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Clicks, Bricks & Brands Paperback – January 1, 2001

ISBN-13: 978-0749434908 ISBN-10: 0749434902 Edition: 1ST

6 New from $52.00 17 Used from $0.04 2 Collectible from $50.00
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Paperback, January 1, 2001
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Kogan Page; 1ST edition (January 1, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0749434902
  • ISBN-13: 978-0749434908
  • Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 1.1 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,163,767 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

'Lindstrom is anything but average. At just 31 he has already made a name for himself in ad-land as a clicks and mortar expert and business author.' FT.com 'If you want to transfer your brand to the electronic age and want a sensible plan to prevent damage, this is the book to provide it.' Marketing Business 'Martin Lindstrom understood the wisdom of the Net before most of us. Now he's sharing his best wisdom with you. Don't miss out.' Seth Godin, author of Permission Marketing ' An eye-opening exploration of the changing face of retailing on the Net and in the high street.' Practical Internet 'Innovative and novel approach to 21st century 'writing'-a virtual must read' George Vrandenburg III, Senior Vice President & General Counsel, AOL Time Warner 'Lindstrom has collected and analysed the data from generation one of the online merchandising experience, and built the manual for the next generational leap. Must reading.' David Scott Carlick, Co-founder of Double-Click, Partner at VantagePoint Venture Partners.

From the Publisher

Martin Lindstrom is recognized as one of the world’s primary clicks & mortar branding gurus. Having started his first Internet business when he was 12 years old, by the age of 27 he had co-founded both Europe’s (BBDO Interactive, now Framfab) and Australia/Asia’s (ZIVO) largest web-development agencies. Now 31, with a global reputation as a foremost commentator on branding and Internet issues, his popular weekly columns reach a global audience of more than 4 million people in 20 countries. He has consulted for numerous top companies including LEGO, Mars, Pepsi, American Express and VISA. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

When he was a kid growing up in Denmark, Martin Lindstrom had but one thought in his life: Lego. He was, to put it simply, obsessed with Lego. He hand-built and slept on a Lego bed. He dressed in Lego's colors. He even turned the family garden into his very own Legoland creation, a miniature village complete with bonsai trees, scooped out canals, and dozens of houses and ships constructed entirely out of LEGO.

Then one bright summer's day in 1982, ambitious 11-year-old Martin Lindstrom opened Legoland's doors, optimistically anticipating hoards of visitors from near and far. Not a single person showed up.

Aware that something more than mere brilliant design was needed to attract visitors, young Martin suddenly had a flash of inspiration: he would advertise! He promptly persuaded the local newspaper to run an ad, and sure enough, the following week 131 people streamed through the garden gate. Including two lawyers from LEGO, who very politely informed Martin that if he persisted in using the name 'LEGOLAND' he would be guilty of trademark infringement. That's when he first realized the seductive power of marketing and advertising.

So Martin decided to open his own advertising agency, which he succeeded in doing a couple of months later, at the ripe age of 12. And thus, a lifelong relationship with marketing and brands was born.

After selling his agency in 1988, Lindstrom attended the Academy of Advertising before joining international giant, BBDO. In 1994 he went on to form the groups first interactive agency; BBDO Interactive, and three years later he founded BBDO Interactive Asia Pacific, both agencies growing to become the largest Internet solution companies in their respective regions. By the age of 30, Lindstrom had become one of the most respected names in the industry.

He has since spent 300 days on the road annually sharing his brand of wisdom and pioneering methodologies through speaking engagements and his role as trusted advisor to countless high profile companies, celebrities and royal families.

In 2009, amidst the rubble of the economic meltdown, Lindstrom opened a new chapter. Disheartened by much that he had seen on the front lines of the branding wars for the last two decades, he decided to turn the spotlight inward, and reveal all he'd learned along his journey from 11-year old Lego enthusiast to one of the globe's foremost marketing experts. His goal? By exposing the best kept tricks and secrets of the marketing world, and opening our eyes to all the ways in which we, as consumers, are being manipulated and deceived, he would help each one learn to resist the siren song of advertising and make smarter, more informed decisions about how we spend our money. The goal is to prepare brands for a more transperent and honest appraoch where secrets no longer will be possible and thus transperancy is needed. Brandwashed is the culmination of this ambitious undertaking.

Lindstrom has been featured and continues to be featured in the Wall Street Journal, Newsweek, The Economist, New York Times, BusinessWeek, The Washington Post, USAToday, Forbes and Harvard Business Review. He also frequently appears on NBC's TODAY show, ABC News, CNN Money, CBS, Bloomberg, FOX & Friends, Discovery Channel and the BBC. Lindstrom also pens a weekly column for Fast Company and TIME Magazine and appears regularly America's #1 ranking morning TV show, The TODAY Show, as an expert on consumer awareness and advocacy. In 2011 Lindstrom appeared in the Morgan Spurlock (Supersize Me0 documentary: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold.

