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Climbing Higher Hardcover – January 6, 2004


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: NAL Hardcover; First Edition edition (January 6, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451211596
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451211590
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (54 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #357,902 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Montel Williams has established himself as a top player in the competitive daytime talk show arena since his debut in 1991. He is also a decorated former Naval intelligence officer and a renowned motivational speaker, author, actor, and philanthropist. He is the creator of The Montel Williams MS Foundation.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter One

"You Have MS."

I'm in the intensive care unit of Beth Israel North waiting to go into surgery, where I have a 50 percent chance of dying. The blood vessel leading to my sinuses is ten times the size it should be and blood has been pouring out of my nose for nearly a month. There are tubes going in and out of me, connected to a heart monitor. The cauterization inside my nose suddenly bursts and blood starts shooting like a jet stream across the bed. I look at the heart monitor and see the numbers go from 65 to 58, to 50, 40, 29. My blood pressure is 80/10. The monitor starts making noises and just before it flatlines I shout for the doctor. I don't want to die, but the machine shows 0 as I pass out. I'm dead.

But somehow I'm aware of what's going on around me and I'm freaked out. There are four doctors trying to revive me. And one stranger, a strange sort of apparition cloaked in a shroud. Is it an angel? Am I going to be escorted to the white light? The figure approaches me and softly says, "Montel, Montel, you need to calm the fuck down."

The doctors aren't aware of this stranger. I don't know who he is-I'm not even sure it's a he-but he's not like any angel I ever imagined. Whoever it is, it makes me laugh.

"What are you talking about?" I say. I'm laughing because here is my big deathbed scene and I get an angel with a filthy mouth. I'm dying and he's telling me to stay calm?

"You heard me," he says again. "If I don't tell it to you this way you are not going to listen. So calm the fuck down. It's not your time. You've still got too many things to accomplish." One of the doctors, Dr. Swarup, grabs my chest with his fingers and twists my skin hard enough to leave a bruise. "Montel!" he shouts. "Wake up! Wake up!"

Another doctor starts yelling as well. "Who are you talking to? You've got to calm down!"

"That's what he just said," I murmur and point to the apparition.

When I finally calm down, I look up and it's gone. My four doctors bring me back.

The next morning the anesthesiologist comes to prepare me for surgery. I say to her, "Make sure I wake up from this." I want to live. I'm not sure if what happened the day before is something that I imagined to ease my concern about dying or if it was truly a visitation, but I feel a sense of calm that I haven't felt for a very long time.

It isn't going to last.

Ten months later, in February of 1999, I flew to Salt Lake City, Utah, to appear in an episode of the TV show Touched by an Angel. On the plane, I got up to use the bathroom, and when I returned I stumbled and fell into the seat next to Grace, my wife. Our relationship was not at a high point and now what the hell was this? A searing pain had swept through my legs from the knees to the feet as if they had been scalded by a blowtorch. It wasn't a momentary fire but a continuous one. My feet felt like someone had taken a sharp, pointed branding iron and stuck it not just between my toes but through them. The pain was so excruciating I didn't think I would be able to walk, let alone act. But I also knew that I had made a commitment to do the show and I felt obligated to honor that commitment.

I work out with a trainer every morning, and a day earlier I had trained with somebody new doing a different type of leg workout. I thought that I must have done something horribly wrong in my workout. Every hour for the next two days, my legs and feet hurt more. We were staying with a very close friend of mine, Dr. Andy Hines, who is a plastic surgeon. I told him about the pain and that I thought I might have really screwed up my back. By then my feet had gone numb, as had a small spot on my side from my hip to the bottom of my rib cage. I also felt pain in my stomach that was taking my breath away. Andy told Grace he suspected I had a neurological disorder but he didn't say anything to me because he knew I had to work the next day.

I didn't want to tell anybody that I was hurting the first day on the set because then they'd have to cancel the shoot, and that would probably be the last guest-starring appearance I'd ever get. So I took six Tylenol, sucked it up and went to work. When anyone asked what was wrong, I said I pinched a nerve in my back from working out and it would be no problem.

It should have been a fun shoot. It was a beautiful day. The air was clear, the sun was shining. My love interest was Cynthia Nixon, who had just signed a deal for Sex and the City. I was playing a juicy role, a cult leader who was destined to go straight to hell. We had two tough scenes that day. One was the opening, in which I was recruiting people to come with me to my compound. I had to walk up and down the aisles in front of twenty or thirty people giving a long speech. If you ever see this episode, don't be fooled; what may appear to be intense Acting with a capital A is actually physical pain. Every step I took was so painful I had to clasp my hands in front of me and squeeze as hard as I could to deflect how much my feet hurt.

