Industrial-Sized Deals Shop all Back to School Shop Women's Handbags Learn more nav_sap_SWP_6M_fly_beacon Andra Day $5 Off Fire TV Stick Off to College Essentials Shop Popular Services gotS5 gotS5 gotS5  Amazon Echo Starting at $99 Kindle Voyage Metal Gear Solid 5 Shop Back to School with Amazon Back to School with Amazon Outdoor Recreation Learn more
Buy Used
$1.53
+ $3.99 shipping
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This item is used and in good condition. It may have minor highlghting and wear.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Classic Toys of the National Toy Hall of Fame: Celebrating the Greatest Toys of All Time! Hardcover – September 22, 2009

19 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$15.99 $1.53

Best Books of the Year So Far
Best Books of the Year So Far
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2015's Best Books of the Year So Far in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Editorial Reviews

Review

Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, October 21, 2009
"Curator Scott Eberle writes lively histories of the toys, photographed in whimsical poses."

Dallas Morning News, December 7, 2009
"Kids will love thumbing through this one, but they'll no doubt have to pry it out of the hands of their rapt parents first. The book is sure to evoke lots of boomer-generation childhood memories, and might even coax a 21st-century tot into wanting something as archaic as, say, a Raggedy Ann doll or a Hula Hoop.

The text displays a nice sense of humor and irony. For instance: 'The bubble-cut Barbie that appeared in 1961 softened the doll's look by replacing the tight Teutonic ponytail. When Barbie parted her hair on the side, she seemed more casual and less severe, more Fresno and less Frankfurt.'"

Ann Strainchamps, Wisconsin Public Radio, December 4, 2009
“One of the best coffee table books of the year.”

Babble.com
“Get it for you, then share the stories with the kids.”

The Journal-Register, December 10, 2009
“Nostalgia, history, sociology — this book covers all of the imaginable bases that are involved with play. Eberle’s work makes for a truly tremendous toy story.”

The Washington Post, December 24, 2009
"…wonderful…There's no doubt that "Classic Toys" will entice even the most hard-nosed Scrooge or hardhearted Grinch to waste a lot of valuable, billable time simply smiling over pictures of Radio Flyer wagons, wooden rocking horses and fancy Duncan yo-yos. Those of a more sentimental nature may simply find themselves aching with nostalgia. But the pictures are only half the story here. Don't neglect Scott G. Eberle's fact-filled essays…Because of Eberle's sharply written text, "Classic Toys" isn't just a sentimental journey into childhood: It's also a work of incisive cultural commentary and a pleasure to read."

The Commercial Dispatch, February 5, 2010
“…a big, colorful book that is bound to bring you a happy sense of nostalgia….this book is so delightful…This is a book about a subject that all of us love, and it is colorful, informative, and (pardon) playful.”

About the Author

Scott G. Eberle is Vice President for Interpretation at Strong National Museum of Play. He has developed numerous exhibitions on toys and play, and has written extensively on these topics. He holds a doctorate in Cultural History from the University at Buffalo, and is also the author of several works on American cultural history. He lives in Rochester, NY.

The Strong National Museum of Play in Rochester, NY, is one of the nation’s largest history museums, an affiliate of The Smithsonian, holder of the most comprehensive toy collection in the U.S., and home of the National Toy Hall of Fame, whose annual November induction ceremony is seen by 50 million people via widespread national and local television media coverage. Visit them on the web: www.strongmuseum.org

See all Editorial Reviews
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Running Press; First Edition edition (September 22, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0762435658
  • ISBN-13: 978-0762435654
  • Product Dimensions: 12 x 9.1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,007,309 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

5 star
89%
4 star
11%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 19 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By John Odonnell on December 23, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Previous reviews have aptly and admiringly captured the features of this glorious book that will delight and inform readers of every generation (and viewers, for the illustrations and photography are beautifully selected and rendered). The book's topic, expressed in its subtitle, is "A celebration of the greatest toys of all time." It is hard to conceive of a book better designed to make such a celebration satisfying. I read a book more often than I run my dishwasher, and this one was one of the best I've read in years.

