The Colossus of Maroussi (Second Edition) and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$13.02
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.95
  • Save: $1.93 (13%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 10 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Colossus of Maroussi (Second Edition) (New Directions Paperbook) Paperback – May 18, 2010


See all 32 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$7.00
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.02
$8.78 $7.42
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$8.50
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$4.99

Frequently Bought Together

The Colossus of Maroussi (Second Edition) (New Directions Paperbook) + Greece: A Traveler's Literary Companion (Traveler's Literary Companions) + Dinner with Persephone: Travels in Greece
Price for all three: $37.68

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Series: New Directions Paperbook
  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: New Directions; Second Edition edition (May 18, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0811218570
  • ISBN-13: 978-0811218573
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 6.6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #86,492 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“One of the five greatest travel books of all time. (Pico Iyer)

Miller captures the spirit and warmth of the resilient Greek people in his story of a wartime journey from Athens to Crete. (National Geographic)

Miller’s Colossus of Maroussi, a paean to Greece drawn out of a nine-month visit…is the gestation time for a human and, in Miller’s case, for the imaginative re-creation of a country, a culture and his own fierce energies. (Richard Eder, The New York Times)”

About the Author

Henry Miller (1891—1980) was one of the most controversial American novelists during his lifetime. His book, The Tropic of Cancer, was banned in the some U.S. states before being overruled by the Supreme Court. New Directions publishes several of his books.

Will Self (b. 1961) is an English novelist and journalist. His Independent column of offbeat walking tours, “Psychogeography,” has been collected into an eponymously titled book.

Ian S. MacNiven (b. 1938) edited The Durrell-Miller Letters: 1935-1980.

More About the Author

HENRY MILLER (1891-1980) was an American writer and painter infamous for breaking with existing literary forms and developing a new sort of "novel" that is a mixture of novel, autobiography, social criticism, philosophical reflection, surrealist free association, and mysticism, one that is distinctly always about and expressive of the real-life Henry Miller and yet is also fictional. His most characteristic works of this kind are "Tropic of Cancer," "Tropic of Capricorn," and "Black Spring." His books were banned in the United States for their lewd content until 1964 when a court ruling overturned this order, acknowledging Miller's work as literature in what became one of the most celebrated victories of the sexual revolution.

Customer Reviews

Henry Miller writes about Greece as a lover writes about his love.
Flemming Pless
I will continue to read more of Miller's books and would definately encourage you all to read this one.
AH
Miller's writing has a way of almost making you experience life in Greece.
Ernest Jagger

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

92 of 98 people found the following review helpful By Alekos on January 16, 2000
Format: Paperback
This must be counted among the most peculiar books ever wrtitten about Greece by an Anglophone writer, but it is also among the most truthful and , at least in part, beautiful. Henry Miller states that he approaches Greece with little book learning (p. 89) and considers himself a savage. He is really no savage but we can perhaps call him a barbarian, in the sense that Walt Whitman and Robert Browning are barbarians. This is an important point that distinguishes him from his friend and fellow philhellene writer Lawrence Durrell, who also wrote a good deal about Greece but with another kind of imaginative but more refined sensitivity. The title of this book refers to someone called Katzimbalis, a magnificent raconteur who seems never to have published anything himself but did a lot to promote the work of some important modern Greek poets. (See Edmund Keeley's books for details of the great English-Greek-American literary friendships of the thirties and forties.) But the book is not really about its purported subject. It is about the changes taking place in Greece during the thirties and changes that took place in Miller as a result of his long stay in that country. He presents the experience as mind-altering. The structural pivots of the book are visits to Knossos, Phaestos, Mycenae and Epidaurus. Each of these visits becomes an occasion for meditations on the meaning of life and death, all delivered in the author's peculiarly masculine and barbarian style. But the best writing is found when he deals with the low-lifes of Syntagma Square in Athens, who offer him whores and beautiful young boys. How innocent life was in the thirties. Listing is an important part of Miller's style. He piles up great numbers of nouns or present participles or finite verbs.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
41 of 42 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 7, 2000
Format: Paperback
As a Greek-American reading about Greece in Miller's account written in the 1930's, I found it to be very moving. It isn't simply a travel book about Greece, it's about Greece healing someone's soul!
I absolutely love Miller's, "Tropic of Cancer," and was expecting the same style for Maroussi. However, I was mistaken. Miller doesn't include any of his notorious womanizing stories here. Instead, Miller writes about finding peace in contemplating Greece, modern and ancient. Again, his written prose is like reading poetry. There are some passages from this book that I had to "cut out" and keep for inspiration.
I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in Henry Miller or Greece. I must also recommend Edmund Keeley's, "Inventing Paradise," which is something of a companion to Maroussi. In it, Keeley discusses Miller's Greek journey, which he took along with George Seferis, Lawrence Durrell, and other 20th century Greek poets, writers, and painters.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
59 of 63 people found the following review helpful By Peggy Vincent on August 17, 2003
Format: Paperback
Reading this book (along with a couple by Lawrence Durrell) in my early 20s was the impetus for my husband and me to quit our jobs, put our belongings in storage, sell our 2 cars, and take off with a couple of backpacks for Greece. Miller's ability to render the landscape and the people in the incomparable clarity of Greece's pure air is a rare talent. The Colossus of Maroussi is destined to be read for a long time, for it has a timeless power to transport the reader not only into the mind of the author but also into mind, heart, and soul of the Greek people. They could not have had a more loving and compassionate chronicler than Henry Miller.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
32 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Owen Hughes on April 4, 2000
Format: Paperback
Henry Miller's reputation as a writer needs little verification from the likes of me. Nevertheless, it is a pleasure to be able to confirm the abilities of a truly great author. This example of his work is in some ways a peculiar one since it was written during a turning point in modern history, namely the Second World War, and was inevitably a turning point in Miller's own life as well.
Henry Miller has not always had kind things to say about his native U. S. A. Here, in "The Colossus of Maroussi," he uses the American state as a kind of false backdrop for his discoveries in Greece. For Greece is the central geographical landscape on which he builds. Far from being a travelogue, however, it is a story of that ancient land and some of its people; Miller uses the fabric of Greek life to weave a story of mankind.
His writing is distinctly dated today, but delightfully so. It is full of a poetic imagery that is almost entirely absent from the main stream of post-modern literature. As such, it is very complex writing which occasionally seems to be almost self-serving, as if the author was writing for no one but himself. In the main, it is a very accessible book that tries to reach out in pure, non-political terms to touch the essential core of what is man. At the present time, we could do well to review our own situation in life, and one way of doing so is by simply reviewing the literature on the subject. I recommend "The Colossus of Maroussi" as a place to start. Besides being the work of a truly formidable writer, it will take you to places you probably never dreamed existed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 21, 1998
Format: Paperback
This is a small book with a big heart, an eloquent and enlightening memoir of Greece, where Henry Miller stayed briefly prior to leaving Europe for America at the begining of World War II. It is perhaps his best literary effort. For those who know Miller only through Tropic of Cancer or any of his other controversial books, pick this up today. If your local vendor doesn't have it, order it. Your eyes will be opened not only to the sun-drenched beauty of a country, but to the kind and loving genius of a man. You will see how truly visionary, human, and humane Miller was as he recounts his experiences and the people he befriended. His reflections are poetry here, his recollections sheer magic. You will be left with the knowledge of having experienced someone undergoing a spiritual transformation, and of being freed yourself. That is the book's gift to any reader. A country was never given a greater love letter. It is olives, bread and wine for the soul.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?