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Classic 80s Home Video Games Identification & Value Guide: Featuring Atari 2600, Atari 5200 Atari 7800, Coleco Vision, Odyssey, Intellivision, Victrex Paperback – Illustrated, March 18, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Collector Books; 1st edition (March 18, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1574325736
  • ISBN-13: 978-1574325737
  • Product Dimensions: 10.9 x 8.5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,299,175 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Among the hottest collectibles appealing to the people who were kids in the early 1980s are the early video games. Parents of those kids will also remember the begging for, first, and Atari, and then more and bore games to play on it. The Atari was introduced in 1980, In 1984 the video game market crashed, and no one in the market fell harder than Atari. In fact the market began to fall right after the Christmas season of 1982.

About the Author

Jason Brassard got his first Atari games Christmas 1981, and later in his twenties he became interested in Atari video games again. His first purchases in restarting his collection were the same games he got for Christmas years earlier, this time taking extreme care in preserving the boxes. Soon the collection outgrew his home, and it did not stop with Atari. He soon knew his destiny would be to open his own video game store. In 2001, Trade-N-Games was born and has been his profession ever since

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Customer Reviews

This is solely a selling guide.
Kris Butler
The layouts have all items arranged on the page in alphabetical order as well, unless the material on the page prevented this arrangement.
RW
A nice amount of information/content as well.
Pitfall Harry

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By RW on September 3, 2008
Format: Paperback
There has been some confusion about this book, caused by what I can only hope are unintentional misstatements concerning the book's content, so I'm here to clear up as much as I can.

There are 7 systems featured in this book: Atari 2600 VCS, Atari 5200 SuperSystem, Atari 7800 ProSystem, Coleco Vision, Intellivision, Odyssey2 and Vectrex.

The book does provide a comprehensive overview and visual guide to all the games listed. As boxes, manuals and cartridges usually all feature the same artwork during this period, we made sure we showed at least one of the three for every title, so you could see what you should be looking for (usually the box and/or cartridge).

This first version of this book focuses only on U.S. production releases. As we did not have an unlimited page count, we chose to focus only on the material most American consumers would have come in contact with at the typical U.S. retail store in the 1980s.

There are 1059 boxes shown, 934 cartridges, 154 overlays, 163 photos of merchandise (some photos show more than one item), and another 154 assorted photos, such as: magazines, Activision patches, catalogs and other supplemental material. That's 2435 painstakingly selected photos for those keeping track (I could be off by a handful, I kept losing my place!)

The introduction does contain an offer to purchase collections in the section that lists our contact information. However, the book is not littered with solicitations as has been suggested. There are several rare items where we note "If you have this item, please contact us." This notation is for research purposes. Because there is so little sales history for some items, we need more information on them. How did you acquire the item? Is it from your childhood collection?
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By D. Brodale on May 9, 2008
Format: Paperback
The one thing in this book's favor is its price, which renders criticism of it somewhat moot. At a glance, the guide offers relatively comprehensive coverage, but as one digs into the content offered, the beauty of the photo spreads is mostly skin deep. Although nearly all game titles presented within are documented with photographs, far too many items are only partially illustrated (e.g. only a cartridge, but not the accompanying manual or original packaging). Given that the authors could have reached out to the collecting community to obtain photos of the missing items, each absence adds up to an inexcusable shortcoming for a field guide. More troubling are entire product ranges that go unmentioned (e.g. the double-ended cartridges Xonox produced for the ColecoVision) and the rather slipshod presentation of non-game materials for each system, such as peripherals and third-party accessories. The latter are listed in bulk at the end of each section, often without photos, and in alphabetical order rather than categorized by item type. Much to-do is made of variants in packaging cataloged within its pages, but here, too, the information is scattered and incomplete, despite appearances that comprehensive research has been done. General layout of each section can at times be equally haphazard, but for the most part works.

Perhaps the greatest weakness of this work is the effort made to assign valuations to items for collectors. In some cases, the information is accurate. However, by and large, the dollar values appear to be assigned with no attention paid to real-world transactions, instead being plucked from the imaginations of the authors or thinly-veiled formulae (e.g.
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Format: Paperback
I purchased this book because I am a huge collector. I love the in depth info and bright color pictures. Great info on all systems and games leading up to the 1984 crash. In fact that is the only thing I find wrong with this book...it is titled "video games of the 80's" but it stops before NES/SEGA and the climb of 1985...If you are looking for info/$$$ on the 70's-early 80's products, this price guide is for you.
It even breaks down price info for the different versions of carts and how much a cart, or booklet, or boxed complete...also the pictures help out a lot when you are looking at different versions of the same game....
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By Mr. Rex on March 9, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Book features pictures of common and hard to find collectible items from Atari, Intellivison, Coleco, Imagc, and many (if not all) of the gaming companies from that time period when home gaming consoles were in their early days. I Love this book!
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By Pitfall Harry on February 10, 2014
Format: Paperback
well organized, great photos and awesome collection. seeing them helps to make it feel like you own the original cartridge, box, and instruction manual - all of them bound up into one colorful book. A nice amount of information/content as well. Highly recommended by Pitfall Harry, aka Alan Hewston of the Retrogaming Times Montly
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a great visual reference for classic home videogames. Sure, the prices are outdated, but I still love the book as a visual reference. I don't collect games, but I love trying new games on emulators, and this guide has inspired me to try many games that I would have ignored based on title alone. I have had it a few months and still flip through it on at least a weekly basis. The quality of images and print is professional, and it is definitely a "keeper" for my bookshelf ... but just hasn't made it yet to the bookshelf since I keep referring to it. In summary, if you enjoy retro games and aren't buying the book for the game values, then I highly recommend you pick up a copy!
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