Start reading Cold War: The Amazing Canada-Soviet Hockey Series of 1972 on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Enter a promotion code
or gift card
 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.
Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 

Cold War: The Amazing Canada-Soviet Hockey Series of 1972 [Kindle Edition]

Roy MacSkimming
4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)

Digital List Price: $11.99 What's this?
Print List Price: $22.95
Kindle Price: $8.69
You Save: $14.26 (62%)

Formats

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle Edition $8.69  
Hardcover --  
Paperback $20.65  
Kindle Delivers
Kindle Delivers
Subscribe to the Kindle Delivers monthly e-mail to find out about each month's Kindle book deals, new releases, editors' picks and more. Learn more (U.S. customers only)

Book Description

In 1972, after enduring years of embarrassing defeat at the hands of Soviet "amateurs," Canadian officials convinced their Moscow counterparts to allow a pre-season, eight-game series between the best hockey players from both nations. For Team Canada, this meant a chance to assemble a "dream team" of NHL professionals and show the world that they still owned ice hockey.

Cold War takes you to the back rooms of the diplomats and apparatchiks who sanctioned this unlikely confrontation -- and then puts you on the ice for the rest. The first four games were played in four different Canadian cities; the final four in Moscow. Despite the absences of Bobby Orr and Bobby Hull, Team Canada's lineup was memorable: the Brothers Esposito, Phil and Tony; Paul Henderson; Serge Savard; Ken Dryden; and Frank Mahovlich. Canadians across the continent were confident of a blowout. "Eight-game sweep!" the leading sports columnists predicted.

But the Red Machine came prepared. The Soviets' fast-paced game of precision passing and surgical attack caught the Canadians off guard. By the time the series headed to Moscow, the Soviets had jolted Canada and insured that the remaining games would be remembered as perhaps the most fiercely fought hockey of all time.

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought


Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

In 1972, after enduring years of embarrassing defeat at the hands of Soviet "amateurs," Canadian officials convinced their Moscow counterparts to allow a pre-season, eight-game series between the best hockey players from both nations. For Team Canada, this meant a chance to assemble a "dream team" of NHL professionals and show the world that they still owned ice hockey.

Cold War: The Amazing Canada-Soviet Hockey Series of 1972 takes you to the back rooms of the diplomats and apparatchiks who sanctioned this unlikely confrontation--and then puts you on the ice for the rest. The first four games were played on Canadian soil, in four different cities; the final four all took place at the Lenin Sports Complex in Moscow. Despite the absences of Bobby Orr and Bobby Hull, Team Canada's lineup was a memorable one: The Brothers Esposito, Phil and Tony; Paul Henderson; Serge Savard; Ken Dryden; and Frank Mahovlich. Canadians across the continent were confident of a complete blowout. "Eight-game sweep!" the leading sports columnists predicted.

But the Red Machine came prepared. The Soviets' fast-paced game of precision passing and surgical attack caught the cocky (and somewhat out-of-shape) Canadians off guard. By the time the series headed to Moscow, the Soviets had jolted Canada and insured that the remaining games would be remembered as perhaps the most fiercely fought hockey of all time.


