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From the Closed World to the Infinite Universe (Hideyo Noguchi Lecture) Paperback – October 1, 1968


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From the Closed World to the Infinite Universe (Hideyo Noguchi Lecture) + Ways of Worldmaking + The Norton Shakespeare: Based on the Oxford Edition (Second Edition)  (Vol. One-Volume Clothbound)
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Product Details

  • Series: Hideyo Noguchi Lecture
  • Paperback: 328 pages
  • Publisher: Johns Hopkins University Press; 1st edition (October 1, 1968)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801803470
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801803475
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #929,939 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

An important contribution to the problem of the transition from the world view characteristic of the medieval centuries to that which rapidly gained acceptance after the seventeenth century.

(Philosophical Quarterly)

Koyré has provided the material and has illuminated it with uniformly perceptive and occasionally brilliant commentary... An important contribution to the study of 17th-century thought.

(Thomas S. Kuhn Science)

A model of scholarliness without pedantry, of clarity without oversimplification.

(Arthur Koestler Encounter)

Surely a work that will be welcomed alike by the scientist, philosopher, and historian of ideas.

(Philosophy and Phenomenological Research)

About the Author

Alexandre Koyré was a member of the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, and professor at the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes in Paris. His books include Discovering Plato and Newtonian Studies.


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Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 37 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 28, 1999
Format: Paperback
Korye's decades-old book is still a pleasure and a marvel to read. The ideas developed in this first-rate work are lucidly and extensively developed and contain such subtle gems of thought that one could not possibly discover all of them with a single reading. Anyone with even but a passing interest in the history and philosophy of science should add this book to his library. A true classic!
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By K. F. Laux on April 16, 2006
Format: Paperback
Of all the tomes I read during my years studying the history of science, this is the one I tend to come back to the most.

Koyre describes the thinking of such diverse figures as Giordano Bruno, Nicholas of Cusa, Galileo, Henry More, and Johannes Kepler regarding the possibility that the universe might be of unlimited extent. As such, the discussions, particularly early on, deal more with scholastic philosophy, with heavy emphasis on religious implications. They deal with abstract notions, and some of the thinking of these early figures is quite bold, startling even, and beautiful, after a fashion.

It is apropos to recall that science was long known as "natural philosophy"...and indeed, as the former figures give way to the analyses of Newton and Leibniz, we find Koyre's work limning the disentangling of these two threads, philosophy and science, at least with respect to cosmology.

In particular, Koyre underlines one of the most ironical developments in all the history of ideas at the very end of the book, in recounting how the triumph of Newtonian physics rendered superfluous the God that it had been Newton's purpose to honor through his science.

Not for everyone; but for me, magnificent.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By theaetetus on January 3, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a fantastic book; unfortunately, this version is almost unreadable. There is no indentation or italicization, and quotation marks are often misplaced. This makes it awfully difficult to tell the lengthy quoted passages apart from the author's own text. Definitely read this book--just buy it from a different publisher.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Nick Hirsch on October 10, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
While the book itself is very good and very important in the history and philosophy of science, this edition is the absolute worst. I am convinced this "publisher" is breaking some sort of copyright law, as there is none of the standard information on the inside cover, and the layout is so bad that I was half convinced that I received the wrong book. I'm still not convinced I got the right one, and will be purchasing a different copy as soon as I can.

The text is almost devoid of formatting, up to and including a lack of indentation, improper spacing on block quotes, improperly sized illustrations, misplaced quotation marks, etc. It's like they had someone just retype the book into a Word document, then republished and resold it on the assumption that grad students like myself will see the cost reduction and take the bait.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Alvaro Lewis on May 10, 2003
Format: Paperback
Readers of this book beware, its themes are huge! It contains lucid narrative of the competition from Cartesians to Newtonians for the best model of the universe and the nature of time and space. There are scarcely any baggy corners into which the reader will turn unwillingly. However, there is not terribly much about the science or the methods of discovery employed by these thinkers in their shared pursuit of important results. Koyre has written a classic study of intellectual history. Discussion of divinity and its aspects is abundant because this presence was one that the scientists were working diligently to situate without offending the authorities and employers of the age. The universe is a source whose study has profoundly metaphysical and ontological implications. Koyre brings these alive for the reader and shares the tumult of ideas that produced much of what we consider now to be a satisfactory vision of the universe.
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