I got back to Andy's around five p.m. and collapsed. I had the next day off, which was a relief because I woke up in even worse pain. "I really want you to go see a friend of mine," Andy said. "He's a neurologist and he may be able to explain some of this." Then he casually asked if anyone had ever mentioned multiple sclerosis to me.

"Yeah," I said, "but I know it's not that. Twenty years ago I had a doctor in the marines suggest I should be tested for MS. Turned out it disappeared. Six years ago, same thing: this doctor in Las Vegas put me through an MRI [magnetic resonance imager], thought it was MS, sent me to an eye clinic in Philadelphia. The top doctor there looked at the MRI and said those people were crazy: it wasn't MS-it was an inner-ear infection I had caught from swimming in the bay. Once these doctors see the kind of shape I'm in and understand the kind of power weight lifting I do, they know I'm no victim of disease. I just get these damn pains and need something to stop them."

I looked at Andy and saw he wasn't buying it. And that kind of took me aback, because I am where I am today because of my self-assurance, the power of my conviction; it's the power of who I am. If Albert Einstein were alive today and came on my show, I probably could argue him out of being so sure that e equals mc squared.

But there was no talking my way out of the pain I was feeling, so Andy's sister-in-law Wendy drove me to the neurologist in Salt Lake City. She had to drive because I was hurting so bad I could not put my foot on the gas pedal.

The doctor's office was in one of those executive centers that look like a strip mall. I was expecting him to give me some pain medication and send me on my way. I wasn't expecting him to turn my life upside down.

He said that from what Andy had told him and seeing me walk, he knew exactly what was wrong, but he didn't say what it was and I didn't ask. He did a quick eye exam, holding up fingers for me to count; told me to bend over; and had me remove my pants so he could conduct some needle tests to check my legs.

I told him I had been on some medication for the past few months because I had been urinating a lot. I also said that I was having trouble releasing my bowels-I would try to go six times in a row but nothing happened. He just nodded. These were classic symptoms of the disease I didn't yet know I had.

He began sticking needles into my feet.

"What do you feel?"

"Nothing."

He poked me in the legs, drawing blood. "Do you feel this?"

"No."

He poked some more. I didn't feel anything.

For the first time I began to face how seriously numb I had gone in various places on my body. Two years before this I had burned myself on the space heater in my office, a second-degree burn, and I didn't even know it. I'd had a car back over my foot and didn't realize it until a half hour later when my foot started hurting.

The doctor then checked my cremasteric reflex, which is supposed to make the genitals move when the thigh is touched in a certain spot. Mine didn't. "I can tell you without doing any further tests that you have MS," he said. Just like that. Very matter-of-fact.

What the hell was he talking about, MS? Even though I'd heard those two letters before, I barely knew what MS was. I thought it was the disease Jerry Lewis was always raising money to defeat. Kids in wheelchairs. I was an adult. I couldn't have that. I didn't know anything about MS. I thought it was muscular dystrophy.

He asked if I knew any other neurologists I trusted. Now I was back on more solid ground. "Sure, I have a doctor at Harvard, Dr. Allen Counter, who could help set up appointments with a neurologist there." He had invited me up to Harvard to speak on African-Americans and minorities in the media two months earlier, and had impressed me as one of the true treasures of this country. He was a neurophysiologist at Harvard Medical School who had been the director of the Harvard Foundation for more than two decades. I was dropping Dr. Counter's name as if to let this doctor know I knew real doctors who could counter his cocksure diagnosis.

"Then you ought to go to Harvard," he said, "because you have MS-there's no question."

I gave him a look of infinite hatred ... and broke down. Tears have always come easily for me, but this time I was crying at the thought of my own funeral. My kids were going to be robbed of their dad. My hopes of fulfilling the old high school yearbook prediction of one day residing at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue were instantly crushed. This black man wasn't going to be the first African-American president. He was just going to be one dead talk show host. My tears clearly made the doctor uncomfortable. "Don't cry," he said. "There's nothing you can do about it."

Thanks a lot, I thought, and I cried even more. I've had doctors look me in the face and just because I had convinced them that they...

