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93 Reviews
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better than the original
This is a great book for a collection of home brew recipes.

With the addition of 50 new recipes along with new layout and organization this book is darn near perfect.

The only knock is over detailed times of hop additions.

If you've brewed a batch or 2 of brew you understand the process however, this book breaks it down to an exact step by...
Published on March 4, 2011 by PT Ben

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33 of 35 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Sloppy editing
I am a big fan of this book, as I am a relatively new home brewer and the many recipes here give me ample examples to select from. I also am learning what ingredients go with what style of beer, so I can create my own. My son-in-law had this book, and I bought an on-line copy so we didn't keep fighting over who got to keep Brian's dog-eared copy. This book was...
Published on October 22, 2012 by David G. Aubrey


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33 of 35 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Sloppy editing, October 22, 2012
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This review is from: CloneBrews, 2nd Edition: Recipes for 200 Commercial Beers (Kindle Edition)
I am a big fan of this book, as I am a relatively new home brewer and the many recipes here give me ample examples to select from. I also am learning what ingredients go with what style of beer, so I can create my own. My son-in-law had this book, and I bought an on-line copy so we didn't keep fighting over who got to keep Brian's dog-eared copy. This book was delivered as scheduled. I like the appendices in the book: examples major types of grains (too few, actually) and additives/specialty grains. The hops table that provides some alternatives to hops in case of missing items is especially useful (though this table does not agree with many on-line resources).
My issue is that there are missing bits and pieces to this e-book compared to the actual printed book. To a home brewer, these are critical issues. My first brew that I used this book on was a Duvel. Compare the Duvel from the hard copy and the soft copy. Important information missing from the soft copy. I brew using all-grain, not extract, and this Duvel leaves out the important section on what base grains to use in place of the less satisfactory (to my tastes) and more expensive (no argument here) DME extracts. The printed version has a nice section following each recipe discussing what all grain brewers should use in terms of base grains.
If this is my first attempt at using the book, and there are issues that make me run down my hard copy again, I fear that there are many more. This book needs to be re-edited and then re-published electronically, at no cost to those of us who bought this book in e-book format.
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17 of 21 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Errors, repetitive, minimal process, March 20, 2012
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I find 3 main issues with this book.
1. Lots of wasted space. There are 69 pages of light lagers from around the world. The receipts are almost identical, with very slight difference in hops and gravity. Every single lager (56) has the exact same lagering procedure, even when they should be treated differently. All styles repeat the same data (Serving notes, bottle conditioning) over and over. I think they really pushed to have 200 recipes and 440 pages. The food pairings seem like rather random filler to me.
2. The key difference in many beers is how they are mashed, fermented, or conditioned/lagered. This book often mentions those difference in the blurb, but then fails to follow through in the process. For instance, it will mention in the blurb that it is lagered for 3 months, and then say lager 1 month in the instructions. Or say that it is decoction mashed, and then specify an infusion mash for all grain. All fermentation temps are identical for all beers in a style, with no advice on what would be best for the recipe or a given yeast.
3. There are a large number of mismatches between the extract with grains, mini-mash, and all grain recipes that seem like errors. For example, on page 209, the mini-mash has flaked maize, but the all-grain has no corn of any sort.

Most brewers would be much better treated by Brewing Classic Styles: 80 Winning Recipes Anyone Can Brew, which explains the styles underlying this book much better, and then provides great tips on mashing, fermenting, and all the other processes that can make a beer taste different.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better than the original, March 4, 2011
By 
This is a great book for a collection of home brew recipes.

With the addition of 50 new recipes along with new layout and organization this book is darn near perfect.

The only knock is over detailed times of hop additions.

If you've brewed a batch or 2 of brew you understand the process however, this book breaks it down to an exact step by step process.

This book is a huge improvement over their first book and I would recommend it to any beginning or intermediate brewer.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Solid update to a homebrewing staple, August 1, 2010
Confession, I don't spend much time reading clone books or articles. I respect the effort to recreate ones favorite beer, but if someone has already made a beer you love, why not support them. There are times however when you can't get your favorite beers due to distance or distributor issues, in cases like that brewing a clone may be your only option.

