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Cogan's Trade Paperback – Bargain Price, December 23, 2002

3.9 out of 5 stars 50 customer reviews

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Paperback, Bargain Price, December 23, 2002
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This is a bargain book and quantities are limited. Bargain books are new but could include a small mark from the publisher and an Amazon.com price sticker identifying them as such. Details
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Editorial Reviews

Review

 “Higgins deserves to stand in the company of the likes of Chandler and Hammett as one of the true innovators in crime fiction.” —Scott Turow
 
"Higgins can plot a whole book like one long chase scene. He can write dialogue so authentic it spits." —Life
 
"The Balzac of the Boston underworld. ... Higgins is almost uniquely blessed with a gift for voices, each of them ... as distinctive as a fingerprint."—The New Yorker
 
“One of the great crime writers of the twentieth century.” —Kansas City Star

“Higgins writes about the world of crime with an authenticity that is unmatched.” --The Washington Post
 
“A uniquely gifted writer . . . who does at least as well by the Hogarthian Boston he knows as Raymond Chandler once did for Southern California.” —The New York Times
 
"Superb. . . Higgins is a complete novelist. His work will be read when the work of competing writers has been forgotten."—Chicago Daily News
 
"Brilliant. . . Higgins is a master stylist."--New York Post
 
“George V. Higgins’s mastery of the patois of the Boston criminal class is legendary.” —San Jose Mercury News --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

About the Author

George V. Higgins was assistant DA in Boston before becoming a defense attorney and then a full-time writer. Described as 'the Balzac of Boston' and 'the poet of Boston sleaze' he wrote over thirty books, including a handful of lowlife masterpieces constructed almost entirely of pitch-perfect dialogue. He died in 1999. Cogan's Trade is the book behind the major motion picture Killing Them Softly starring Brad Pitt.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 224 pages
  • ISBN-10: 0786711086
  • ASIN: B000HWYOMQ
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.4 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,420,747 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Cogan's Trade was one of George Higgins' earlier crime novels written in the 1970s. It is uniquely written in that the text is almost all dialogue. It is a story of Boston area Irish-American lowlife mobsters and their escapades. It concerns the gunpoint robbery of a mob-protected high stakes card game and the mayhem that ensues. The characters are all quite colorful and their language captures the time and the mileu. It is a novel I've reread several times and throughly enjoyed each reading . Definitely recommended for aficionados of the hard-boiled school of crime novels.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
When you run a business and problems pop up, you have to retain specialists to deal with them. Say you operate a restaurant and your dishwasher breaks down; you have to bring in a plumber to fix it. Your business uses computers to keep track of inventory and your server goes down? Chances are you are going to have to hire an IT expert.

So it is with organized crime: when an enterprise goes off the tracks, somebody has to fix it - particularly when the way it goes awry scares away the customers the business depends on. Thus, when a trio of numbskulls robs a Mafia-protected illegal gambling operation in Boston in 1974. The mob turns to Jackie Cogan to manage the repair job.

Fixing the damage is crucial: since the robbery, all the mob-connected card games have shut down and the Mafia is losing a fortune in tribute the games' operators pay to remain in business. The success of one robbery has raised the prospect of copycats, so the perpetrators must be found and dealt with quickly.

Cogan is a specialist in fixing this type of problem by a judicious application of violence. It is, in fact, his profession: Cogan's Trade, as it is styled in the original title of the 1974 novel by George V. Higgins (that has been turned into the motion picture, "Killing Them Softly," just released this month).

Any thoughtful person who has read one of Higgins' books knows that action is not his métier. Higgins, who died in 1999, cut his teeth on organized crime, first as an assistant district attorney, then an Assistant U.S. Attorney assigned to the federal Organized Crime Strike Force, and finally as a newspaper reporter and columnist.
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Format: Paperback
The late George V. Higgins earned a reputation as a master of low-life dialogue. Entire chapters of his books were often conversations, sometimes essentially monologues. This was a risky way to write. Some readers found the endless talk tedious, and many (this reviewer included) found his output uneven.

Cogan's Trade was perhaps his best, a slender and deceptively simple tale of intramural activity of the Boston area mob. A web of connections determines who does what to whom as the title character emerges to become a grand inquisitor who forgot about the commandment that states "Thou shalt not kill." Jackie Cogan, compact and intense, is a cold-blooded paradigm of mob virtue, while other characters prove they're not as smart as they think they are.

The result is a suspenseful tale full of comic relief. Most readers are content to go along for the ride, but the repeat reader begins to see layers and symbolism in the this little masterpiece from "the Balzac of the Boston underworld."
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Format: Paperback
Mario Puzo gives us eloquent and artistic proses when unfolding a story of the Mafia, and underworld. George V. Higgins gives you the grit, the hard-boiled inner-workings of low on the totem pole true thugs. On reading the book, you feel like your sitting around the table listening to their conversation face to face. The author's gift of planting the reader on street level of day to day goings on of south Boston mobsters is astounding. George V. Higgins today, is quite underrated and thinly read. It's an abysmal shame.
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By VH on September 25, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
I had read The Friends of Eddie Coyle years ago and recognized it as deserving its classic status. Having seen a preview of the new movie - called Killing Them Softly - which is based on this book, Cogan's Trade, I sought out the book and enjoyed reading it. Loved the characters, the dialogue (Higgins' dialogue stands out, of course), the awfulness!
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
George Higgins wrote like no other author. A fast paced read told almost totally in dialogue. you have to read this if you like the '70's mob movies, it captures the underbelly of that scene rather than the Don Corleones. Great book.
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Format: Paperback
In his later books, the dialogue completlely overpowered the plot. In this one, his third I think, Higgins still had a story to tell. The "he made two mistakes" analysis to justify a hit comes close to Catch-22 for devastating logic. It's at least 40 years old and I still re-read this one (and Eddie Coyle, and Digger's Game) every so often.
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By X on April 25, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The conversations go on endlessly and veer the reader away from the plot. Granted, the dialogue is rich and hilarious at times but I would have liked a hint of description occasionally about surroundings, characters, smell, the senses. The length of the book was good because anymore of these yack-fests beyond the last page and I would have quit.
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