Product Details

  • File Size: 2524 KB
  • Print Length: 274 pages
  • Publisher: Greystone Books (July 6, 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008K3W2SM
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #379,293 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
(7)
4.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers
Most Helpful Customer Reviews
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cold War - A piece of "Canadiana" June 21, 2000
Format:Hardcover
"Cold War" is a beautifully written (and researched!) book about the greatest series ever played (in any sport!) Every Canadian remembers where they were when Paul Henderson Scored the game and series winning goal in Moscow, and reading this book literally sent shivers down my spine, and brought back memories long forgotten. It also opened doors to many "behind the scenes" facts that I did not know. But most of all, it reminded me of how arrogant and over-confident we all were, and as Ken Dryden put it: "NEVER, EVER, UNDERESTIMATE YOUR OPPONENT". Of course we had ....
This point was driven home to an entire nation in September of 1972 when Canada's "professional" hockey stars (our "best of the best") played this dramatic eight game series against the "amateurs" of the Soviet Union. This series was the first ever between the Soviets and NHL players, and almost all Canadians, myself included, thought Canada would win all eight games easily. That is not what happened though, the Soviets stunned everyone by going 2-1-1 on Canadian ice. Canada came back in Moscow, winning 3 of 4 dramatically, all one goal games. Against a backdrop of the "cold war", and Canada's pride and identity at stake, even non-hockey fans got caught up the unfolding drama. Canada's pride was hurt for sure, but it forced our players to dig deep within themselves to pull out the skills that produced an amazing victory, despite tremendous obstacles. (such as a hostile press, star players quitting, and officiating that was horribly biased against Canada) The Soviets on the other hand had violated this very same rule when the teams got to Moscow, and clearly had lost their psychological edge. In short, they thought they had the series won.
Read more ›
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent reading for students of intl. hockey February 21, 2000
By A Customer
Format:Hardcover
For those who were very young (like myself) when the series was played and grew up not with the players mentioned but instead with such Russian players as Fedorov and Bure in the NHL, this book is a must to understand how these 8 games played in 1972 forever changed the face of international hockey -- The Canadians (and people in the States as well) realized that we didn't have a monopoly on how to play the game, and the Russians, for all their tremendous preparation and effort, saw that Westerners could rise to the occasion, and ultimately "opened their doors" just enough to begin the journey that today finds several NHL stars hailing from former Warsaw Pact nations. MacSkimming does an excellent job of both drawing upon the original 1972 news accounts and quotes as well as undertaking a host of interviews and research 20+ years later to give a renewed perspective on the games, the players and what it all meant then and now. Even if you know how "it ends," (if you don't you will find out early in the book) the rising action is expertly developed, and you feel (in your mind, at least) nearly the same sense of pride and accomplshment at the end as the Canadian players must have felt. Highly recommened for anyone w/ an interest in hockey and/or the "old" Soviet Union.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sorry Canada...you cheated! December 4, 2009
Format:Paperback
Yes, officially Canada won the seminal 1972 Summit Series. In actuality, this cherished central Canadian fable is based on cheating. Precisely, it was the willful intent to injure the USSR's greatest forward, Valeri Kharlamov (enshrined, by the way, in the Hockey Hall of Fame). Kharlamov was the best player in the series for the USSR. Here is the story, and it indisputably documented in this book. Canada was facing defeat after the Russians won the 5th game in Moscow (the 8-game series stood at 3-1-1...another loss and the Canadians would be mathematically eliminated from any chance at victory in the series). And little, proud Canada simply could not accept defeat in 'their game'. So what did they do? Assistant Coach and ex-Montreal Canadiens 'goon' John Ferguson asked the great Bobby Clarke to intentionally injure Kharlamov by swinging his stick down hard on No. 17's leg, resulting in breaking his ankle. To his credit, Kharlamov attempted to play on, but was obviously the 'worse for wear', and was not a factor thereafter. This is detailed in the book. The Canadians CHEATED, and ignominously and intentionally injured the opposing team's scoring leader, just because 'little Canada' couldn't bear losing this fantastic series. In that the series came down to a last minute goal, logic alone tells you that the intentional injury supplied the margin for victory. So these facts undermine the 'victory' and shows that Canada was willing to resort to criminal action in order to win. Oh, no, Canada!
Was this review helpful to you?
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
Format:Kindle Edition
I researched and downloaded this book after watching the cable sports special of similar title, and this, if possible, is even better, which is saying something. This hockey series transcended sport in many ways, both creative and destructive. This book is such an interesting reminder of a time in world political history that is completely foreign to anyone born after the Wall came down, and is a probably fading memory to many who lived through it. This book brought it right back. Being told by a real student of the game makes for an even more impactful story. And what a great portrait of some of the most legendary names in the modern game. Peter Mahavolich taught at a hockey camp I attended as a bantam and he was a giant then. Even more so now.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?

More About the Author

Roy MacSkimming has published four novels and three works of non-fiction. His two historical novels, "Macdonald" and "Laurier in Love", delve with insight and passion into the private lives of Canada's first prime minister, John A. Macdonald, and first French-Canadian prime minister, Wilfrid Laurier. "Macdonald" was acclaimed by the Toronto Globe & Mail as "an engaging novel handled with imagination, sympathy and verve, making a hugely enjoyable read." About "Laurier in Love", the Vancouver Sun said "MacSkimming's prose places Laurier in some of the most erotically charged situations ever penned for a prime minister."

Roy MacSkimming's study of Canadian book publishing, "The Perilous Trade", was a finalist for the National Business Book Award and described in the Globe & Mail as "a brilliantly seductive cultural history of Canada" and "indispensable". MacSkimming has also written two books of hockey history, "Gordie: A Hockey Legend" ("an excellent biography of Gordie Howe": The Sporting News) and "Cold War: The Amazing Canada-Soviet Hockey Series of 1972."

MacSkimming is currently at work on "The Secret History of John A.", a novel based on Macdonald's little-known early life. He lives in Perth, Ontario.

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Look for Similar Items by Category


ARRAY(0xa5dc839c)