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  • Fox Horror Classics Collection (The Lodger / Hangover Square / The Undying Monster)
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Fox Horror Classics Collection (The Lodger / Hangover Square / The Undying Monster)


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Frequently Bought Together

Fox Horror Classics Collection (The Lodger / Hangover Square / The Undying Monster) + Fox Horror Classics Collection Volume 2 (Dragonwyck / Chandu the Magician / Dr. Renault's Secret) + Universal Horror: Classic Movie Archive (The Black Cat / Man Made Monster / Horror Island / Night Monster / Captive Wild Woman)
Price for all three: $41.39

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Product Details

  • Actors: Laird Cregar, Merle Oberon, Linda Darnell, George Sanders, Cedric Hardwicke
  • Directors: John Brahm
  • Writers: Barré Lyndon, Jessie Douglas Kerruish, Lillie Hayward, Marian Spitzer, Marie Belloc Lowndes
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Box set, Black & White, Dubbed, Full Screen, NTSC, Restored, Subtitled
  • Language: English (Stereo), Spanish (Mono)
  • Subtitles: English, French, Spanish
  • Dubbed: Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 3
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: 20th Century Fox
  • DVD Release Date: October 9, 2007
  • Run Time: 224 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000TLTCT0
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #50,573 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Fox Horror Classics Collection (The Lodger / Hangover Square / The Undying Monster)" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Disc 1: HANGOVER SQUARE **Full-Frame Feature B&W **Commentary by Film Historian/Screenwriter Steve Haberman and Co-Star Faye Marlowe **Commentary by Richard Schickel **The Tragic Mask: The Laird Cregar Story **Hangover Square Vintage Radio Show - Performed by Vincent Price **Restoration Comparison **Trailer **Concertos Macabre: The Films of John Brahm **Restoration Comparison **Trailer

Disc 2: THE LODGER **Full-Frame Feature - B&W **Commentary by Film Historians Alain Silver & James Ursini **Man in the Fog: The Making of The Lodger **The Lodger Vintage Radio Show - Performed by Vincent Price **Restoration Comparison **Trailer **Still Gallery

Disc 3: THE UNDYING MONSTER **Full-Frame Feature - B&W **Concertos Macabre: The Films of John Brahm *Restoration Comparison **Trailer **Advertising Gallery **Still Gallery

Amazon.com

This three-disc collection of vintage suspense from the Fox vaults not only presents three atmospheric and underrated thrillers in sparkling remastered formats, but also serves as a long-overdue tribute to the talents of director John Brahm and actor Laird Cregar, who stars in two of the three films. 1944's The Lodger is probably the best-known of the three; it's a remake of a 1926 Alfred Hitchcock film and stars Cregar as a mysterious house guest who may be Jack the Ripper. Cregar is top-billed in 1945's Hangover Square as another psychologically tormented soul; here he's a concert pianist (Bernard Herrmann composed the film's stunning concerto) who flies into a psychotic rage at the sound of a dissonant chord. And 1942's The Undying Monster is the "truest" horror title in the collection due to its werewolf plotline, but there's more than a touch of detective drama (and scientific procedural) in its frames as well. All three pictures are distinguished by German-born director Brahm, whose expressionistic visual style and emphasis on psychological terror over physical frights help to set these films apart from the monster-driven horror films coming from Universal at the same time. He's aided considerably by Cregar, who set the standard for movie madmen for decades to come. In addition to their stunning remastering, all three films feature in-depth featurettes on their principal players and histories. Concerto Macabre: The Films of John Brahm traces the director's offbeat career (after making an impact with the three films featured here, he concentrated almost exclusively on TV, where his output included stellar episodes of Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Twilight Zone and The Outer Limits), while The Tragic Mask: The Laird Cregar Story explores the oversized actor's struggle with typecasting and his homosexuality. The Lodger gets its own making-of documentary, The Man in the Attic, which explores Brahm's stunning visual compositions and Cregar's intense performance in detail. Trailers and advertising galleries for all three pictures are included, as are two complete radio adaptations of The Lodger and Hangover Square, both starring Vincent Price, who became Fox's in-house heavy after Cregar's untimely death at 31. Commentary on Hangover Square by film historians Richard Schickel and Steve Haberman with cast member Faye Marlowe, and James Ursini and Alain Silver on The Lodger, round the extras on this chill-filled set. -- Paul Gaita

Customer Reviews

And Laird Cregar was a great actor.
William Sommerwerck
To me, "Hangover Square" was easily the best of three films offered here in this "Horror Classics Collection," so I'll limit my reivew to it.
Craig Connell
Hangover Square has most of same cast as Lodger and is more film noir/mystery than horror but also very well made.
Bela

