Buy New
$69.99
Qty:1
& FREE Shipping. Details
Only 3 left in stock.
Sold by discountedmediaoutlet and Fulfilled by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Cleo from 5 to 7 (The Cri... has been added to your Cart
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $11.65
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Cleo from 5 to 7 (The Criterion Collection)
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Cleo from 5 to 7 (The Criterion Collection)

38 customer reviews

Additional DVD options Amazon Price New from Used from
DVD
"Please retry"
1-Disc Version
$69.99
$69.99
$69.99 & FREE Shipping. Details Only 3 left in stock. Sold by discountedmediaoutlet and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Cleo from 5 to 7 (The Criterion Collection) + Hiroshima Mon Amour (The Criterion Collection) + 400 Blows (1959) - Essential Art House
Price for all three: $106.73

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Additional Features

Agnes Varda's Cleo From 5 to 7 wonderfully captures the vivid beauty of "everyday" Paris in the 1960s. A visual treat, this Criterion DVD release is a perfect means to view this French New Wave classic outside the theater. Agnes Varda herself supervised its digital transfer created from a 35mm fine-grain master positive. This letterboxed edition, presented in its original 1.66 aspect ratio, includes the 'telling' restored, opening color sequence with the Tarot card reader. Clearly presenting Cleo's life story through a series of antiquated images, this color sequence adds a strong dramatic contrast to the film's black and white imagery. All in all, Criterion's Cleo From 5 to 7 is a sharp presentation of a timeless classic. --Rob Bracco

Special Features

  • Restored color opening sequence

Product Details

  • Actors: Corinne Marchand, Antoine Bourseiller, Dominique Davray, Dorothée Blanck, Michel Legrand
  • Directors: Agnès Varda
  • Writers: Agnès Varda
  • Producers: Carlo Ponti, Georges de Beauregard
  • Format: Black & White, Color, Letterboxed, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: French (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono)
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: Unrated
  • Studio: Criterion
  • DVD Release Date: May 16, 2000
  • Run Time: 90 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 0780023234
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #109,582 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Cleo from 5 to 7 (The Criterion Collection)" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Daniel S. on September 23, 2000
Format: DVD
It's not so very often that I see a movie two evenings in a row, but I simply had to do it with French director Agnès Varda's CLEO FROM 5 TO 7. Because, unlike in today first and only degree movies, there is so much in it. Not only in the dialogs, but also in the way Agnès Varda has patiently built her movie ; just try to watch CLEO FROM 5 TO 7 while concentrating on what is behind the main action, observe the clocks that are always present and remind us Cléo's fate, look at the stores punctuating Cléo's race through the Paris of 1961. You have to literally read this movie.
Cléo, an addict of all kind of superstitions, will show you the way ; for her, everything and everybody knows that she is marked by illness. With her and Angèle, her guardian, you will learn how to read the signs that are surrounding you. The first scene of the movie, in a fortune-teller's apartment, is the only scene shot in colour and, in my opinion, a lesson of cinema.
Music and songs take also an important place in Agnés Varda's CLEO FROM 5 TO 7. Michel Legrand, the future composer of THE UMBRELLAS OF CHERBOURG and LES DEMOISELLES OF ROCHEFORT, plays the role of Cléo's friend and composer and delivers a superb performance. Corinne Marchand has the beauty of a French depressed Marilyn Monroe and her encounter with a returning soldier is a moment of pure freshness.
Excellent sound and images for this Criterion release but,alas, no extra-features except for english subtitles.
A DVD for your library.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By TUCO H. on September 10, 2000
Format: DVD
"Cleo from 5 to 7" was shot mostly on the streets of Paris where our beautiful heroine, a rather shallow singer and model, roams after she's taken a hypochondriac's test to see if she has cancer. Floating on the mood of doubt she has accumulated (which won't be allayed until the test results come in), she sees things with new eyes, becomes deeper and less superficial, and eventually meets up with a chance stranger who gently goads her into a new type of romance.
Varda's film isn't exactly "eccentric," "difficult" or "intellectual" as some New Wave films are, but then it's nowhere near trite or simplistic either. Above all, it's just an amazingly beautiful and poetic film, and, of course, very romantic in a patented French way. Varda being a woman, it follows logically that the so-called 'women's angle' is well represented, yet for all that, if you didn't know Varda was female, you'd probably never guess it from watching her film. It's very close in tone to her husband Jacues Demy's "Lola," early Truffaut and Chabrol's 1960 masterpiece "Les Bonnes Femmes," which also deals with women's problems, and which hardly anyone has seen since it's criminally never been released on video.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on March 20, 2004
Format: DVD
Even if French New Wave Cinema of the 1950's and 1960's is of no interest to you, don't be put off seeing this incredible film. If you do have an interest in films from this period and you haven't yet seen "Cleo" then make a promise to yourself to see this film now. Director Agnes Varda made a movie back in 1960-61 that rises above language, time, place and fashion to be a masterpiece in world cinema. In some respects this is a neglected masterpiece as it is seldom spoken in the same breath as films like "400 Blows", but that makes the pleasure of discovering it all the more sweet. Amongst the highlights - a gorgeous and clever score by Michel Legrand who makes a wonderful appearance as "Bob, the Pianist"; astonishing camerawork throughout - innumerable sequences that make you wonder "how did they do that?". Varda is such an assured filmmaker that she can turn what at first appear to be momentary lapses of energy and inspiration into ever more revealing and moving climaxes. One of the great movies. You won't regret spending a summer evening in Paris with Cleo.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By smarmer on January 27, 2004
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
The basic story of Cleo From 5 to 7 has been stated by other reviewers. In brief, it chronicles two hours in the life of Cleo, a singer, as she waits for the results of tests that will diagnose her stomach ailment. Starting with the brief Tarot Card reading (in color) -- spoiler alert -- the prediction that Cleo faces death, the film reverts to black and white. But what a masterpiece of black and white photography!
The adventures of Cleo during the two hours (real time and cinematic time) of waiting reveal the gradual peeling away of her narcissism. Another alert reviewer spoke about "reading" this film. He gave as an example the time on the clocks every time Cleo walks by one. An even more subtle and more telling example of how the visual images express the plot development and the transformation of the main character is in the reflections seen in windows and mirrors. During her more narcissistic moments at the beginning of the film we note that every time Cleo walks by a window we see her reflection, and she often notices it as well. As the film progresses the reflections in windows and mirrors gradually diminishes. By the end of the film there are no more windows and mirrors and Cleo is just her human self -- without the added narcissistic reflections.
In the last twenty minutes or so of the film Cleo has what approximates an unpretentious reloationship with an ordinary fellow, a soldier on leave who is about to return to his unit to fight in Algeria. He agrees to accompany her to the hospital where she is about to get her test results. When they arrive the doctor is not there. In resignation they walk out only to encounter the doctor leaving in his car.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?