Clone Brews by Tess and Mark Szamatulski has been revised and expanded from 150 to 200 beers. The book has also been given a facelift. The book features a more stylish look and more space for each beer recipe, from a single page to two pages. The new look includes a map showing the hometown of where the beer is brewed, serving notes about the beer (proper serving temperature, shelf life, glassware, etc), and potential food beer pairings. It still includes step by step directions and mashing options on the recipes.

If I have any complaints about the book it's something you may only face when you enter a homebrew shop to purchase your recipe. The book lists the ingredients only at each step and not anywhere in a total for the recipe. While that is handy in the brewing process, but most people utilizing these books tend to shop with book in hand I have observed. There is no clear 'to buy' list and that causes homebrewers confusion over what exactly they need to buy and what quantities. It's a minor quibble but one I have noticed on regular occasion.

Overall this is an impressive update to the book with a more modern look and feel, I think it will be popular with homebrewers for years to come.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Updated, revised and new - all in one., July 1, 2010
By 
The 2nd edition of Mark & Tess Szamatulski's book "Clone Brews" has had a complete make over.

The new layout is updated and easy to read with refreshed recipes from the previous book adjusting for some ingredients (yeasts, hops, etc) that in some cases are no longer available. Also, they've added 50 new beer clone recipes to the book.

If you're a home brewer, just getting started or just like beer . . . . this book is a great addition to your library.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sweet!, July 3, 2012
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Great book if you enjoy cold beer and brewing your own at home. Easy to follow. Shipped quickly. Pleased with this purchase.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 2nd Edition is great, September 16, 2013
By 
Rainy (West coast, USA) - See all my reviews
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The second edition has many updated beer recipes that are current and trendy right now to go along with the older classics: New Castle, Redhook ESB, Lots of Sierra Nevada, Dogfish Head IPA, Pete's Wicked Ale, Dos Equis, Lagunita's IPA, Alaska Smoked Porter, Rogue Old Crustean Barley Wine, Stone IPA, West Coast, Sam Adams, Moose Drool, Big Sky Brewing

If you know anything about specialty beers there are a lot of options and good variety. They really did a good job of merging quality with well-known names.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stepping it up, March 4, 2014
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Was into Kit beers until I bought this book now all of my brewing is done from clone recipes out of this book. I currently have brewed 4 different clones and they have all turned out pretty close to the originals. Excellent book with great easy to understand recipes.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Book but one little flaw, February 11, 2011
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Ok short and sweet this book is really really good and here is why:

Great Recipes that are easy to follow from around the world. All the recipes have the specs for extract, mini-mash, and all grain. Great because I enterchange mainly from all grain & mini mashes.

Great formulas. They provide all the formulas you would need to tweek and even create your own "spin-off" recipes. They give you formulas to calculate, hop bitterness, extract abv contribution, and mash grain abv contribution.

The only flaw and this is my personal opinion would be that about 2/5 of all the recipes are lager recipes. I dont typically brew lagers so these recipes are not for me. Lagering takes more equipment and longer fermenting times so I tend to stay away. So, if you are like me and brew 99% ales just be aware of this. Of course you could just pitch some ale yeast with lager recipes and have a great brew. Cheers!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars For journeyman/master brewers, September 5, 2011
By 
Kevin (Charleston, WV) - See all my reviews
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I bought this book about two months ago.The book is full of post it notes, marking future brewing projects. So far, I have brewed one recipe (Elephant Lager)which turned out great and I am planning to make at least three more recipes from the book. I did have to refer to the mashing and sparging tables in The Joy of Home Brewing to make my all grain beer. The book also gives partial mash instructions, and they are complete, but the all grain mashing instructions are sketchy. This is probably not a problem for most of the people who are likely to buy the book. As a hardcore beer nurd, I have a shelf of brewing books.
1/4 of my kitchen is taken up with brewing supplies and there are hundreds of empties in my garage. If this sounds in any way like you, you'll probably love it.
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