One reason for its success is that the subtitle's implicit claim--that the book has indeed identified which toys are "the greatest"--is reasonably assured. It's published by the Strong Museum of Play, one of the nation's biggest history museums and the premier repository of toys. Under its auspices empaneled experts regularly refine criteria and referee objects for inclusion to Strong's National Toy Hall of Fame. At first glance the overjoyed reader might consider ranking superfluous and methods of selection academic, but ultimately they help insure that the toys treated in "Classic Toys" are the ones most readers will most fondly recall.

The key and related reason for the book's achievement is the author's ability to enhance our recollections by bringing to his treatments of each toy his remarkable understanding of the social, economic, cultural and material contexts within which these toys where invented, evolved, and played with.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By J. Clayton on December 22, 2009
Format: Hardcover
The next best thing to being a kid again might be recapturing the memories of childhood play through this artfully written and beautifully photographed book. Like the toys it features, there is no right way to enjoy it. Toy narratives are organized by year of induction into the National Toy Hall of Fame but I took my own route, reaching as far back as my memory goes to the rocking horse. As a kid my only goal was to see if I could ride it fast enough to tip it over. In Classic Toys of the National Toy Hall of Fame, author Scott Eberle fills me in on the details kids don't need to know. Weaving cultural history with humor, he sets each toy in the context of the time it was developed and traces its story through the years. I learn that my rocking horse is on the same family tree as wooden horses played with by children three-thousand years ago, that it helped me develop balance, and soothed my developmental need for motion. As Eberle points out, whether it's the rocking horse, the skate board, or Tinker Toys, developmental benefits like these are the dividend rather than the object of children's play.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Richard A. Gottlieb on December 22, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I am in the toy business and a National Toy Hall of Fame voter so I was particulalry interested in the book, "Classic Toys of the National Toy Hall of Fame." I am, as many of us are, familiar with all of these toys. They are classics.

What delighted me was Scott's writing which is at times poetry. Here is his prose in describing Crayola Crayons: "The blue sky; the yellow sun (with stylized rays radiating); the green grass; the brown horse peeking from its rred barn; all these filled in crayon drawings by countless millions."

Now let's put it in a poetic format:

The blue sky
The yellow sun (with stylized rays radiating)
The green grass
The brown horse peeking from its red barn
All these filled in crayon drawings by countless millions

The pictures are fantastic but with writing like this they are sometimees besides the point.

Wonderful, wonderful job.

Richard Gottlieb
USA Toy Experts
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By writeon on December 21, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Remember the "Seinfeld" episode where Jerry feeds his girlfriend turkey and wine every evening so she'll conk out and he can play with her collection of vintage toys? This book gives the rest of us the same chance to rediscover the coolest toys of all time. Baby Boomers in particular will get a rush of joyful nostalgia with every turn of the page in this handsome volume.

Author Scott Eberle showcases dozens of toys that have stood the test of playtime -- all inductees into the National Toy Hall of Fame, housed at the Strong National Museum of Play in Rochester, New York (which is, BTW, one of the most fun places my family and I have ever visited). Eberle's writing mixes history and humor as he traces the evolution of the featured toys alongside photos of older and newer models -- a 1965 box of LEGO bricks next to a robot created from the LEGO 2006 Mindstorm construction set, for example. The photos are a treat, from an 1860 portrait of a little girl with a tiny wooden rocking horse by her side, to the 1960s illustrated box containing the Easy-Pop Corn Popper attachment, WHICH FOR SOME REASON MY PARENTS NEVER BOUGHT FOR MY EASY-BAKE OVEN.

With an emphasis on creativity, fun, and the endless possibilities of play, the book features not just manufactured toys but also the everyday raw materials that generations of kids have transformed into Something Else: empty cardboard boxes and sticks (the latter featured in the delightful chapter "Poking Around"). There are generic toys -- dolls, marbles, jigsaw puzzles, alphabet blocks and checkers -- as well as specific brands, such as Lionel Trains and Crayola Crayons.

But this is not a one-dimensional picture book. Eberle's text is both amusing and insightful.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews