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Coffin Man (Charlie Moon Mysteries) Hardcover – November 8, 2011


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Product Details

  • Series: Charlie Moon Mysteries (Book 16)
  • Hardcover: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Minotaur Books (November 8, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312613709
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312613709
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 1.2 x 9.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (63 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #994,559 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“A droll fandango… Storytelling that caresses the synapses... Top-flight work from Doss, who can outplot most anybody and give cold-blooded miscreants a case of the giggles. Are you listening, awards committees?”
Kirkus Reviews (starred review) on A Dead Man’s Tale

Snake Dreams is the thirteenth novel in this series, and since it’s a very good one—funny, smart, and totally different—it’s a great place for readers to discover Moon.”
The Globe and Mail (Toronto) on Snake Dreams

“James D. Doss’s novels about Charlie Moon… feel as if the author is sitting around a campfire, spinning a tall tale that engulfs a circle of listeners.… Doss’s tale is evocative of the area and of Indian lore, and his chatty, down-home style shines.”
Florida Sun-Sentinel on Three Sisters

“Doss’s trademark humor keeps Charlie and Scott wisecracking as the plot spins smartly along to an unpredictable ending.… The most recent Charlie Moon mysteries still charm us with Western voices and ways.”
Rocky Mountain News on Three Sisters

“Doss does for the Utes what Tony Hillerman has done for the Navajo.”
The Denver Post

From the Back Cover

When a young lady vanishes, Colorado rancher and Ute tribal investigator Charlie Moon is the man to call--whether it's mystery, mysticism, or murder…



"Doss does for the Utes what Tony Hillerman has done for the Navajo."--The Denver Post


After a heavy storm, Charlie receives a panicked call from Wanda Naranjo. Not only is her sink leaking, but her daughter Betty is sixteen and pregnant--and missing. Where'd she go? No one knows. Who's the father? Anybody's guess. Any leads? Just the local bad-boy carpenter who's raising suspicion faster than he can build a pine box…


"Laced with Native American lore [and] comedic asides."


--Library Journal (starred review)


As if that wasn't enough of a bad omen, Charlie's Aunt Daisy seems to have lost her connection to the spirit world, a mysterious stranger has shown up at Charlie's ranch, and someone's found a dead body in the cemetery. A fresh dead body. Now Charlie's got to hunker down and dig up some evidence--before a killer puts the final nail in his coffin…


"The Charlie Moon mysteries charm us with Western voices and ways."

--Rocky Mountain News


--This text refers to the Mass Market Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

His plots are unique as well as the characters in the story.
Elissa
This is James D. Doss's sixteenth book in the Charlie Moon series, and the seventeenth one was written just before his death in 2012.
H. R. Holt
Too much time spent in meaningless dialogue, and Aunt Daisy needs to cast a spell to make changes.
Rick Gaskins

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Suki on December 4, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I love Charlie Moon and Aunt Daisy. However the last couple of books the writing has changed. I don't mind the inner thoughts of the characters, it's the constant narrator commentary that is very annoying. What happened? This new style of writing makes the reading tedious. Please Mr. Doss go back to your original writing style. I look forward to the next Charlie Moon story but I won't be buying the book, I will get it from the library.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By M. E. Fuehrer on May 25, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I have not read any of his books, but wanted his readers to know that Mr. Doss passed away on May 17, 2012 at the age of 73. According to the obiturary, he completed his last book shortly before his death.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Barbara Bickmore on January 1, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have loved the Charlie Moon books by James Doss, but this is not even good writing. Does he suddenly have a ghost writer? I not only loved his characters but his writing style but this is not even well written. It certainly is not the style that made James Doss famous. I was severely let down. This would not have gotten published were Mr. Doss an unknown and not had a string of successes behind him. Daisy is not even interesting and I'd have thought that impossible. Charlie is not irresistible and Parras is very mediocre. Not interesting as well as poorly written. What a disappointment.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By lower lakota on September 14, 2012
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
I've always looked foreward to the latest James Doss book, but "Coffin Man" was just plain far below par. Coffin Man (Charlie Moon Mysteries) Many parts seemed very forced and awkard. Aunt Dasiy, who was always a constant delight, took on a mean edge and many sections didn't seem to contribute to the story or reading enjoyment. But in retrospect, these failings first began to appear in his previous book, "A Dead Man's Tale". Hope his next (and last) book gets back on track.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mick McAllister on April 8, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Every time Jimmy Doss adds a new book to his revenue stream, I end up having to reset my estimate of just how bad a book can be. And he's done it again. Coffin Man is even a worst piece of trash than any of the previous books. It's got all the usual special qualities: sophomoric humor, cardboard dialog that makes comic books sound like Shakespeare, sociopathic characters, a pointless plot that meanders self-indulgently nowhere, overwriting that would abash Foghorn Leghorn.

Overwriting? Well, for example, Doss thinks a noun without an adjective is naked, and he doesn't like to peek at nakedness; no, no, no. So Charlie Moon is never (avert your eyes) "the Indian" or "the Ute," he's "the lithe, lanky Indian" or "the lean, lissome Ute." No wait, it's Sarah Frank who is the "lissome Ute-Papago orphan." My mistake. Charlie never drives a "truck"; he drives a "spiffy truck" or a "bright red truck" or a "sparkly truck." Oh dang, that's Sarah again, with the truck. Charlie drives a "big Ford Motor Company product"; and if you think I made that up, just pick a page at random. Overwriting as in taking six lines to paraphrase the title of Willie Nelson's "Mommas, Don't let Your Sons Grow up to Be Cowboys." Or how about two lines (p. 270) to paraphrase "horseshoe": "discarded U-shaped appliances that had formerly been used to shoe four-legged creatures of the equine persuasion" and never mind that you don't use horseshoes to shoe horses, you use nails and hammers. Overwriting as in having someone think "I'll bet he'll say no," followed by the character saying "no" AND, in case we are still conscious, the other person thinking "I knew he was going to say 'no.'" That may be doing double duty as sophomoric humor; what's supposed to be funny is often a wild guess.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Belle of KY on September 25, 2012
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Coffin Man is a disappointment. I have been reading all of the James Doss mysteries for years, and have enjoyed each one until this title. Mr. Doss tries to put humor in but it is silly and staged; I hope Old Gray Wolf is better.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By V. C. Wolf on January 26, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book has so many non- relevant sentences it was boring as can be. I deleted it from my Kindle about 40% of the way through. Doss has lost his story telling abilities. Don't waste your money on this book.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Ex-Ute Reservation law enforcement officer Charlie Moon, now newbie cattle rancher and part time tribal investigator leads a surprisingly complicated life. He and Granite Creek police chief Parris work together in totally different styles to discover the answers to the latest mystery or murders in their jurisdiction.

I loved this "episode" of the Charlie Moon mysteries. Doss brings all of his characters to life in an easy-to-relate-to way, keeping them real. I'm sure that's part of what contributes to the sheer enjoyment and total suspension of disbelief these stories create. Tribal elder "Aunt Daisy" is a feisty character and not relegated to the usual stereotypes the elderly are generally pegged with, and the unique friendship between Moon and Parris is like a pair of old, comfortable slippers after a rough day of standing. Highly recommend the whole series and this installment among them.
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More About the Author

JAMES D. DOSS is the author of twelve Charlie Moon mysteries, two of which were named one of the best books of the year by Publishers Weekly. Originally from Kentucky, he divides his time between Los Alamos and Taos, New Mexico.

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