Coat Of Many Colors

April 3, 2007 | Format: MP3

$9.99
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3:04
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2:17
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2:28
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2:27
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2:28
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: February 12, 2007
  • Release Date: February 12, 2007
  • Label: RLG/Legacy
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 37:36
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B00138F2HO
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #136,893 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

Received cd quickly and in great shape.
William T. Rogers
Parton's personal touch and soaring vocals, the themes the album explores, and the poingant story from her youth make this album a timeless country music classic.
ewomack
The title song, despite only charting in the back of the top ten, is perhaps her most famous and certainly greatest song she has ever written.
Tee

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By hyperbolium on April 4, 2007
Format: Audio CD
For an artist of Parton's stature, it's incredible that her towering early achievements are so spottily available on CD. Many of her brilliant solo albums of the '70s - the sides waxed before crossing over to pop stardom - have been left unreissued. The few that have seen CD, such as this classic 1971 release, have moved in and out of print. Buddha provided a straight-up reissue in 1999, and an imported two-fer on BMG paired this title with Parton's "Joshua" LP. The domestic Buddha release is now replaced by this bonus-track augmented Legacy reissue, but fans that want the extra tracks here and "Joshua" on the import will buy themselves some duplication.

Parton's early years under the tutelage of Porter Wagoner were rich in material and performances, and "Coat of Many Colors" contains some of her best. The title track weaves biography, bible verse and gospel soul into one of Parton's most heart-rending compositions. Her words capture the emotional turmoil of childhood through the discovery of an adult's nostalgic memory, and her voice holds both a little girl's confusion and a women's knowingness. It's breathtaking to hear songwriting, singing and production mesh so fully.

The unrivaled quality of Parton's voice is heard on the bluegrass-harmony backed "My Blue Tears" and the forthright "She Never Met a Man (She Didn't Like)." Parton's sassy comedic edge, which would carry her into the mainstream, is heard on "Traveling Man," and the outré "If I Lose My Mind" must have shocked a few country listeners in 1971. The backings include fiddle, steel, twangy guitar, funky swamp beats and even a touch of '70s soul, and it's a testament to Parton's artistic gravity that it meshes so well into an album.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Allen Chapman VINE VOICE on April 4, 2007
Format: Audio CD
This is one of three titles re-issued of Dolly Parton. This one, along with "Jolene" have been issued on CD several times already. So the draw here are the bonus tracks. In this case the album as a whole is better than the bonus tracks. The bonus tracks are good, but nothing that stands out and knocks you over. The acoustic "My Blue Tears" is the best of the bunch though. As for the original album, some classic tracks here. One Dolly's stronger early albums.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By hyperbolium on December 8, 2001
Format: Audio CD
Parton's years under the tutelage (and to a large extent, control) of Porter Wagoner were rich in good material and performances, even if they didn't produce the sort of enormous popular acclaim she would later find. 1971's "Coat of Many Colors" is a perfect example of the brilliant work Parton was recording during these years, including the gospel inflections of the signature title tune, the bluegrass harmonies of "My Blue Tears," and the more outre subject matter of "If I Lose My Mind" and "She Never Met a Man (She Didn't Like)."
The title track attests to Parton's brilliance as a songwriter, capturing the emotional turmoil of childhood through the discovery of an adult's nostalgic memory. Parton's voice holds both a little girl's confusion and a woman's knowingness, underlined by acoustic guitar, a light shuffle beat, and touches of gospel organ and background harmonies. It's breathtaking to hear songwriting, singing and production mesh so fully. Throughout the rest of the album Parton's songs, augmented by a trio of tunes from Wagoner, tell human stories in a language that seems effortlessly plainspoken. The productions remain light and supportive, spanning weepy steel and fiddle ("The Mystery of the Mystery"), twangy electric guitar and a funky swamp beat ("Traveling Man"), and 70s soul ("Here I am").
Buddha's reissue presents a crisp remastering of the album's original ten tracks. Parton's original handwritten liner notes are reproduced in reduced form, necessitating a magnifying glass for most readers. Robyn Flans newly penned notes provide a few short paragraphs of career background, but haven't the room to make much of a dent in explaining the album and its songs.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 27, 1999
Format: Audio CD
I must fully agree with those who are praising the reissue of this album. It seems that many of Parton's earlier more country oriented work will gradually be reissued. Now that she seems to be rediscovering her roots with albums like "Hungry Again," and "The Grass is Blue," it is time for the rest of the world who seems to think that Shania Twain is the real deal, the understand what a real country album sounds like. This is the place to start!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By B. Fullmer on April 3, 2007
Format: Audio CD
I love Dolly, and I am very pleased to see a trend at rereleasing her older albums on CD. I HAD to buy this version of Coat for the bonus tracks, which are wonderful. I have never really been a fan of demo tracks, nor a fan of "My Blue Tears", but this version is remarkable and has proved to me what a great song it is! I am hoping to see more reissues in the futurn; "Bubblin' Over" anyone?
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 8, 1999
Format: Audio CD
For too long, RCA/BMG has treated the catalog of Dolly Parton with incompetence and indifference. Albums from her early country period have been out of print for years while collection after collection contain the same songs from her uninteresting pop phase of her career. With the long overdue reissue of this album, BMG may be sending signals that it is ready to treat this music with the respect and honor it deserves.
If there was no other song here then the title track, this CD would be worth having, but as it turns out the entire disc is full of the kind of music Dolly Parton has always done best. Now that commercial radio has turned their backs on her, Parton seems to be headed back in the place she should have never left. Let us hope that BMG's reissue of this classic album is a sign of good things to come from them. Here's to more Parton reissues.
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