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Combat Stress Injury: Theory, Research, and Management (Routledge Psychosocial Stress Series) Hardcover

ISBN-13: 978-0415954334 ISBN-10: 0415954339 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Series: Routledge Psychosocial Stress Series
  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (December 4, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415954339
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415954334
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #196,973 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"…Charles Figley and William P. Nash have made a significant and cogent contribution that helps to frame combat stress injury and interventions in a refreshing and helpful paradigm. Figley and Nash have done an impressive job of arraying 30 professionals whose contributions help frame the complex interplay of the mental and emotional wounds that too often result from the trauma of combat, and these authors identify ways to prevent and/or manage the potential consequences of operational deployments. The editors have challenged their contributors to help military commanders by providing those leaders, who bear primary responsibility for the welfare of their war fighters, with the necessary tools to help preserve the fighting strength and protect the long-term health of them military member and his or her family. On all accounts, Figley and Nash have powerfully and significantly achieved what they set out to do. To effectively position health-care providers, the clergy, and commanders to handle [the] collective expression of operational fatigue and stress, Figley and Nash offer the right paradigm at the right time."   - Thomas J. Williams, PsycCRITIQUES, Contemporary Psychology: APA Review of Books

"Both editors of Combat Stress Injury have boots-on-the-ground military experience, as well as being a practicing psychologist (Figley) and physician (Nash), and it shows in their selection of chapters addressing PTSD and related mental health syndromes associated with combat. This book is a great place to start for professionals who are serious about understanding the unique tribulations of our uniformed service members who live with the prospect of death and disablement to preserve what we all value." - Laurence Miller, PhD, International Journal of Emergency Mental Health

About the Author

Charles R. Figley, Ph.D., CT, MT, is President and Founder of the Green Cross Foundation and Professor at the School of Social Work at Florida State University. He is founder and director of the FSU Traumatology Institute (formerly the Psychosocial Stress Research and Development Program). He is an elected Fellow of the APA, APS, AAMFT, the American Association for the Applied Psychology, and the American Orthopsychiatric Association. Figley is the Founding President of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (ISTSS). He is a longtime Taylor & Francis author, and currently serves as the consulting editor of the Psychosocial Stress Series.

William P. Nash, M.D., is a Captain, Medical Corps, United States Navy, and Operational Stress Control and Readiness (OSCAR) Program Psychiatrist, 1st Marine Division, Camp Pendleton, CA. Dr. Nash is also an Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, UC San Diego


More About the Author

Yep, 2012 is my best year of publishing since 1989 when I published both Stress in Families (Routledge) and Helping Traumatized Families (Jossey-Bass). In 2012 I published the second edition of Helping Traumatized Families with co-author Lauren Kiser, a professor at the University of Maryland's Medical School. But the first book published in 2012 was The Encyclopedia of Trauma: An Interdisciplinary Guide (Sage). The third book published in 2012 is Treating Traumatic Stress Injuries in Military Personnel: An EMDR Practitioner's Guide (Routledge Psychosocial Stress Series). And in mid-2013 will be the book that took the most time: First Do No SELF Harm: Understanding and Promoting Physician Stress Resilience (Oxford University Press).

My books have focused on helping others. In my first book, Stress Disorders among Vietnam Veterans (1978), gave no indication that I was a vet myself; there was no self disclosure. In recent years, particularly Mapping Trauma and its Wake (2005, Routledge), I describe my decision to enter the Marine Corps rather than going to William and Mary college after graduation.

I would love to hear what you think of my books. My phone number at Tulane University is 504-862-3473 but the best way to communicate with me is via email which is figley@tulane.edu.
Warm regards,
Charles

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By David C. Young on March 26, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'm a therapist who often works with returning soliders from the Iraq & Afghan war, and I also train mental health workers to work with these soliders. I found this book, like most in Figley's series, to be generally a good update, but with many chapters not terribly relevant, two sad omissions, and a disappointing treatment section.

The best stuff: Section I, written mostly by the second editor, William P. Nash, a naval psychiatrist who has worked in Iraq. His three chapters (one co-written) represent the high point -- generally taking 30 years of Stress-Oriented PTSD theory, research and treatment, and applying them to these current wars. For those, like me, who've mainly worked with Viet Nam veterans, this helped bring me up-to-date with the current wars' realities. And he did a nice, unbiased review of other, non-stress views of PTSD/war trauma treatment. He's especially good in locating the "culture" problems of admitting PTSD, both in individual soldiers and in the military at-large. I found these chapters (2-4), plus Chapter 6, on the links of physical injury and PTSD (all together about a third of the book), well worth buying the book. Among other things, they put paid to that nasty claim (which resurfaced in the Army during this war, to our shame!) that PTSD is linked to a "pre-existent personality disorder". Certainly new traumas bring back earlier traumas, but it's clear: the cause of combat PTSD is combat.

Here, however, there were two sadly disappointing & serious omissions.
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Format: Hardcover
Military mental health experts tell us that the "signature injuries" in returning veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars will be posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI). If that's true, then books like the present come at just the right time. Both editors of Combat Stress Injury have boots-on-the-ground military experience, as well as being a practicing psychologist (Figley) and physician (Nash), and it shows in their selection of chapters addressing PTSD and related mental health syndromes associated with combat.
The book is divided into three sections. The first covers the biological, psychological, and social aspects of combat stress. The level of detail in these chapters might overwhelm the average mental health clinician seeking a basic summary of stress and trauma psychophysiology, but the comprehensiveness of coverage provides a solid scientific foundation for anyone who still thinks that "stress" is some airy-fairy concept cooked up by mental health academics with too much free time. Indeed, a theme that runs through this book is that an adverse reaction to the experience of combat should not necessarily be seen as a "disorder" per se, but rather represents a psychological injury as real as a fractured skull or amputated leg. Also discusse is the individual variability of resilience: why some service members succumb to combat stress injury, while others seem to adapt, and a few even grow stronger.
The chapters in Section II offer a set of studies, including one on the delayed effects of combat stress on long-term mortality, i.e. combat stress can act as a sleeper weapon, coming back to bite the veteran at the tail end of his or her life.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Kurt Eisele on March 10, 2008
Format: Hardcover
PTSD is increasingly recognized as a disease among our servicewomen and men who are returning from combat zones.
The military has been slow to recognize and treat this disease in an effective manner and continues to be deficient in providing enough counselors, psychologists, and psychiatrists to render front line and follow-up treatment.
This book is a great first read for parents, spouses, children, brothers and sisters, and other relatives who want to be well informed about what to expect when their loved one returns.
It is also a good refresher course for those seeking continuing education on the topic.
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