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

96 of 101 people found the following review helpful By R. Rosener VINE VOICE on October 2, 2007
Format: DVD
Three little known but effective horror films from a major hollywood studio complete this box set. Last year MGM released some of their little known horror films and now Fox has followed suite.
None of the these titles have been on DVD before, and even rarely on VHS. They occasionally showed up on the lackluster Fox Movie Channel a few years ago at odd hours of the early morning. It was on such an occasion that I encountered "The Lodger". This is a top notch effort which rests comfortably between the Gaslight thriller and the classic horror film. Cregar plays the villain with an off kilter, understated creepiness that was way ahead of it's time and could be called the screen's first serial killer performance.
The cinematography looks better and more atmospheric than what Universal was shoving out in the mid 40s'. Fog bound London streets and dimly gaslit interiors play with the viewers sense of claustrophobia. You almost feel as trapped by the heavy atmosphere as Cregar's character. Lodger is no doubt a lost classic of psychological horror.

I have to disagree with other reviewers that "Undying Monster" is the poor cousin of this set. "Hangover Square" feels more like a re-make of Lodger than a film of its own right. But Undying Monster takes us to the dark, atmospheric Sea coast. The sparse sets and jagged cliffs and caves work beautifully here. We have Jane Eyre meets Bram Stoker. A family curse is the plot engine to drive the lush monochrome cinematography. In fact Undying Monster boasts some of the best shots of the set, particularly the opening interior shot as the moon streams into a tudor drawing room. It looked great on the badly duped VHS copy I've had for years. On DVD it promises to be stunning.
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32 of 33 people found the following review helpful By mrliteral VINE VOICE on December 23, 2007
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
In the 1930s, the relatively new field of horror cinema was dominated by Universal, with its often wonderful monster movies such as Dracula, Frankenstein and the Mummy. As the Universal movies got campier in the 1940s, not many studios really filled the void. Certainly, the best of 1940s horror came from Val Lewton's pictures for RKO (Cat People, The Leopard Man and others). Fox, on the other hand, did not really have a reputation for horror in this era, as is obvious from the Fox Horror Classics set. That's not to say that they are bad movies, just that I don't know if they are really horror.

Besides being Fox movies, the three movies in this set are also tied together by all being directed by John Brahm. First made of these three - and the closest to being a horror movie - is also the weakest in the set: The Undying Monster. The story deals with the isolated Hammond family that is plagued by a curse that has a monster preying on the male Hammonds over the past few generations. This is a pale imitation of two genres made famous by Universal: the monster movie (particularly the Wolf Man) and the mystery movie (particularly the Sherlock Holmes movies, though Fox was actually the first to do the Rathbone movies). The biggest failing of the movie is the fact that the monster is on screen too infrequently.

Much better is The Lodger, a remake of what was Alfred Hitchcock's first suspense movie. Even if you've watched the older version, however, this one is still fun to watch and substantially different, plotwise. Among the big names in the movie are Merle Oberon and George Sanders, but the star is Laird Cregar who plays the title character.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Bela on October 31, 2007
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
The Fox set of classic films are just great.
The Lodger remake from 44' is awesome and
one of the better Jack the Ripper movies made.
Hangover Square has most of same cast as Lodger
and is more film noir/mystery than horror but
also very well made. Better than most. Undying
Monster was an attempt at making a wolfman movie
but it's more of a mystery movie but again very
well made and acted. I highly recommend this set.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Douglas M VINE VOICE on November 14, 2007
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This DVD collection contains 3 films from 20th Century Fox directed by German John Brahm. It would have been better if called the John Brahm Collection because only one of the films is really of the horror genre, the other 2 being psychological thrillers. The package is not as good as it might have been if a greater variety of films had been included.

"The Undying Monster" is a classy B picture with great photography, some excellent sets and a mobile camera worthy of an A. The film betrays its B status with the woeful James Ellison badly miscast as a Scotland Yard forensic expert and a melodramatic plot set in a dark house by the sea. Brahm's direction is very good in the circumstances and there are some good isolated scenes but overall, the effect is a bit corny and the plot development is truncated as befits a B film.

The other films are two book ends starring the enigmatic Laird Cregar. Cregar was a superb character actor with a complex and short life which is described in a very worthwhile documentary included in the package.

"The Lodger" is Brahm's version of Jack the Ripper with a dose of "Phantom of the Opera". Since it is obvious that Cregar plays the Ripper, the film relies on its camera angles, moody lighting and psychological implications for its suspense. Merle Oberon is the leading lady. Oberon was a wooden English actress with a clipped hostess delivery and stylish presence. As usual, she does not project much personality. She performs 2 musical hall numbers, with poor lip-synching, and one famous critic said "Merle Oberon performs the Can Can. Might we call it the Can't Can't" - hilarious but a bit harsh.
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