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Classical Liberalism and the Austrian School Paperback – February 14, 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 372 pages
  • Publisher: Ludwig von Mises Institute; 1st edition (February 14, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1610160037
  • ISBN-13: 978-1610160032
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 5.9 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,986,336 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Ralph Raico, Professor Emeritus in European history at Buffalo State College is a senior fellow of the Mises Institute. He is a specialist on the history of liberty, the liberal tradition in Europe, and the relationship between war and the rise of the state. He is the author of The Place of Religion in the Liberal Philosophy of Constant, Tocqueville, and Lord Acton.

Customer Reviews

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Copernicus on November 14, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
In the time that I have to write a review, I just don't feel that I can do this work justice. It's an exhaustive and intellectually pleasing view into the history of Classical Liberalism. If you are interested in the Libertarian philosophy, this is a great starting point.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Antitruster on May 13, 2013
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Clear cut, comprehensive, it is not an introductory work, it presupposes some basic understanding. Very good bibliography for further reading.
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If you are looking for an exposition of the ideas behind Classical Liberalism, look elsewhere. Instead this book is a tedious slog through who said what when and who gets credit for what. It was impossible to find the ideas buried in the dross.
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0 of 3 people found the following review helpful By David Roemer on April 30, 2014
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I know two economists the author quotes in his book: Israel Kirzner and Murray Rothbard. In the late 1960s, I audited Kirzner's course while I was a graduate student in physics at New York University. In the summer of 1979, I took a course at Pace University on macroeconomics given by a professor whose thesis advisor was Kirzner. At some point, I expressed my view that macroeconomics was unintelligible. The professor replied that all economists considered macroeconomics intelligible. I said, "Israel Kirzner does not." The professor replied, "Not true. Professor Kirzner just does not do macroeconomics. He only does microeconomics." Some years later I told the story to Rothbard who said he was not surprised the Pace teacher thought such a thing.

How can there be such a disagreement between economists about economics? Are there such disagreements between biologists about biology and physicists about physics? A related question is what caused the following historical flip-flop:

"There us no doubt that after around 1900 the Liberal Party in Britain veered increasingly in a statist direction. In the United States a similar transformation took place within the Democratic Party--once 'the party of Jefferson and Jackson'--at a somewhat later date." (location 1836)

I don't agree at all with the author's explanation for the change:

"But such shifts, evident also in Continental parties that kept the liberal name, are easily explained by the dynamics of democratic electoral politics." (location 1838)

My theory is that liberalism is a neurotic response to religion. Religion causes conflict between people, conflict produces anxiety, and inhibition is a defense mechanism for anxiety.
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