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33 of 33 people found the following review helpful
on January 29, 2010
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
Clinically Oriented Anatomy is, without a doubt, the best anatomy text I have come across thus far. And at this point, I've got a shelf full of anatomy books. The writing is very clear and in nearly every passage, easy to follow. Sometimes the descriptions get a bit confusing if you aren't comfortable yet with anatomical orientation (superomedial, aborad, etc) but that will come with any anatomy text - it's part of the process of learning anatomy. The passages are far more easy to read than Gray's Anatomy for Students, and the blue box clinical correlates and sectional summaries do an excellent job tying things together. At the end of a given section, I always find myself coming away with a very solid understanding of the material I've just read.

It has been mentioned in other comments that the illustrations are not the best. And I agree with that. But this is a text, not an atlas, and therein lies the difference. The illustrations are meant to provide general orientation and understanding. The illustrations in Gray's Anatomy for Students are generally better than in this book, but they pale in comparison to any of the real atlases out there in content and detail. For true details and spatial comprehension, you need a real atlas. I'm preferential to Thieme for illustrations (the neurovasculature illustrations are just incredible) and Rohen for photographic images.

Combine a great text with one or two great atlases. That's the only way to truly learn anatomy.
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45 of 53 people found the following review helpful
on August 16, 2010
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
I don't see how this book has almost five stars. In my first semester med school anatomy class everyone had this textbook (as it was recommended by the school). After the first month maybe 2 students still used it (out of 100 students). If you already know your anatomy and have a strong background, then this book will be great. If you are new to the game then all you really need is the gray's students edition for the introduction, the netters atlas for clarification, and the brs for details.

Dont be fooled by the whole 'clinically oriented' part, it's not as great as you think. The brs will explain these same fractures/diseases much faster and clearer...on top of that the brs online aspect supplies MANY more questions. AVOID.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on September 17, 2009
Format: Paperback
This book is very thorough with detailed pictures and explanations. It is well worth the money. I also bought Netter's, which is amazing, but is only pictures, no text. If you have little money, buy this one, not both and certainly not just Netter's.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on August 25, 2009
Format: Paperback
If you have time, you should read this textbook in order to completely understand clinical anatomy. If you don't have time (like most of us), then the blue boxes are indispensable. The pictures throughout the text are a great complement to Netter's atlas. Great text!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on December 19, 2012
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
I have decided to start ordering electronic books as much as possible so I do not have to carry them around when I need them on travel. The quality of the pictures in the book are not good. When you click on them for a larger image it is blurry. It is difficult to follow the book too. The figures are not along the book as you would expect when reading. If you want to see the figure that is associated with the reading you have to click on the figure link and it brings you to a different page. It's just not efficient in my opinion. I really like the hard copy book and have had them since PT school. There is a lot of great material in the book. However, I would rather stick with the hard copy version of this instead unless they format this better.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on August 21, 2009
Format: Paperback
Good book with nice illustrations. Minor oversight on a few illustrations (EX: where the Maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve exits the visocranium).
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on December 23, 2010
Format: Paperback
This was our recommended/required text for medical school anatomy. It was also the first year this text was the recommendation- it had been Gray's Anatomy for Students in previous years. I started the block using this and after the first few quizzes and first exam I felt like this book was a poor suggestion. On a classmate's advice I picked up Gray's and was immediately swayed. Concepts that I had completely missed in Moore were as clear as could be in Gray's. The diagrams in Gray's are clearer and have the information you need. The practice questions available through Gray's online resource are also priceless for preparing for block exams. I wish I had just gone straight to Gray's to begin with.
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23 of 32 people found the following review helpful
on April 30, 2009
Format: Paperback
I am not a big fan of this textbook.
Nothing was concise, things were confusing.
If you have to know the branches of the arteries and nerves, it'll be impossible to use this book.
Get something like Thieme or BRS, more to the point (especially BRS). Pictures weren't that great either (granted its no sobotta, but still)
It is however still "clinically oriented" so depends on the university and their teachings.
I find it impossible to memorize anything from this or even make good notes.
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10 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on June 2, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book was on the "required" list for first year med students, so I picked one up without really looking into it. My two biggest complaints were deal breakers for me and drove me nuts. The first was that a lot of the information on similar topics was scattered throughout the book. Professors had to assign pages that went something like this, pages: 240-243, 356-359, 656-658, and 1112-1114. The authors babbled a little about each topic throughout the book making this necessary. The second was by far the worst: you're reading along and the text refers to figure 2.1 (for example) and figure 2.1 is where?? 3 or 4 pages ahead of what you're reading. So you have to flip back and forth in order to study both the text and the image to get what they're saying. This is not an isolated condition either, it occurs frequently throughout the book and makes studying VERY frustrating. I do not doubt that the authors know what they are talking about. The information is solid and relevant for medical education, but their presentation/organization of it is very poor
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on September 6, 2011
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
This book hold the same info or very close to same in for as grays anatomy, it is just much easier to read then grays.
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