--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

This book is a very easy read and I have to say I really enjoyed it.
Brit_Girl
I have since read many other question and answer books and fact books but reading about someone who was so willing to open up completely provided hope.
Linda A. Sanders
It's fast reading and I've read it twice and the book is nearby to read it again.
Reddobie71

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

136 of 138 people found the following review helpful By Brit_Girl on January 10, 2004
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is a very easy read and I have to say I really enjoyed it. I was never a great big fan of his because he was always the Pollyanna type believing a good attitude and a strong belief system will get you through anything. That always irritates me and pushes my buttons!
In Climbing Higher he is very frank about his road trip with MS. How he felt right after being diagnosed. He talks about his career and childhood briefly, his symptoms and marriage & relationship problems.
I won't spoil the details of the book for those who want to read it but will only give a brief overview if you will. His main problems are bad vision in one eye, burning painful feet and difficulty walking when the pain is at the 10 level (which he says is often).
He also experiences the electric pain where a touch or even water is excruciating. He also has difficulties sexually. He's very frank and it's refreshing to see he does have bad days and is not the Pollyanna he used to portray. He's very emotional and admits to crying a lot (this is a big admission for a man as most won't come clean about tears).
His attitude is that MS can kill ones spirit especially if one is emotionally weak (and who isn't these days in this world) and he realizes there are still others far worse than him so he thanks his lucky stars most mornings when he wakes up.
He is a very confident, over achiever and some see this as arrogant.
I now see him in a different light and I like him. What his core message is MS does indeed suck but we have to fight whatever hand we are given and hope for a better tomorrow.
He is very big on congress allowing medical mj and decriminalizing it.
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42 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Christopher A. Jones on March 4, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I was recently diagnosed with MS, and have been wanting to find more information about the disease, and as Montel states, it is hard to find any type of concensus on this disease. His roundtable discussion at the end of the book was a stroke of genius, and I found it very informative.
Most of the book was great, and it made the best arguement for legalization of medical marijuana research that I have ever heard. Also, I happen to live in Utah, and I have had a great experience with my neurologist. Just wanted to let everyone know that not all Utah doctors are like the one that he had to deal with.
Overall, this is a great book. Another book I would recommend is Lance Armstrongs "It's Not About the Bike". Montel made me feel better because I could relate to his symptoms and feelings, however Lance's book is a great story of fighting for life, despite increadible odds. They are both great books that help people understand what it means to fight to overcome life threatening and/or debilitating diseases.
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31 of 31 people found the following review helpful By The RAWSISTAZ Reviewers on January 14, 2005
Format: Hardcover
For over ten years Montel Williams has visited our homes through his daily talk show The Montel Williams Show. When he was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis (MS), he initially tried to hide his illness and his pain from his family and his fans. Eventually, he was forced to share a deeply personal struggle with his family and the public. Since his diagnosis, Montel has struggled with unbearable physical pain, depression, and countless other MS symptoms. At the same time, he was trying to balance his professional obligations, care for his children, and cope with a failing marriage. By no means was any of this easy for him, in fact on more than one occasion he nearly committed suicide; but through perseverance, support and hard work he has continued pushing forward.

In an effort to educate others, he candidly shares some of the most personal aspects of his life. In addition to talking about how MS has impacted him personally, Montel shares some of the issues surrounding the disease. He talks about the lack of research on the disease; the exorbitant cost of drugs used to treat its symptoms, and provides a rather lengthy argument for the need to legalize the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes. At the conclusion of the book, he includes a round table discussion with several physicians well-known in the area of MS. He asks all kinds of questions of these experts, ranging from the potential causes of the disease, various traditional and non-traditional treatments, and diet.

CLIMBING HIGHER is so much more than a book about MS because in addition to talking about his personal challenges with the disease, Montel sprinkles in a lot of his general life experiences. This made the book more interesting, and definitely made it a more personal read.
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38 of 39 people found the following review helpful By A .J. Casper on April 22, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I am not a fan of Montell at all, and I don't watch his show. I don't know what made me pick this book, but I'm glad I read it. The book was not what I expected at all. I had never heard of MS prior to reading this book. It was short and to the point. He makes some compelling arguments for the legalization of marijuana and the benefits and disadvantages of some other drugs. I felt his pain as I read the book. I felt every spasm, frustration, and fatigue episode. This will be a helpful read for MS sufferers. I hope a cure is found soon. I also hope that those who do not have MS will pick up the book and understand not just the nature of the ailment, but also those who live with it daily.
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