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Closer To Home

August 27, 2002 | Format: MP3

$5.99
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
4:51
30
2
3:29
30
3
5:14
30
4
4:27
30
5
5:10
30
6
4:37
30
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7:13
30
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10:08
30
9
4:33
30
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11:30
30
11
7:17
30
12
5:23
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: August 15, 2002
  • Release Date: August 27, 2002
  • Label: Capitol Records
  • Copyright: (C) 2002 Capitol Records, Inc.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 1:13:52
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000SXJFJQ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (88 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #30,578 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 6, 2002
Format: Audio CD
On this, their third album, Grand Funk Railroad's own unique sound became fully evolved. The band had started with re-written and refined material from their days as another group when they debuted as GFR in 1969 with "On Time." With their second album, "Grand Funk," the band gave birth to a unique entity of music: a hybrid of edgy hard rock, quirky pop, and soulful blues. However, their music, though catchy, was still very infantile. It was clear that the band was still learning to crawl. With "Closer to Home," they officially carved their niche into the musical world with a vengeance. The pulsating rhythms of Mel Schacher's bass, the primal yet deeply spiritual melodies of Mark Farner's guitar, and the much-underrated beat of Don Brewer's drumming came together to paint a picture of how society should be.
The songs, though sometimes mistaken for party fare, are very conceptual. One the A Side, the band examines the world as it was in 1970 (and still is today): a cold place where humanity is in danger of being wiped out by its own desires. On the B Side, Mark Farner's lyrics shift from an observation to a warning: that our best chance for survival as a species depends on adopting an attitude of peace, love, and mutual respect and tolerance for one's neighbors, be they friend or foe. This idea is slowly built upon until it reaches a head with the band's magnum opus: "I'm Your Captain," a ten-minute tour de force of quiet yet explosive rhythms, and some of Farner's best lyrics. The band spends the last half of the song pleading with society to find its way back to the light (accompanied by a flutist and a string section, a first for the group).
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 3, 2003
Format: Audio CD
I was over a friend's house and she put a CD on and I had no clue what band it was. I soon found myself listening to the songs and becoming enthralled at the quality of the sound from not only the CD, but the music itself which was just amazing.
After listening to the entire CD I decided to buy it even though I had never even heard of the band before (that's how good it was). I bought it at B&N and listened to it at least 2 times every day for about 2 months. If someone is interested in classic rock with early heavy metal and blues influences, this is the CD for you. The live bonus tracks are great, especially the sound and energy of the crowd.
However, the three tracks of Mean Mistreater are a little excessive, and after a while I found myself skipping over the re-mix and the live version.
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24 of 28 people found the following review helpful By Mook Hayes on September 14, 2004
Format: Audio CD
I happened to hear the song "Sin's a Good Man's Brother" played by a DJ at a club recently. While the song was playing I had to go ask the DJ what it was, and couldn't believe it was Grand Funk. I didn't know much about them, but the song sounded like it was from a current hard rock/metal band.

Right away I ordered the cd and I couldn't believe the sound - so ahead of its time! Big bass, guitars and drums, and great riffs. Except for the vocals, you would never know that this album was from 1970.

It was also a treat to hear "I'm Your Captain" - never knew who that song was by, and its quite epic and monumental.

Great cd.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Robert Orme on September 10, 2007
Format: Audio CD
I've always thought Closer to Home was Grand Funk's best album, but unfortunately I also felt the sound was quite possibly the worst of any Grand Funk record, with the possible exception of their first one, On Time. Terry Knight would certainly not rate on anyone's list of greatest rock producers in history; he did alright on a few Grand Funk records, but really botched some others, Closer to Home being among them. I don't normally upgrade from an original release to a remastered CD, but I thought this one was certainly worthy of an upgrade so I picked it up last night at a local independent retailer. I was very pleasantly surprised with the results. Everything is much more clear as opposed to muddy on the original, especially Mark Farner's guitar and voice. Songs which benefit the most from this new remastered version: I Don't Have to Sing the Blues and I'm Your Captain (Closer to Home).

There are four bonus tracks, starting with an alternate studio mix of Mean Mistreater. When I first heard it, I thought, "why did they leave out that organ part on the original? This sounds better." Reading the liner notes, it's obvious I'm not the only one who feels that way: "On this long-awaited, fully-remastered CD reissue, we are treated to a Mean Mistreater bonus track that features Mark's organ part as well as the electric piano. Why they chose to strip the organ part off the song when the album's track order was set in stone is something of a mystery. Many will no doubt now agree that the track sounds even better with the organ part intact."

Three LIVE bonus tracks follow: In Need, Heartbreaker and Mean Mistreater. In case you Funk fans are wondering, all three were recorded 6/25/70 at Orlando Sports Center, Florida.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By dpbelle@aol.com on April 23, 1999
Format: Audio CD
I discovered this album when I was 16 years old, and it really hit me on the nerve. Already a fan of Black Sabbath, Led Zeppelin, and Deep Purple, I really took to Grand Funk as well--after all, they did the heavy early 70s rock thing too, and they were an American band to boot! If you are a fan of great grooves (Hooked on Love and Nothing Is The Same will have you playing "air drums") and 70s wah-drenched guitar playing, check out Closer To Home.
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