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The Color of Crime (Second Edition): Racial Hoaxes, White Fear, Black Protectionism, Police Harassment, and Other Macroaggressions (Critical America) Paperback – December 1, 2008

ISBN-13: 978-0814776186 ISBN-10: 0814776183 Edition: 2nd

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Product Details

  • Series: Critical America
  • Paperback: 223 pages
  • Publisher: NYU Press; 2 edition (December 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0814776183
  • ISBN-13: 978-0814776186
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #190,638 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Feigenson and Spiesel persuasively argue for a more critical and contextualizing approach to the growing flood of digital imagery in the courtroom. Given the enormous power of imagery to sway opinions and the innovative ways in which visuals can now be presented, judges, jurors, and especially lawyers are obligated to know how to interrogate these new forms of evidence and explication. Law on Display serves as a timely and comprehensive introduction to digital visual literacy in the legal system."-Fred Ritchin, author of "After Photography"

About the Author

Katheryn Russell-Brown is Professor of Law and Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Race Relations at the University of Florida’s Levin College of Law. She is the author of Protecting Our Own: Race, Crime, and African Americans and Underground Codes: Race, Crime, and Related Fires (NYU Press).


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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 8 people found the following review helpful By SimpleIntellect on February 19, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book should be required reading for both academics and average-Joes alike who are interested in the role that race has played and continues to play in the American criminal justice system--or those who are interested in the American racial order at all. Russell-Brown skillfully lays out the historical development of race in our justice system, and she shows how our current system (including the laws themselves, the implementation of the law, etc.) is a legacy of this race-based past. She does a great job presenting the facts without using too much complicated academic jargon or being preachy--and her adherence to just the facts makes it difficult for dissenters to make reasonable claims of an unfounded slant. Read this book for an insightful take on race and the criminal justice system.
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3 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Bob on February 14, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is left wing garbage. I can barely read a page without getting lost, all the author talks about in the first chapter is why minority groups are not represented especially native Americans. She needs to research history before she makes a fool out of herself writing this garbage. Anybody who has read a college history book knows what happened to the Indians when the United States expanded it's territory. This book is just so bad I can only read a page at a time. The author writes about how minorities are under represented and I think: stop your whining. I haven't got past the first chapter but it seems like this book is just a big rant about why this society is the way it is. I didn't know you can write a book about ranting topics and make money off it. I am going to write a book and just rant like this author and maybe I can make a living off of ranting.
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2 of 7 people found the following review helpful By D.H. on December 18, 2012
Format: Paperback
Dr. Russell-Brown's text is required reading for most undergraduate and graduate-level courses on race and crime, and for good reason. I have read dozens of books on the matter and I always come back to this one as a source of reference. Plus, it will difficult to find another book on the topic that does not reference this text (first edition). I think the second edition is even better than the first. It's more inclusive (racially) and, of course, includes more contemporary issues that should make it easier for anyone to grasp the connections between societal construction of race and its consequences for the criminal justice system. Despite what the previous reviewer stated, Dr. Russell-Brown does an excellent job of not only using crime statistics, but also pointing out how official statistics can sometimes be misleading. I would highly recommend it to anyone who is actually open to receiving information that may not conform to preconceived notions about race and crime.
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6 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Ernest on November 6, 2010
Format: Paperback
In this book Katheryn Russell-Brown discusses black Americans and the criminal justice system. Specifically, this book focuses on how different racial groups are depicted by the media, present racial discrimination that black Americans face in the course of their everyday lives, the history of race and criminal justice in the United States, black and white views of the O.J. Simpson case, racial hoaxes (real or fictional crimes where the crime is falsely imputed to a person of a different race), white crime and how many Americans are undereducated in sociology, specifically race and crime.

In "Media Messages" she shows that the media shapes how we view certain racial groups in American society and the way that different racial groups are portrayed. In the "Skin Game" she discusses some of the current discrimination faced by black Americans. In "History's Strange Fruit" she discusses the criminal law for black slaves and demonstrates that blacks have always been treated more harshly that whites under the American criminal justice system. Further, she mentions racists attacks that blacks suffered by the hands of white Americans and principles she feels are necessary for an equitable criminal justice system. In "Discrimination Or Disparity?" she notes that while blacks do commit a disproportionate share of the crime, they are also discriminated against in the criminal justice system. Further, she notes how many criminologists and sociologists incorrectly argue that there is no or little discrimination by focusing only on certain parts of the criminal processing instead of presenting a holistic view. She notes that even with low levels of discrimination, this can cause damages to individuals, families and communities of color. In "Are We Still Talking About OJ?
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