True Blood 7 Seasons 2008

Amazon Instant Video

Season 1
Available on Prime
(3,345) IMDb 8.2/10
Available in HDAvailable on Prime

6. Cold Ground TV-MA CC

Numbed by tragedy, Sookie looks for refuge from the cacophony of her friends and neighbors' inner voices. After lashing out at his sister and decking Andy, Jason wrestles with withdrawal symptoms from his V-juice habit.

Starring:
Anna Paquin, Stephen Moyer
Runtime:
53 minutes
Original air date:
October 12, 2008

Available in HD on supported devices.

Cold Ground

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Season 1
Available on Prime

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
2,176
4 star
554
3 star
231
2 star
145
1 star
239
See all 3,345 customer reviews
I watched just the first episode and I am hooked!
Gina M Keating
The characters are interesting and the plot twists and weaves a very interesting story that draws you in and gets you addicted.
Sara Yerger
Great acting, good stories and compelling characters!
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

365 of 409 people found the following review helpful By Poppyx TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 18, 2008
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Rabbit ears on pawn shop televisions are about my speed; needless to say, I don't watch television. However, kind friends mainline this series two or three shows at a time, and they got me hooked: were I to be completely honest, I might have to admit to giving serious thought to obtaining this by less-than-legal-means. It actually might be worth jail time.

Speaking as someone who was born in America's deep South, this series captures everything about Louisiana that is appealing. (Spanish Moss, vampires, latent racism and homophobia, the dichotomy between Christian Southern values and patriarchal, brutality-enforced poverty, sassy Southern women who know how to fight with chains, etc.)

What it makes it really stand out, though, is the casting: there isn't a bad actor in the bunch--and they are all believable as Southern archetypes. Nelsan Ellis as the short order cook/drug dealer Lafayette and Stephen Moyer and Anna Paquin as the romantic leads give mesmerizing performances.

True Blood, or possibly the original series of books from which it arose, is an arresting set of stories: Faulkner says that the only thing really worth writing about (or thinking about, by extension) is the human heart in conflict with itself. The Southern United States depicted in True Blood is conflict embodied--you are a supposed to be a good Christian, and follow the rules of an established society, but you live in the middle of a swamp so dense and wild that it believably could be home to minions of Satan, like vampires.

It's a lot to think about. If you are one of those artistic/professional types with too much to do, don't start watching this; it becomes an obsession.
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171 of 198 people found the following review helpful By Robert Moore HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 27, 2008
Format: DVD
I'm not sure that any good series on the supernatural has ever tried as hard to be simply good fun. It isn't the masterpiece that BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER was, but I don't think Alan Ball set his sights that high. While Joss Whedon strove in BUFFY to create an icon and redefine television narrative, Ball just seems to want to tell a compelling story filled with memorable moments.

TRUE BLOOD is, of course, based on the series of novels written by Arkansas writer Charlaine Harris. The series was originally known as the Southern Vampire Mysteries, but has since come to be better known as The Sookie Stackhouse novels. The premise is that a Japanese corporation has successfully created artificial blood, a product so like the real thing that vampires, previously relegated to feeding off humans in the dark, come "out of the coffin" and into society, intent on living off the new fake blood. The series' title comes from the name of the artificial blood marketed and sold in stores. The television series wisely does not try to hew too closely to the novels, though for the most part Sookie's story does. And the way things turn at the end of the season, it is clear that Season Two (the show was renewed very early in the season) is going to pick up with the second novel in the series, though the action most likely will be in Bon Temps and not in Dallas (the second novel is entitled LIVING DEAD IN DALLAS).

The major difference between the novels and the TV series is that while the novels focus almost entirely on Sookie, the series has elevated a number of secondary characters and padded out their story. The focus on Sookie in the books is inevitable given that she is the narrator.
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132 of 161 people found the following review helpful By Sara Lucy on November 17, 2008
Format: DVD
It was fascinating---at first---to watch the Sookie Stackhouse books brought to life. Her developing relationship with the vampire Bill was wonderfully compelling, and Eric's strength of character is flawless.

Unfortunately, an excessive amount of time is spent on unappealing secondary characters, and the main characters consistently get lost in a lot of tedious filler.

As well, the show's writers need to collaborate. The inconsistencies that keep showing up have turned Sookie into a wishy-washy, unlikeable person who changes the facts to suit her mood.

*SPOILERS* She's in love and makes love with Bill, then flirts and makes out with Sam in the next episode. Wasn't she supposed to be uncomfortable kissing one man and then moving on to another? As well, to work that scene into the show, Sookie states that Bill is more concerned with politics than with her---yet she knows his absence has nothing to do with politics. Geez! He's on trial for staking another vampire to save her life, and she's supposedly aware of that fact.

The writers need to read the blogs. The show's audience has been objecting---even those who haven't read the books.

Charlaine Harris created a world sufficiently rich, well-paced, and filled with drama. There's no need for lame side stories and inconsistencies that demean the main characters. When you try to fix something that isn't broken, inevitably, it deteriorates until it does, in fact, get broken.
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48 of 60 people found the following review helpful By C. Hill HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on May 20, 2010
Verified Purchase
True Blood is the HBO adaptation of the popular Sookie Stackhouse vampire novels. While I have not read the books, my wife has and she says that at least the first episode (Strange Love) is somewhat more graphic sexually and is more violent than she thought it would be. On that note, this show has a lot of nudity (both male and female, but mostly topless women), graphic sex scenes (human and vampire), bondage, occult references, graphic violence (somewhat bloody), homosexual characters, insensitivity to overweight people, and even a murder... so if any of those things are not to your liking you might want to pass on this series.

If you are still reading this, you will want to know that this is also a very clever and well produced series that does seem to work combining the harsher elements with a good bit of humor and surprisingly well developed characters.

Set in Louisiana after vampires have "come out" because they can now get a synthetic blood to curb their thirst of humans, this starts off with most people's impression of what a "hick" town is like in the more remote parishes. The main character, Sookie, is a fairly straight laced "good girl" who works as waitress in the local bar. She also happens to be able to read minds (not a spoiler, this is stated in the show "synopsis" and is obvious very quickly). Things get interesting quickly when the bar gets it's first vampire customer ("Bill") and around the same time, Sookie's handsome brother finds himself in some legal trouble.

The casting was fairly good and the actors are mostly believable, which is a relative term in reference to a vampire themed HBO series. The special effects have been kept to a minimum, so far, so the plot is mostly story driven.
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