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CloneBrews, 2nd Edition: Recipes for 200 Brand-Name Beers Paperback – May 10, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 439 pages
  • Publisher: Storey Publishing, LLC; 2 edition (May 10, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 160342539X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1603425391
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (93 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #29,130 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Mark Szamatulski has been the co-owner and operator of Maltose Express since 1990.  He and his wife Tess have written the books Clone Brews and Beer Captured.  These books each give homebrew recipes for commercial beers and help the home beer maker to brew great beers on the first attempt.  Mark and Tess have written the Style column for Brew Your Own magazine, where they are on the Editorial Board, and have contributed many articles to the publication.  Their beers have been awarded many medals in homebrew contests, and have had their beers put on the tap of a local brewery.  Time.com has filmed their store for its website, and they were the subject of a Discovery Channel segment on homebrewing which was featured on the show “How Stuff Is Made.”

Customer Reviews

This is a great book for a collection of home brew recipes.
PT Ben
If you're a home brewer, just getting started or just like beer . . . . this book is a great addition to your library.
Christopher Palazini
If this sounds in any way like you, you'll probably love it.
Kevin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 35 people found the following review helpful By David G. Aubrey on October 22, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I am a big fan of this book, as I am a relatively new home brewer and the many recipes here give me ample examples to select from. I also am learning what ingredients go with what style of beer, so I can create my own. My son-in-law had this book, and I bought an on-line copy so we didn't keep fighting over who got to keep Brian's dog-eared copy. This book was delivered as scheduled. I like the appendices in the book: examples major types of grains (too few, actually) and additives/specialty grains. The hops table that provides some alternatives to hops in case of missing items is especially useful (though this table does not agree with many on-line resources).
My issue is that there are missing bits and pieces to this e-book compared to the actual printed book. To a home brewer, these are critical issues. My first brew that I used this book on was a Duvel. Compare the Duvel from the hard copy and the soft copy. Important information missing from the soft copy. I brew using all-grain, not extract, and this Duvel leaves out the important section on what base grains to use in place of the less satisfactory (to my tastes) and more expensive (no argument here) DME extracts. The printed version has a nice section following each recipe discussing what all grain brewers should use in terms of base grains.
If this is my first attempt at using the book, and there are issues that make me run down my hard copy again, I fear that there are many more. This book needs to be re-edited and then re-published electronically, at no cost to those of us who bought this book in e-book format.
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17 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Nick Kiest on March 20, 2012
Format: Paperback
I find 3 main issues with this book.
1. Lots of wasted space. There are 69 pages of light lagers from around the world. The receipts are almost identical, with very slight difference in hops and gravity. Every single lager (56) has the exact same lagering procedure, even when they should be treated differently. All styles repeat the same data (Serving notes, bottle conditioning) over and over. I think they really pushed to have 200 recipes and 440 pages. The food pairings seem like rather random filler to me.
2. The key difference in many beers is how they are mashed, fermented, or conditioned/lagered. This book often mentions those difference in the blurb, but then fails to follow through in the process. For instance, it will mention in the blurb that it is lagered for 3 months, and then say lager 1 month in the instructions. Or say that it is decoction mashed, and then specify an infusion mash for all grain. All fermentation temps are identical for all beers in a style, with no advice on what would be best for the recipe or a given yeast.
3. There are a large number of mismatches between the extract with grains, mini-mash, and all grain recipes that seem like errors. For example, on page 209, the mini-mash has flaked maize, but the all-grain has no corn of any sort.

Most brewers would be much better treated by Brewing Classic Styles: 80 Winning Recipes Anyone Can Brew, which explains the styles underlying this book much better, and then provides great tips on mashing, fermenting, and all the other processes that can make a beer taste different.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By PT Ben on March 4, 2011
Format: Paperback
This is a great book for a collection of home brew recipes.

With the addition of 50 new recipes along with new layout and organization this book is darn near perfect.

The only knock is over detailed times of hop additions.

If you've brewed a batch or 2 of brew you understand the process however, this book breaks it down to an exact step by step process.

This book is a huge improvement over their first book and I would recommend it to any beginning or intermediate brewer.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By J. Thomas Vincent on August 1, 2010
Format: Paperback
Confession, I don't spend much time reading clone books or articles. I respect the effort to recreate ones favorite beer, but if someone has already made a beer you love, why not support them. There are times however when you can't get your favorite beers due to distance or distributor issues, in cases like that brewing a clone may be your only option.

Clone Brews by Tess and Mark Szamatulski has been revised and expanded from 150 to 200 beers. The book has also been given a facelift. The book features a more stylish look and more space for each beer recipe, from a single page to two pages. The new look includes a map showing the hometown of where the beer is brewed, serving notes about the beer (proper serving temperature, shelf life, glassware, etc), and potential food beer pairings. It still includes step by step directions and mashing options on the recipes.

If I have any complaints about the book it's something you may only face when you enter a homebrew shop to purchase your recipe. The book lists the ingredients only at each step and not anywhere in a total for the recipe. While that is handy in the brewing process, but most people utilizing these books tend to shop with book in hand I have observed. There is no clear 'to buy' list and that causes homebrewers confusion over what exactly they need to buy and what quantities. It's a minor quibble but one I have noticed on regular occasion.

Overall this is an impressive update to the book with a more modern look and feel, I think it will be popular with homebrewers for years to come.
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