every time I've read through the Qur'an, some of the stories seemed just bizarre and nonsensical. Lodahl's book gives me some understanding of why the Quranic stories are so different from their Biblical counterparts: in many cases, Mohammad was not basing his stories on the Biblical accounts at all, but rather on later Jewish & Christian interpretive developments which came about either because these interpreters didn't feel comfortable with the anthropomorphic God presented in Scripture, or because they couldn't resist elaborating and embellishing the Biblical accounts with details that, for whatever reason, the original writers didn't include. But this book isn't just about the Qur'an; by looking carefully at how the Jewish & Christian were interpreting Scripture prior to and during the time of Mohammad, Lodahl raises some excellent questions for Bible readers today. Many modern-day Christians unknowingly hold views of God that seem more like the Qur'anic portrait than the biblical portrait. Reading this book can help you regain a more authentically biblical view of God.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First
ARRAY(0xa22c89f0)

This product

Claiming Abraham: Reading the Bible and the Qur'an Side by Side
Claiming Abraham: Reading the Bible and the Qur'an Side by Side by Michael E. Lodahl (Paperback - April 1, 2010)
$23.00 $20.70
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.