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Come, Let Us Reason: An Introduction to Logical Thinking Paperback – August 1, 1990


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 232 pages
  • Publisher: Baker Academic (August 1, 1990)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801038367
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801038365
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (37 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #311,286 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Norman L. Geisler (Ph.D., Loyola University of Chicago) has taught at top evangelical schools for over fifty years and is distinguished professor of apologetics and theology at Veritas Evangelical Seminary in Murrieta, California. He is the author of more than seventy books, including the Baker Encyclopedia of Christian Apologetics.

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Customer Reviews

This book is great from start to finish.
K.H.
A conclusion may be true (such as a tautology, for instance), but if it does not follow from its premises, then the argument is still invalid.
amazonianberean
I recommend this not-boaring-at-all book to anyone who takes thinking seriously and wants a concise look into logic.
stevegarcia@integrityonline7.com

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

55 of 61 people found the following review helpful By K.H. on October 1, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is an excellent introduction into the basic formulas and terminology of logic. All basics are covered: Syllogism, inductive, deductive, dilemma's, and so on. The reviewer from Vancover, WA, who unfairly rates this book low, brings up that Godel and Brouwer have demonstrated the inability of logic (paraphased);But didn't they use logic to reach that conclusion? - yes they did. Without logical thinking, all our statements and beliefs become nonsensical! Either logic is used or abused.
Geisler and Brooks have written a great text and its only real (possible) flaw is that it is written from a conservative Christian viewpoint. Myself a Christian, I do see problems with people who will unfairly rate this book low or not give it a fair reading because of the overtly Christian stance. With that said, this is also the book's strength, because many Christians need to learn logic and may turn to this book because of the Geilser and Brook's religious position.
The chapters on "informal fallacies" and "scientific thinking" are extremely well written for the primer level. This book is great from start to finish.
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26 of 28 people found the following review helpful By stevegarcia@integrityonline7.com on October 29, 1998
Format: Paperback
I recommend this not-boaring-at-all book to anyone who takes thinking seriously and wants a concise look into logic. This book is a must for those who have never studied logic, as it teaches how to identify correct and incorrect thinking. This book reads like a text book, as it gives you exercises to complete in order that you apply what you learn. Geisler looks at logic with Theology (his primary discipline) to clarify the rules of logic, which I don't think is a deterrent (to the unbiased), in that it does not detract from the study of logic itself, but rather gives us examples to sink our teeth into. There's plenty of incorrect thinking in our society, & this book helps one to see through the bad arguments proposed.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Bill Ramey on July 25, 1999
Format: Paperback
The main strength of this book is its thorough catalog of informal fallacies, accompanied by a glossary for easy reference. Although overtly Christian in tone, it is suitable for anyone interested in informal logic.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Edward J. Vasicek on September 22, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is not meant for casual reading (you have to think to understand this one), but it can help enlighten the casual reader (who does not want to study) if he/she skims through the first 90 pages (which require some study of terms and differences)and then coasts through the rest. Geisler and Brooks are Christian thinkers who understand thinking and logic, and they present the major components of logical thinking in a Christian context.

The authors explain syllogisms and differentiate between a valid conclusion and an invalid conclusion. They also distinguish validity from actual truth (valid conclusions are not always actually true in reality; they are merely logically based on the premises presented). That's the stuff addressed in the first 90 pages.

But the best part (and most enjoyable for me)began with chapter 6, "Informal Fallacies." This section was lighter reading. Since this is an election year, it would be a study in itself to compare political commentaries and supposed answers to questions with the logic presented in this volume!

Since the authors are serious students of Scripture and Geisler is a celebrated Theologian, most of their examples come from familiar Bible texts or theological issues. Although I have stronger convictions about Sovereign Grace than do the authors, I really found their examples useful in the realm of hermenutics (Bible interpretation). They are solid defenders of an inerrant Bible and ethical interpretation.

If you want to brush up your thinking skills, this might be a good place to start. "Fit Bodies, Fat Minds" by Os Guiness persuades us that the use of the mind has been neglected in evangelical communities, and Geisler and Brooks have written a work to help properly activate those little grey cells. Not really an easy read, and not for everyone, but a meaningful mind stretcher.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 9, 1997
Format: Paperback
In my opinion, everyone should read a book on logic and argumentation to clear up the way he thinks. The advantage of this book over the others on the same topic is that Geisler's book:

- is not "dry" and boring as are many book on formal logic

- is still very clear, unlike many books on informal logic

- succeed in teaching a lot in a limited space

I can recommend it. The contents are:

1 The Whats and Why of logic

2 Building blocks

3 Basic logical structures

4 Other types of syllogism

5 Formal fallacies

6 Informal fallacies

7 Uncovering logic in literature

8 Introduction to induction

9 Scientific thinking

10 Fallacies in scientific thinking

Each chapter is followed by exercised, the answers are at the end of the book
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21 of 26 people found the following review helpful By amazonianberean on March 16, 2004
Format: Paperback
The reviewer Daniel J. Paszak "Diogenes" criticizes this book because it claims that a tautology is invalid. If the reviewer, however, bothered to read p. 23, he'd see that "there is a difference between truth and validity." A conclusion may be true (such as a tautology, for instance), but if it does not follow from its premises, then the argument is still invalid. This is a standard logical system. See the definition of "valid" in Copi and Cohen, Introduction to Logic. Also, this book does not claim that "-p or -q" is "-(p or q)." Look again. The authors are not unaware of De Morgan's theorem.

Furthermore, it exasperates me when reviewers like Truth seeker "a reader from NY" say that they are surprised to see that this is a book that assumes/promotes Christianity. Or when other reviewers like John L. Davis say that the use of biblical references is distracting. Duh! Look at the back cover and see what the book is about and who the author is! This is one of those "logic texts intended explicitly for Christians." Geisler is "one of evangelicalism's most prolific writers." This is a book written by two Christians for a Christian audience. And do you know where the title "Come Let Us Reason" comes from? (Hint: the Bible.) So don't gripe that this book assumes a Christian worldview.

Now, for Christians: Anti-intellectualism is one of Satan's strategies that have made the church ineffective. Geisler's book combined with a good textbook on biblical hermeneutics will enable the Christian to recognize and combat deception and fallacies, and appropriate God's truth.

By reading this book, you'll know what a "straw man fallacy" is. Accusing Geisler with something he didn't say is an example.
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