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Coloured and Other Stories Kindle Edition

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Length: 118 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled

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Product Details

  • File Size: 375 KB
  • Print Length: 118 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Smashwords (December 27, 2013)
  • Publication Date: December 27, 2013
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B005QRPDP4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #27,963 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Mohanalakshmi Rajakumar's award winning books have focused on various aspects of life in the Arabian Gulf nation of Qatar. From Dunes to Dior is a collection of essays related to her experiences as a female South Asian American living in the Arabian Gulf and named as Indie Book of the Day in 2013. Love Comes Later is a literary romance set in Qatar and London and was the winner of the Best Indie Book Award for Romance in 2013, short listed for the New Talent award by the Festival of Romance, and Best Novel Finalist in eFestival of Words, 2013. She currently lives with her family in Qatar, where she teaches writing and literature courses at American universities.

After she joined the e-book revolution, Mohana dreams in plotlines. Learn more about her work on her website at www.mohadoha.com or follow her latest on Twitter: @moha_doha.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Phoebe on December 19, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
The stories in Coloured are instantly absorbing- which is a triumph with short stories where the writer only has a limited number of pages to win you over.
One reason I read is because books give you an insight to a world you do not know, and this is exactly what this collection does with humour and honesty.
In fact, the stories reminded me of Jhumpa Lahiri's short story collection UNACCUSTOMED EARTH, which is one of my favourites.
and as a side note, eBook readers do seem to be made for short stories, the perfect 'dip in, dip out' device!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By CabinGoddess on January 13, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Ten tales of the experiences not only immigrants both men and women, but those of American's who happen to not be *sarcastic mock look of horror* who are not white! The stories within this collection had me smiling, laughing, frustrated, at times incensed.

Having read and been a part of some of Moha Doha's social circles I was already well aware of her background and her style of writing in some form or another and I have read two of her and considered myself prepared for ten amazing literary shorts, I can say without a doubt she caught me way off gaurd.

Some of these tales fit what I had read, such as "Truth" which is a wake up call to a young woman who was raised with big brothers in America and her family, for the most part, is to her American-ized. She goes to University, is a bit snooty, doesn't believe what she is reading about what she perceives is the truth about her families Indian Culture till one family gathering she learns a very hard lesson about truth and just how lucky she is. The style was tight and to the point and brilliantly presented.

"Food", of course I am going to talk about this story. It is a story about attraction, about office relationships, about shame and tastes and it made me angry, hungry for curry and pizza with the works, and wanting to smack an idealistic character of the "office friend" who makes you feel like an idiot despite the fact you are the better employee. Who is popular with the co-workers around the water cooler, who is a friend, but not really a friend, and who has made you feel inferior? Who would have thought the issue of food could do this? Yes, sorry, I gone a bit off-track but as a writer of short stories, and a fan of The Canterbury Tales I am a bit obsessed with the proper use of the idealistic character.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Teahookah33 on December 17, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
In a slim collection of short stories, the trials and triumphs of life as a South Indian immigrant in the United States are told. A young girl, American educated and Indian born, the only daughter in a family of boys, learns exactly how precious she is to her parents. A young English schooled Indian man learns the stark realities of racism in a Texas bar. A young woman feels so racially intimidated that even warming up her curry in the workplace microwave becomes a daily fear for her. A new bride struggles with the stigma of being childless and the temptation of forbidden American men.

Each story carries its own distinct flavor and protagonist, weaving its prose into your heart without using extreme shock tactics or exploiting easy avenues like shaming white Americans or spitting upon life within a conservative Indian family. Yes racism happens in some of the stories, to varying degrees, sometimes violent but mostly of the cold condescending sort that is quite familiar to anyone of color who has had to endure it in school or at work. (It's a sort of racism that the perpetrators often do not realize they're inflicting, one I am quite familiar with experiencing and actually am quite delighted to see so accurately portrayed in some of these stories.) Yes, also, there are stories portraying an Indian protagonist feeling a level of embarrassment at their own culture, yearning for their families to "be more American" so they would fit in better with their peers, but there is no hint of whining self pity about it. It's part of what makes each of these stories so very readable and approachable. It's possible to sympathize with these characters without feeling put on the spot, or judgmental of them.

I can't say I felt let down by any of these stories.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Kulsoom F Rizvi on July 24, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
Coloured and Other Stories is a collection of vivid, emotionally rich, and intricately woven tales about family, romance, and the search for identity. As a South-Asian American, I felt that the stories called out to my own experience. What's good about it though, is that the themes are universal enough to capture the attention and hearts of those who haven't lived the bi-cultural experience.

Be ready for evocative stories that propel you to reflect! I especially loved the imagery and emotion of "Tree" and the unique progression of "Dasi".
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Michelle C. Jordan on May 2, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
I was captured by the title of this collection of stories. Colored and Other Stories, a title to hold attention. I was curious in what angle the stories would be told, what message given... sent with the hope it will be grasped by the readers.I wondered would it be history? A retelling of lives lived?

Well, I stopped questioning and I opened the book. I fell into the world of the various peoples that were affected individually by the outside world for the color of their skin, their traditions as well as from their own culture.

Ranging from Dashi, a prisoner of her own society's tradition to Ganesh, judged for the color of his skin, except by the one who sacrificed herself, regardless of the fact that she was the color of those who caused the torment...she helped Ganesh, because she saw more in him.

The stories were told with a lyrical quality, that did not stay focused on the negatives, but showed the hope, that was to be found by the characters in their individual stories, and the love given to them by those that surrounded them.

The stories, touched my own emotions that ranged from tears to anger and then finally joy.

These are stories that are important, that can open eyes, give understanding, if the reader is open to receive. Even today, the messages in the stories are relevant...I recommend this book to all ages, because all can find a gem that will give understanding in relating to one another...not just on the subject of race, but just as human beings.
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