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Colossians (The Anchor Yale Bible Commentaries) Paperback – March 7, 2005


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Product Details

  • Series: The Anchor Yale Bible Commentaries
  • Paperback: 580 pages
  • Publisher: Yale University Press (March 7, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 030013987X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0300139877
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,941,961 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

The Apostle Paul's epistle to the Colossians provides an intimate glimpse into the life of a first century Christian community as it struggled to define Christian theology and practice. Paul was prompted to address this fledgling Christian assembly when he heard that "false teachers" had joined its midst and were promulgating heretical and threateningtheories. His impassioned letter to the Colossians urges them to embrace a life in Christ and proclaims Christ as master of all of creation. In their astute commentary, New Testament sch Markus Barth and Helmut Blanke recreate the of first century Christians, and examine the multitude of outside influences--from cold, rational Hellenistic philosophy to exclusive, ethereal Gnostic thought--that often threatened Christian theology. Colossians not only provides a new and carefully balanced analysis of this pivotal New Testament text, but also traces the development of early Christian thought as it gradually spread throughout the Roman Empire. Detailed enough for any scholar, Colossians is designed for general readers. Anyone who wants to enter the dynamic world of early Christianity and witness the shaping of the faith from its very roots will benefit from this remarkable work. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Inside Flap

The Apostle Paul's letter to the Colossians offers a valuable and intimate glimpse into the life of a fledgling Christian community as it struggled to define Christian doctrine and theology. Paul was prompted to write to the Colossian assembly when he heard that "false teachers" had joined the congregation and were advocating dangerous, non-Christian practices. In an effort to appear superior, these heretical teachers were luring Christians to exercise asceticism, moral rigorism, and esoteric rituals, hallmarks of other "mystery" and pagan cults. In his passionate letter, Paul denounces these extreme and elitist practices and firmly defends a life in Christ. He proclaims that pure, simple worship of Christ alone is the most powerful statement of faith.

In their astute and lucid commentary, eminent New Testament scholars Markus Barth and Helmut Blanke re-create the turbulent age of the birth of Christianity and examine the myriad of "outside" influences -- from cold, rational Hellenistic philosophy to exclusive, ethereal Gnostic thought -- that often threatened the evolution of Christian theology. Colossians not only provides a new and carefully balanced analysis of this pivotal New Testament text, but also chronicles the development of Christian thought as it gradually spread throughout the Roman Empire --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By David C. Leaumont on December 8, 2009
Format: Paperback
Markus Barth is a German theologian and son of the famous Karl Barth. The commentary was originally in German and translated to English, despite Barth spending much of his life in America teaching and preaching in Reformed and Evangelical ministries. The commentary was primarily written by Barth, yet was completed by others when his health began to fail. Of the volumes of the Anchor Bible, this addition (Volume 34B) stands out as one of its most highly thought of commentaries.

Many commentaries on Colossians are shoehorned into a volume with another of Paul's epistles (most commonly Ephesians and Philemon, as in NICNT, but also with Philippians and Philemon, as in the NAC). There are great discussions on Colossians that are missed when this is undertaken. Of the commentaries on Colossians, few go into as great detail as Barth and Blanke. They dig deep into the purpose and authorship of the epistle exiting with a view of Pauline authorship combating a Jewish/pagan heresy. For instance, the authors spend nearly 130 of the 550+pages discussing these topics from many different viewpoints. As the authors proceed through the text of Colossians, they begin with an English translation of a segment, then they provide two sections of commentary beginning with Notes (technical discussion) and proceeding to Comments (more pastoral aspects.) Foreign words are transliterated. Thus, Barth's Colossians is accessible to both scholars while remaining pastoral in nature.

The text is one of the most highly readable texts I have encountered in my collection of commentaries. Bauer (An Annotated Guide to Biblical Resources for Ministry) describes the text as "bordering on poetic." I have to agree.

The commentary utilizes footnotes rather than endnotes to preclude flipping back and forth.
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