Buy Used
$3.99
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Fast Shipping - Safe and Secure Bubble Mailer!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Color Index: Over 1100 Color Combinations, CMYK and RGB Formulas, for Print and Web Media Turtleback – April 12, 2002


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Turtleback
"Please retry"
$3.26 $0.01

There is a newer edition of this item:

Best%20Books%20of%202014
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
12 Days of Kindle Book Deals
Load your library with Amazon's editors' picks, $2.99 or less each today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Index
  • Turtleback: 360 pages
  • Publisher: HOW Books (April 12, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1581802366
  • ISBN-13: 978-1581802368
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 4.7 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.7 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (59 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #626,855 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Jim Krause has worked as a designer in the Pacific Northwest since the 1980s. He has produced award-winning work for clients large and small, including Microsoft, McDonald's, Washington Apples, Bell Helicopter, Paccar/Kenworth, Northern Trust and Seattle Public Schools. He lives in Bellingham, Washington.

More About the Author

Jim Krause has worked as a designer in the Pacific Northwest since the 1980s. He has produced award-winning work for clients large and small, including Microsoft, McDonald's, Kodak, Cingular Wireless, Washington Apples, Levi Strauss, Paccar/Kenworth, and Seattle Public Schools. Jim Krause has written over a dozen books on design, creativity, and digital photography. His books are widely popular, are on sale around the world, and several have been translated into multiple languages.

Krause's latest books are Visual Design and Color For Designers--both published by New Riders. These two books are the first two titles in New Rider's Creative Core series.

When Jim Krause isn't working on books, he can usually be found racing his motorcycle, riding a bicycle, hiking, reading, enjoying a really good cup of espresso, or looking at birds through a pair of binoculars.

Customer Reviews

This book is great for people who get stuck in a rut of using the same color schemes time after time.
heather_29
Tasteful use of color can make or break a web or print design, and this book is an invaluable tool in that endeavor.
Travis Miller
The color listings are in CMYK and RGB including a small section of Browser Safe colors in the back of the book.
A. Farrington

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

111 of 120 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Laskevitch on February 21, 2004
Format: Turtleback Verified Purchase
This book provides a designer with a fabulous resource for generating color schemes/combinations quickly and easily. In that respect, it inspires.
However, the author provides recipes (CMYK and RGB values) "checked for accuracy", never stating on what media those values may be valid. He then excuses himself by saying that "the potential for error exists". The implication that a set of CMYK values is in any way "accurate" beyond the inks and papers used for this particular publication is so, eh, mid-1990s. A true, but technically more challenging statement of the color values should have been made with device independent Lab values. Then anyone with Adobe Photoshop, for example, could reproduce the samples on his or her own media. This is, in fact, what Pantone does.
And aspiring web designers beware! The author clearly has little but old and second-hand knowledge of the facts of color on the web. He describes the anachronistic "browser safe" colors as if most computer users still had old 8-bit (256 color) monitors, and as if there was ever color consistency across them. In those bad old days we fought dithering (the "speckles") in solid fills by choosing from amongst the 216 colors Macs and PC monitors had in common.
Those days, except for some dusty intranets here and there, are gone. deceased. expired. However, neither then nor now could we count on consistency on our viewers' monitors--unless we can strongarm our audience into calibrating and profiling them.
These particular rants aside (the writer sighs benignly), the color examples are truly wonderful, useful, and inspiring.
In short, fabulous for samples, but not for accuracy of data.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
44 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Gwyneth Calvetti VINE VOICE on March 5, 2005
Format: Turtleback
I'd heard about this guide on websites devoted to scrapbooking, and when I finally tracked it down, I almost didn't buy it. I looked at it and thought, "What the heck?" It is pages and pages of color combinations, arranged according to color groupings, with suggested "moods," like "retro." So what? I thought.

However, my respect for the work of those who'd recommended it overcame my initial doubts. As a designer in paper arts, I tend to get into my color ruts, and choose the same basic color combos. "Color Index" has helped me break out of my rut in a couple of different ways.

Sometimes, when I just don't feel inspired, I'll simply sit down with the book and page through it, tabbing color combinations I find interesting or appealing. Later, when I'm working in my studio, I'll take a look at the tabbed combos for ideas I can use.

Other times, I may know of one color I want to use for a design, but am stuck for accents to use. I'll take the paper I've chosen, page through the combinations and take into consideration those "moods" as well. I've discovered many combinations of color I'd never have considered otherwise, like tan with deep burgundy, accented by bright turquoise. Sounds like a bizarre mix, but it worked for that project, which was eventually published by a major scrapbooking magazine.

The book isn't flashy like other design books, but I've found it to be a dependable while inspiring workhorse in my studio.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
30 of 32 people found the following review helpful By "trebo12" on April 3, 2002
Format: Turtleback
This is the color book to end all other color books! Not only does Jim list the CMYK, but RGB and HEX too! Not only does he have the standard rectangle color blocks but an intricate pattern of the colors AND the colors in an illustration! He also gives comments on how to brainstorm for creative ideas as I'm sure he did in the 'Ideas Index' book. He also lists some of the colors that are trendy at this time which was so helpful.
There are Web and Browser safe colors, logo ideas and the lists goes on! I was smiling as I went through it last night - and that has NEVER happened! My creativity was so fueled, couldn't wait to get up this morning to get started on SOMETHING - ANYTHING! I am so impressed! I've bought and returned so many color guides but this 'little' book has made a HUGE impact and makes the 'Color Harmony' series books 'pale' in comparison! You will NOT be sorry!!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By "sage@mailops.com" on July 1, 2002
Format: Turtleback
I have more reference books on design than, well... more than I care to count. These include a number on color - but most guides are really fixated on Pantone - which is odd considering that 4-color work is more common.
This book is always by my side. Its schemes are fantastic in cmyk, rbg and websafe. Its categories are much better than most of the color guides I've seen (and bought).
What's more - its size and sturdy plastic covers are great - and unlike almost every other design reference book I own - THE BINDING IS SEWN - so THE PAGES WON'T FALL OUT. There is nothing more infuriating than a good reference that falls apart before it even gets a good try. Everyone else who reviewed this book mentioned its many other fine points. But I have to add this one, particularly after the glue on one of my Robin William's books melted on a first read. This BOOK IS VIRTUALLY INDESTRUCTIBLE. Worth every penny!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Nigel G Wright on May 30, 2002
Format: Turtleback
As a graphic designer, I already have a good sense of what colors go together. However, this indespensible little book can speed up the process of design. I can't tell you how many times I've picked it up, found the color scheme that worked with a certain project, and punched in the RGB or CMYK numbers that accompany each color scheme. The book is divided into color scheme "types" depending on the mood. For example, sections include Progressive, Muted, Browser Safe (useful for web design), etc. And at the price it's being sold for, can you go wrong? The other books in the series are great too, but this is the "must have" volume in the series. Hope that helps.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews