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Combat Rock (Doctor Who) Paperback – October 27, 2003

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Product Details

  • Series: Doctor Who (BBC Paperback)
  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Random House UK (October 27, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0563538554
  • ISBN-13: 978-0563538554
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 4.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,296,662 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Jason A. Miller VINE VOICE on January 1, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is a book about cannibals. It's about savagery and terrorism, blood and grist and, roughly five thousand corpses. On the rain-forest archipelago of the planet Jenggel, the primitive natives of the island Papul are returning to their cannibalistic ways, after the mummified corpses of their ancient tribal leaders return to life. On the "pleasure island" of Batu, seven punk-rock hit men are gathering, on orders from Jenggel's President, to kill a lot of people and thus justify the President's naked power grab. In the opening teaser (which is never connected up to the rest of the book), a soldier impliedly murders a woman and her baby, and that's pretty much the lightest moment on offer.
Author Lewis gives us a detailed setting: we learn the names of all the islands, and their major cities; we learn how the inhabitants of each island are different from one another. There are discourses on commerce, trade, and leisure. I started reading all this while on a business trip in Puerto Rico, so the tourist in me was satisfied.
Lewis is the anarchist of the "Doctor Who" range. His previous book, "Rags" was about a punk rock band whose music kills. That one I bought in a graveyard, in the World Trade Center Borders in the summer of 2001. "Combat Rock" is about what you'd expect from the author of "Rags": 100% downbeat from start to finish, with no sympathy or mercy spared for anybody. Lewis's lone moment of generosity comes from sparing the lives of two members of the guest cast.
Once you desensitize, and let the blood and gore wash gently over you, there are interesting things to be learned about the Second Doctor and his Season 5 companions, Jamie and Victoria.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Tommy Two Tone on November 13, 2003
Format: Paperback
Over the years, I've grown to appreciate the Troughton era far more than I did when I was a gaffer. Much has been written about the 'family' atmosphere of this period in the show's history, which tends to perhaps overshadow the fine writing that often accompanied it. But in many fans' minds, this was Who at its most comfortable, the least edgy.
Which it wasn't. The Web of Fear, anyone? The ending of The War Games? Which really doesn't make Combat Rock at that much of a shock, at least to me.
The book is a fine combination of the subgenre of horror writing best described as 'splatterpunk' with a deep affection for the era of the Second Doctor. At first, it doesn't seem this can actually work, but it does. The more adult threats--especially concerning Victoria and lascivious soldiers--are a bit jarring, but are handled well, and realistically so. As for the Doctor, he views the horror around him with the sad shock we would expect. This rings true, and it makes Combat Rock work as a book.
If there is any problem with the book, it may be with the ending. The introduction of a purely 'Who' type villian didn't really work for me, not after all that had gone before. But still, this was a fine read, and I look forward to more of Mick's Who work.
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Format: Paperback
Sometimes the stories where you don't necessarily need the Doctor are the most fascinating, because you can either stick him in a scenario that he might not actually fit in, or we can watch him watch events spiral out of control in a fashion that lives him unable to do anything about it so it becomes just a matter of survival until we reach the inevitable climax and he can stagger back into the TARDIS vowing to never mention this adventure again.

I'm sure I can think of examples where this does work, but after reading this I have to admit that it sounds better in theory than actual practice.

This time out, the Second Doctor, Jamie and Victoria (a team built for combat if there ever was one) land on a planet where the native Papuli have been subjugated by the Indoni. Needless to say some tensions exist and the crew happens to land right when revolutionaries are starting to shoot at each other and even more interesting, the dead starting shooting poisonous snakes out of their mouths at innocent tourists. Immediately, of course, everyone gets separated.

This comes across as a story that the author wanted to do but was unable to get it published except as a "Doctor Who" story so he had to figure out a way to shoehorn our favorite time traveling Time Lord into the mix. Because, really, the contrast between the tone the Doctor brings on board and the tone of the story is exceedingly jarring. For a good portion of the novel the Doctor and company wind up seeming like guest stars in their own story, each of them being trapped with a different band of mercenaries and for the most part are along for the ride, having very little effect on the plot.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This dr who book took me a long time to read. I found it hard to read because it just was not that good. The mercenaries in the book were revolting to read about. A lot of graphic death was portrayed here. I like to read dr Who for sci fi romp, not a horror novel. I understand that characters die in these books, but does it have to be so graphic?...The overall story was kinda Ok, but still stretched it a lot. I understand that war is not pretty, and the things that men do to others in war is not as well, but give me a story that shows individuals trying to rise above that is what I ask. Even in war, man can rise above the baseless violence at times. maybe that is just me.....The book just was violent and hard to read for me. Other books, such as the tv episodes redone to print are much better stories to read. they have better character development and plot. Find those books.
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