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Coil Enhanced

54 customer reviews

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Coil
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Audio CD, Enhanced, May 20, 1997
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Editorial Reviews

Toad The Wet Sprocket ~ Coil

1. Whatever I Fear
2. Come Down
3. Rings
4. Dam Would Break
5. Desire
6. Don't Fade
7. Little Man Big Man
8. Throw It All Away
9. Amnesia
10. Little Buddha
11. Crazy Life
12. All Things In Time

Product Details

  • Audio CD (May 20, 1997)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Format: Enhanced
  • Label: Sony
  • ASIN: B000002BR9
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (54 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #93,540 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 18, 1998
Format: Audio CD
This CD is unusual for Toad largely because of the dearth of ballads, a staple of past Toad efforts. Only "Don't Fade" and "All Things in Time" would adequately fit that description on this album.
The main characteristic that strikes the listener is the depth of lyricism. Glen Phillips really reveals the depths of his talent in these songs about such wide-ranging topics as mysticism ("Little Buddha"), the plight of American Indians ("Crazy Life"), and materialism ("Throw It All Away"). There is also one really gritty rocker on this album, "Desire," which is the most physical song Toad ever wrote. "Rings" is an extremely intriguing song, because it's written from the point of view of a tree, a device that is also employed for the first time (and unfortunately the last) here. All in all, this is probably Toad's most ambitious album. "Whatever I Fear" tackles self-doubt and self-loathing with an almost unforgiving cynicism, "Dam Would Break" addresses repressed memories and dirty secrets, and "Crazy Life" employs both 19th century ("Over Pine Ridge to Wounded Knee") and 20th century ("What have you done with Peltier?") allusions to attack, albeit subtly, the Americans' treatment of Indians. Another socially conscientious track is "Amnesia," about as close to rage as Toad ever got. The song attacks prejudice, ignorance, and genocide, specifically the Holocaust, and by extension, current examples of "amnesia in comfort" like the oppression of immmigrants and human rights violations in foreign countries.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Khyron on February 27, 2012
Format: Audio CD
There's just something about a band's final recording, isn't there? That last gasp of creativity and cohesion (if there was any) amongst a group of musicians offers a unique insight into a band's final days. For most, the swan song is anything but; bands lost in turmoil and in-fighting and the pressures of meeting contract obligations often yield less than stellar codas. Others, however, gift us with some of their most inspired and enduring work before buying the farm.

I'd like to think that Toad The Wet Sprocket falls squarely into the later category. 1997's Coil is by no means a departure for this band musically. Of course, knowing what you're getting has always been the appeal of Toad. Never going through a disco or ambient phase netted a loyal, if never shocked, fan base. What began with Bread and Circus and then Pale was expanded upon in both Fear and Dulcinea, culminating in Coil; a record that pays homage to the simpler, dirge-esque days of Pale (Don't Fade) while simultaneously pointing towards a harder, more electric sound (Whatever I fear, Come Down, Desire).

Thankfully, Coil was never designed to win over new fans or push the envelope of alternative rock. Toad knew exactly what their fans were expecting and delivered with each successive record. Songs built around complimentary, not competing acoustic and electric guitars, much the way Modern English composed music, yielded songs that are at once home-spun and organic, while at the same time feeling anthemic and powerful. "Whatever I fear" fades in on an electric guitar only to yield to the acoustic, where as "Dam Would Break" takes the opposite approach. Each works beautifully and the result are songs that could seemingly take different directions but always end up reaching the same destination.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 25, 1999
Format: Audio CD
I haven't heard enough of Toad's previous works to know how Coil compares to earlier disks, but I've heard that this isn't their best. If that's true, I really need to hear their other ones because I think Coil is fabulous. It has meaningful lyrics and outstanding vocals. The music isn't so loud that it drowns out the words and its more than just a bunch of guitar riffs thrown into a sequence. That's not to say that the guitar is bad, because its very good and compliments the vocals well. The whole disk is excellent but the songs that particularly stand out to me are "Whatever I Fear," "Come Down," "All Things in Time," "Throw it all Away," and my new favorite song "Little Man Big Man." Toad knows how to write a song that means something. There's none of the sex, drugs, and offensive language that dominate rock music today. I can't wait to hear some of Toad's earlier albums and it's a shame they broke up.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By KCZorroDeFuego on December 16, 1999
Format: Audio CD
Having long since been a toad fan (since "All I Want" first hit the radio), I enjoyed their music but did not purchase any till recently, picking up In Light Syrup and this, their very last (excepting P.S., of course). Moving, sweet, and sensitive, and even when Toad breaks from formula, it is interesting rather than a jarring misstep. And the heartbreakingly sweet "Silo Lullaby" [found as a .mov file on the CD or normally on P.S.] is the perfect goodbye for a band that deserves every bit of praise it gets. From "Whatever I Fear" to "Dam Would Break" to "Little Man Big Man" (the best 3) and many others, this is an album that yes, some minor flaws, but still, one to treasure.
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