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Classic Catholic Converts Paperback – February 28, 2001


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 220 pages
  • Publisher: Ignatius Press (February 28, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0898707870
  • ISBN-13: 978-0898707878
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.3 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,754,636 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Rich Leonardi on April 16, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Fr. Connor has written terrific, essay-length profiles of about a dozen converts and a handful of conversion movements, e.g., the Oxford Movement, the converts of Fulton Sheen. Since the intended audience is 'Anglo-American,' most of the subjects of his sketches are from the United States and England. Included are popular and less-well-known figures like John Henry Newman, Ronald Knox, Dorothy Day, Jacques Maritain, and G.K. Chesterton. At a time of both confusion and opportunity within Catholicism, the men and women described in these pages show what it is about the Church that has inspired so many to make tremendous sacrifices to join her.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Gord Wilson VINE VOICE on November 6, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Father Charles Connor is my favorite television personality to watch. He's an avid reader, well-informed, and a fount of knowledge. But more than that, he's so excited that he gets ahead of himself. So I wondered what his writing style would be like in this book. This book dates from 2001, and on the back it says he had a show on EWTN called "Historic Catholic Converts". I've not seen that show (or maybe it's a series), but I wonder if this book is made from transcripts of the shows. One reason is the order of the chapters, which I'll go into later. Also, I actually would rate this book 4.5 stars were that available, simply because some of the writing is not too clear-- I'd say Father Connor gets ahead of himself, as in the parts on Newman, which covers two chapters, and because sometimes it seems like a show transcript. However, this is one book that would be delightful to read on a Kindle, and I did read the first chapter that way. There is at least one minor error, a misprint of the title of Chesterton's novel, "The Ball and the Cross". Those tiny cavils are more than made up for by Father Connor's excitement, evident on every page. If you think history is dry as dust, you haven't read (or heard, or watched) Father Charles Connor.

One great thing about this book, as opposed to a TV show, is the bibliography and footnotes, which beckon to avid readers thirsting to explore further. More on the Newman part. These two chapters cover, first, the Oxford Movement, also known as the Tractarian Movement, of which Newman was a part, and then Newman himself. One reason these chapters are not quite clear is that the author doesn't tell the story smoothly, start to finish, as he tends to with the other converts.
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Format: Paperback
Fr. Charles Connor, a Church historian, is the host of several 13-part series on EWTN, and is the author of books such as Meditations On The Catholic Priesthood, John Cardinal O'Connor and the Culture of Life, The Saint for the Third Millennium: St Therese of Lisieux, The Spiritual Legacy of Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen, etc.

In this 2001 book he covers persons such as Edith Seton; John Henry Newman; Edith Stein; G.K. Chesterton; Jacques Maritain; Karl Stern; Dorothy Day; Malcolm Muggeridge, and many more,

He notes that as a young Anglican, John Henry Newman "had a deep conversion experience. He took a private vow of celibacy, began taking frequent communion in the Anglican Church, prayed regularly, and meditated often on Scripture. This formed the pattern for a very holy life, so holy, in fact, that most people would be quite surprised to discover his lifelong inner struggles with such things as pride, self-esteem, and the continuous control of his temper." (Pg. 36) He adds, “Newman’s conversion was very much an intellectual one. He came to the Church by a thought process.” (Pg. 41)

He points out that Transcendentalist Orestes Brownson wrote a story that he "hoped would bring others to the Church, but at the same time he let it be known the methods the Church was using to attract converts were, in his view, insufficient.
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