His latest book, Brandwashed (Crown) is based on a 3-month long, $3 million guerilla marketing experiment, exploring the most powerful hidden persuader of them all. Us!

Buyology (paperback released February 2010 by Crown Publishing), was voted "pick of the year" by USA Today, and, between 2008 and 2009, reached ten of the top 10 bestseller lists in the U.S. and worldwide. His 6 books have been translated into more than 40 languages and published in more than 60 countries globally.

In 2009, TIME Magazine, named Lindstrom one of the World's 100 Most Influential People for his groundbreaking work on neuroscience and branding.

Visit MartinLindstrom.com to learn more.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Ellen Hale on January 18, 2002
Format: Paperback
Lindstrom draws on speeches he's given in worldwide and textbook basics to craft an informative and refreshing marketing text. Highlighting the primary tools and techniques used by marketing professionals, he encourages companies to think about the true value of a clicks and mortar approach. Since it's cheaper to retain an existing customer than to acquire a new one, companies should use all of the resources at their disposal - including marketing - in building long-term clicks and mortar relationships. Beyond the customer-value sermon, Lindstrom offers a systemic review of clicks and mortar concepts that have been very useful for me and which I can heartily recommend to beginners, who quickly will find their copies of this book glowing with highlighter yellow, as well as marketing veterans, who will enjoy and learn from the book's fresh take on familiar topics.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 18, 2001
Format: Paperback
I've have seen Martin Lindstrom at work for years and I'm not impressed.
His presentations and articles could appear in Cleo or Cosmo. The headline is intriguing but there is very little substance to them. Dig a little deeper and you find they are based on obvious trends, vast generalizations and marketing textbook ideas.
Zivo, which Martin ran in Australia, was renowned in the Industry for making grand promises at high prices with appalling implementation. While they were very successful for a while they got very little repeat business and the whole thing became a commercial disaster well before the dot com crash. This is probably why he had to go back to Europe for his next job.
Martin's real talent is as a sales man and self-promoter. He was one of the loudest carnival sprukers of the "dot com" era, proclaiming to one and all that the Internet was the miracle cure for all their corporate ills.
Martin seems to have a good grasp of e-marketing at the highest level but he is dangerously useless on business models, technology and implementation.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 27, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book is ostensibly, about the world's most controversial marriage. No, not a celebrity power wedding, but the union of offline and online business. It seems not so long since books like this were urging businesses to flock to the web, but now the brakes are on. A new business model has risen from the ashes of the dotcoms: the marriage of bricks-and-mortar to the internet. Lindstrom whips readers through a potted history of the retail industry - the shopping evolution, as he terms it. A paragraph on the 1950s, half a page on the 1960s, a couple of case studies, a paragraph each on the 1980s and 1990s, and whammo, by page 10 we are into the age of the internet. But if detail is lacking, Lindstrom's argument is strong. By tracing the evolution of retail in this way he sets the scene for the e-tailing hype storm, pinpointing Christmas 1999 as the key test. 'The 2000 holiday season told a graphic tale,' he writes. 'More than 90 per cent of e-tailers closed down in the period up to January, 2001.' Each of the chapters in Clicks, Bricks and Brands is followed by a summary of the main points covered - useful for revision - and action points. For example, the action points at the end of The Power Shift (Chapter One), exhort the reader to do a SWOT analysis of their own and competitors' businesses. 'Summarise your business's strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats. Determine what threats your offline or online store is facing from your competitors and what features would be most likely to lure your customers to your competitor.' This is before we get into the substance of the book - the meat and potatoes of clicks and mortar. Even if it all seems a bit Cleo magazine (does your boyfriend really love you?), the self-analysis you will have accumulated by the end of the book should be formidable.Read more ›
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 17, 2001
Format: Paperback
What a remarkable and refreshing perspective on how to leverage the best from both worlds. I read this book after seeing it in the 'also read' section of another title I was searching for. It melded flawlessly with a solution and philosophy I believed in and had long been trying to create for our brand. The book goes beyond marketing into customer service, retention, and recurring sales. I believe it dovetails seamlessly into the sales technique of how you make such two different worlds work together. Definitely, a must read for those who believe that how you treat a customer is important no matte what channel they use.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Gary Mihoces on January 18, 2002
Format: Paperback
A concise overview on clicks and mortar principles is provided by the book. Despite the condensed nature of its content, many illustrative examples are given throughout the chapters. It serves well as a great introduction for readers who are planning to establish a clicks and mortar program.
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