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Classical and Nonclassical Logics: An Introduction to the Mathematics of Propositions Hardcover – August 28, 2005

ISBN-13: 978-0691122793 ISBN-10: 0691122792

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 520 pages
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press (August 28, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0691122792
  • ISBN-13: 978-0691122793
  • Product Dimensions: 1.6 x 6 x 9.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,133,371 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

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"We warmly welcome this book as an example of how the mathematical way of thinking can be made available and pleasant to a large group of students."--Solomon Marcus, Zentralblatt MATH

From the Inside Flap

"Offering a rich combination and breadth of material, this book is practically an encyclopedia of schools of logic; it is a convenient reference, lucidly describing complex ideas in various schools of logic that are traditionally not treated in a single book. The writing is fluent, clear, and detailed; the exposition is solid and successfully clarifies topics that are usually difficult for beginners to understand."--Iraj Kalantari, Western Illinois University

"This is a fine introduction to relevance and intuitionist logics and the basic notions of metalogic, with classical logic introduced as a necessary contrast. It will be a valuable addition to the literature, especially as some of the topics covered have long been the preserve of specialists. Though I have worked in philosophical logic for many years, it taught me things I should have known long ago."--Bernard Linsky, University of Alberta, author of Russell's Metaphysical Logic

"This is a very good introduction to a broad array of logics. Particularly interesting is the treatment of algebraic and topological semantics, which are only found in more advanced treatments of the same topics. The author does a great job motivating, presenting, and addressing the different formalisms."--G. Aldo Antonelli, University of California, Irvine; Editor, Journal of Philosophical Logic


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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Andrés Villaveces on November 2, 2006
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have been using quite intensively this book as part of a Logic for Philosophy Majors Class I am teaching this semester in Bogotá. The approach in the book is excellent - from the beginning it emphasizes various logics (Classical, Constructive, Fuzzy, Comparative, Relevance among others) with many examples and classical motivations (Aristotle on relevance and comparison of truth, etc.).

I particularly like the treatment of the semantics in the book - the fact it does two-valued, three-valued, integer valued, set-valued and topological-valued semantics for various logics. The treatment of the semantics is clear enough - it may be taught for second-semester students at my University.

I like a bit less the treatment of syntax - my impression is that from chapter 12 on, the book seems to provide a picture of syntax less clear, at least for the class I teach this with. That part of the book is very good for self-study and for examples, but my impression is that the treatment of syntactic aspectics is not at the level of the treatment of semantic aspects (superb in this book).

All in all, my impression is that Schechter's Classical and Nonclassical Logics (...) is excellent either as a textbook (though I prefer it in the semantics "half"), as a self-study book or as a basic clear reference of many different logics.

Warning: the book - as the complete title says - is centered on Propositional Calculus - there is essentially no Predicate Calculus. At first that seemed strange to me, but I now understand a bit better the possible reasons for the author's decision.
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