Red Clay (CTI Records 40th Anniversary Edition - Original Recording Remastered)

October 5, 2010 | Format: MP3

$9.99
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
12:09
30
2
7:19
30
3
8:44
30
4
10:43
30
5
10:25
30
6
18:45
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: October 5, 2010
  • Release Date: October 5, 2010
  • Label: Masterworks Jazz
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:08:05
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B0043X8SOK
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (49 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #131,950 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

75 of 78 people found the following review helpful By MurrayTheCat on December 22, 2002
Format: Audio CD
This was recorded in January of 1970. Many jazz musicians had been feeling the pressures of rock's popularity. Freddie Hubbard had occasionally experimented as early as 1966 with rock (or soul) rhythms. "Red Clay" was his first album for CTI, but it's not like his other, rock-oriented output for the label. The title cut is the only original-album tune with a rock beat. But even then, Lenny White contributes interesting stuff with quality, real-jazz interaction. Other than the organ on "Delphia," a 6/8-swing tune, Herbie Hancock plays electric piano throughout. Joe Henderson stays more in the background on those first two cuts, but the band stretches out and swings wonderfully on "Suite Sioux" and "The Intrepid Fox." Joe's solos--as usual--balance perfectly between "in" and "out." Freddie soars in typical fashion; often, it's of the can't-believe-yer-ears nature.
This music--largely because of Herbie's light touch--has an airy lilt to it: a fresh, liberated feel. The electric piano (that classic Rhodes sound) is part of it, as is Ron Carter's heady, understated bass. "Cold Turkey" (a bonus cut) gets an imaginative, and yes, groovy treatment. It's hard to sit still to it. Another bonus cut, an alternate take of "Red Clay," is added this time around, but if you already own the previous CD incarnation, I don't think you need to buy this--unless you strive for completeness. Great music, folks. This wonderful album gets my unqualified recommendation, and should please both hard-core jazz fans and those who just dabble in it.
Cheers,
Murray
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Asr on February 13, 2011
Format: Audio CD
I already had the CD release from Epic Legacy in 2002 and bought the new 2010 CTI release recently. The new release definitely has the better mastering - on the first track "Red Clay" for example, the Epic Legacy CD is fairly shrill on Hubbard's trumpet and the soundstage is also off - not much sense of "air" in the recording venue, sort of like trapped acoustics (leading to a case of apparent sound-wave reflections, like bathroom- or tunnel-type acoustics). The 2010 CTI CD smoothens out the trumpet sound along with the other instruments for a more realistic mid-range balance, with more natural recording studio-type acoustics too. You could say the new release has a fuller mid-range and deeper bass throughout. I'd say the main improvements that the new mastering brings are in the frequency spectrum balance and imaging/soundstage - definitely a more tight-knit feel to the jazz group, like the musicians are closer to each other and not as spread out. Hubbard's trumpet in particular is typically front and center, while it's more distant on the 2002 CD.

The Epic Legacy 2002 release wasn't brickwalled (as in, dynamic range compression) and thankfully the new one isn't either (checked it on my PC with Audacity after ripping it). It is a bit louder overall though, but not too obviously compressed.

IMO anyone who was unhappy with the mastering of the 2002 release should get the new CD, and I definitely recommend it. It makes the whole album sound better.
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By P Magnum HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on August 17, 2007
Format: Audio CD
Freddie Hubbard's Red Clay starts off arguably the finest stretch of trumpeter's career. The album hints at jazz-rock fusion that would take over the 1970's, but still is strongly rooted in hard bop. The title track is a beautiful piece of music with Mr. Hubbard and saxophonist Joe Henderson perfectly melding their instruments together over the top of a slithering electric piano riff from Herbie Hancock. "The Intrepid Fox" is another classic with Mr. Hancock driving the song with some superb piano work and drummer Lenny White providing a sturdy backbeat. There is also a strong funk sound throughout the album and that is a sound Mr. Hubbard would move more towards as the decade progressed.
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27 of 30 people found the following review helpful By The Groove on August 9, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Some records epitomize cool, while others help define it. "Red Clay" falls into both categories, but more so the latter. Freddie Hubbard's 1970 recording for CTI records is an incredible melange of progressive jazz, old-school soul, and a dash of blues. Like many of his peers, Hubbard's taste leaned more towards raw funk, and he adopted a "fusion" sound that was apparently very popular in that era. Although the music and production here somewhat reveals its era, it's still very much fresh and relevant. Freddie bursts into a passionate solo at the opening of the title track, before it develops into a smooth and confident instrumental, replete with a kickin' bassline from Ron Carter, and a keyboard solo from Herbie Hancock. "Suite Sioux" is a more traditional bop piece that has Hubbard and saxophonist Joe Henderson in solid form, and we also get a bold re-working of John Lennon's "Cold Turkey." But the disc's peak is saved for last: the bonus track which is an alternate version of the title cut. Performed live, this version is loose, less constructed, and more free-flowing than the original studio recording. For any lover of jazz with a progressive edge, "Red Clay" should be a no-brainer of a purchase.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Chris Massa on December 22, 1999
Format: Audio CD
Don't get me wrong. I really can't complain about Freddie Hubbard's "Red Clay," except that the mix is lousy. The drums and bass are very soft and only out the left speaker, while the sax, trumpet, and keyboards are much louder and in stereo.
Still, I'm not writing this review on the mix job, am I? I'm evaluating the performances, and they are truly superb.
Freddie Hubbard is probably my second favorite jazz trumpet player (Miles Davis being the first), and his improvising style is so wondrous. Unlike most trumpet soloists, Hubbard solos like a saxophonist in that his improvisations are is more "mind-bending" than your average brass solo. His technique and musicality are both phenomenal. The same holds true for Joe Henderson, whose tenor soars and shimmers in this recording. The rhythm section of Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter, and Lenny White is equally amazing.
What "Red Clay" really deserves is a fresh mix, and a re-release. Music this great deserves to be heard.
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