Classic Sinatra - His Great Performances 1953-1960

March 28, 2000 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
2:10
2
2:54
3
1:58
4
2:31
5
2:51
6
2:56
7
3:01
8
3:43
9
2:56
10
2:36
11
2:49
12
4:00
13
2:53
14
3:16
15
2:53
16
3:18
17
3:13
18
4:26
19
2:31
20
2:44

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: March 2, 2000
  • Release Date: March 2, 2000
  • Label: Capitol Records
  • Copyright: (C) 2000 Capitol Records, Inc.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 59:39
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000TEPK0M
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (166 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,550 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Every Sinatra song is a Classic Sinatra.
Eric Kent
This 2000 collection is one of the albums in the running for the title of the best one-disc compilation covering Sinatra's Capitol period (1953-1960).
Lawrance M. Bernabo
Excellent selection of Sinatra’s offerings; great songs, lyrics, orchestra, arraignments and that voice; very nostalgic.
Jaime J. Cagigas

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

110 of 115 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance M. Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on February 13, 2004
Format: Audio CD
First, kudos to Bob Norberg for his great job of remastering the twenty songs collected on "Classic Sinatra." I rarely notice the quality of recordings when I listen to them, so if I actually sit up and pay attention to the crisp clarity of these classic recordings then you know they have to be pretty good. This 2000 collection is one of the albums in the running for the title of the best one-disc compilation covering Sinatra's Capitol period (1953-1960). With the music arranged and conducted by Nelson Riddle, these are songs that reflect the period when Sinatra cemented his reputation as one of the greatest singers of the 20th century (I have no problem with handing him the top spot, but enjoy friendly debate).
Most of these songs represent Sinatra with singing songs including Cole Porter's "I Get a Kick Out of You," "You Make Me Feel So Young," Rodgers & Hart's "The Lady is a Tramp," and "Come Fly With Me." But as great as Sinatra is at swing, his mastery is best displayed in his saloon songs. "My Funny Valentine" is recorded at a perfect tempo that takes full advantage of Sinata's unparalleled phrasing and makes this the definitive recording of the Rodgers & Hart tune. Equally great is his superb "In the Wee Small Hours," the title track from his first LP where he captured the sense of heartbreak and loneliness that we have all assumed came out of his breakup with Ava Gardner. Again, Riddle comes up with the perfect arrangement to set the stage for the devastating vocals. Add "One for My Baby (And One More for the Road)" and you have the three crown jewels of Sinatra as the ultimate saloon singer.
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82 of 85 people found the following review helpful By Ben Alba on April 30, 2000
Format: Audio CD
I came of age musically in the 1970s, which is when I first became acquainted with Frank Sinatra. By this time, his voice had long been in decline, and he was experimenting with questionable contemporary material like "It's Not Easy Being Green" and that hideous disco version of "Night and Day." I did like him then, but he sounded tired bellowing his way through latter-day concert versions of his 1950s-era hits. Yes, he sang as if he had lived his songs, but I still wondered why his longtime fans consistently used superlatives to describe him.
Acquiring this CD and listening to The Voice upclose and personal finally awakened me to the genius that everybody has been applauding for generations. The Capitol-era Sinatra possessed a rare combination of subtlety, control, spontaneity, and swagger that are evident on these classic '50s sides. I can feel the lilt in his step on "I've Got the World on a String" and the fragility and heartbreak in "One for My Baby." His phrasing of "Come Dance with Me" and "I Get a Kick Out of You" ("It would bore me terriFFFFFFFF - ic'ly too") is delightfully playful and inspired. It is now obvious to me why so many regard Sinatra as the quintessential American pop singer.
If you're new to Sinatra and overwhelmed by the avalanche of CDs to choose from, you'll have no regrets buying this one first.
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65 of 68 people found the following review helpful By Jon Warshawsky on April 25, 2000
Format: Audio CD
There is probably no way that anyone can take 20 songs from Sinatra's Capitol years and NOT come up with a five-star album. That said, this is one of the better Best of packages, and I would recommend it to anyone who has not already bought the Best of the Capitol Years or, better still, the original concept albums. Songs like It Happened in Monterey and Put Your Dreams Away are more imaginative and deserving selections than those on the numerous other Capitol Sinatra compilations. This set also earns high marks for original recordings, avoiding the awful studio-engineered duet trap that marred the otherwise okay Sinatra 80th 2-CD set.
If this is your only Sinatra purchase, you are missing the enjoyment of the concept albums, which were assembled carefully to create a mood and an experience -- swinging, melancholy, etc. Ironically (or maybe not!), the best songs on the concept albums were not always the opening tracks (Come Fly with Me, Come Dance with Me,...), and by limiting yourself to this set you may be missing some great tunes.
There are several less available concept albums, such as Close to You (mentioned by another reviewer below)and No One Cares, but these are not represented here -- which would have made this set much more attractive to Sinatraphiles who already own everything on Classic Sinatra. Capitol would have served us better by finding something new in the Sinatra archives (such as the great 1957 Seattle concert released last year!) rather than resequencing admittedly great songs that were already readily available. In the meantime, I would strongly recommend to serious fans to find used copies of the more obscure Capitol albums: they do exist on CD, and if you are patient you can find them reasonably priced on eBay or other auction sites. Or you can buy the big Capitol set for a few hundred dollars...
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58 of 62 people found the following review helpful By Charles F. Held Jr. on November 9, 2009
Format: Audio CD
First off, everyone should own the music contained on this disc. 1950's Sinatra represents truly the best of the best of American music - fantastic songwriters, arrangers, players and recording engineers, all providing the perfect complements our greatest interpreter of swing, show, and saloon tunes. Unfortunately, since about 1960, very few of Sinatra's peak performances have been commercially available in optimal sound quality in any format. At that time, Capitol reprocessed the original tapes, creating new "masters" with added echo, silly equalization, fake stereo, and other sonic abominations.

When Frank's Capitol output first got released on CD around 1987, mastering engineer Larry Walsh did a passable job considering the available technology and the the combination of "wrong" tapes he was often working with and "wrong" instructions he was given regarding when and how to add reverb to tapes that in their original, classic LP releases were "dry". A pair of compilations (the single-disc "Capitol Collectors Series" and 3CD "The Capitol Years", both also mastered by Walsh) improved things by going back to the genuine 1950's masters and NOT adding reverb.

Then in the mid-to-late-90's, Capitol handed its Sinatra CD projects over to Bob Norberg, who among Sinatraphiles is about as popular as Voldemort. Norberg readily admits that he is more interested in putting his own personal "stamp" on a project rather than presenting the listener with the most accurate representation of the original recording.
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