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Come on Seabiscuit! Paperback – March 1, 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 172 pages
  • Publisher: Bison Books; First Thus edition (March 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0803282877
  • ISBN-13: 978-0803282872
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.4 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #545,448 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"When I was about seven years old. . . . I found a children's book called Come on Seabiscuit! which was just wonderful! I read it so many times I broke the spine and all the pages fell out. I still have it; it has to be wrapped in rubber bands because the pages will go everywhere. But that book in just vivid prose told the story of the horse."—Laura Hillenbrand, July 29, 2003, interview on Fresh Air with Terry Gross
(Laura Hillenbrand)

"Young Adults will love the excitement and the empathy expressed in this story, which is told in language that was held up well for 40 years. Beautiful pencil sketches of the horse and racetrack culture fill the book. This is an inspirational story for those who need to know that one failure does not mean a life of failures and that often critics can be proven wrong."—Kliatt
(Kliatt)

"Written in a folksy, easily understood prose, this illustrated predecessor to Laura Hillenbrand's book about the racehorse (the basis for this summer's movie) is a great pre-movie primer for anyone under 18."—Christy Karras, The Salt Lake Tribune
(Christy Karras Salt Lake Tribune)

"Horse racing fans will enjoy the paperback reprint of Ralph Moody's classic tale Come on Seabiscuit!, originally published in 1963. Seabiscuit, the plucky Depression-era racehorse, has gained a new generation of fans since the 2003 Universal Pictures' film release by the same name, and his fans should enjoy Moody's small, easy-to-read volume with black-and-white illustrations by Robert Riger."—Western Horseman
(Western Horseman)

“One unlikely offshoot of the Seabiscuit phenomenon . . . was a lovely reminder of the way horse-racing writing used to be done: Ralph Moody's Come on Seabiscuit! was recently brought back into print by the University of Nebraska Press. . . . [W]hat is remarkable about the book—and what makes it rewarding even decades after reading it the first time—is the level of detail about the scrawny racehorse. . . . Ultimately, the reason Come on Seabiscuit! and King of the Wind and Black Stallion are so memorable is that they are outstanding children's literature, not just outstanding children's literature about racing. Just as racetrackers never forget the great horses, we never forget the books that left a mark on us. [M]aybe the Seabiscuit effect wouldn't have been possible without books like Come on Seabiscuit!”—Eric Banks, slate.msn.com
(Eric Banks slate.msn.com)

About the Author

Ralph Moody (1898–1982) was a working cowboy from the age of ten, a trick rodeo rider, and a student of good horseflesh. He is the author of Come on Seabiscuit! as well as the Little Britches series about a boy's life on a Colorado ranch, all available in Bison Books editions.

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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I heartily recommend it!!!!!!
SuzyQJH
I recently rediscovered and purchased the book for my own 9-year-old daughter.
Jeremy W. Forstadt
He presents the facts in an easy to read informative style .
Kim

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 28 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 28, 2003
Format: Paperback
Ralph Moody's book is a warm tribute to the story of Seabiscuit. The illustrations are wonderful and it is written at the level for its intended audience. The original tale of Seabiscuit was written by B.K. Beckwith in 1940, his "saga of a great champion"; Moody realized the lessons inherent in this amazing horse--forgotten even by his time in the 1950s--and he recast the tale for a new audience, just the way Laura Hillenbrand did so successfully in our own time. Both Moody and Hillenbrand relied on Beckwith's book and I find the voices of all three to be excellent and complementary. Beckwith actually knew the horse and the people around him, so his book has the excitement of the time, but I recommend all of these books on Seabiscuit.
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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 8, 2003
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The story of Seabiscuit is the story of an underdog who succeeds. Seabiscuit was a grandson of one of the greatest racehorses ever, Man O'War. In spite of Seabiscuit's pedigree, he was not regarded as a promising winner. Misunderstood and overlooked, he was overworked when very young and nearly faded into obscurity.

An unlikely trio saw his potential and raised him to greatness. Charles Howard, a bicycle repairman turned wealthy automobile dealer and thoroughbred owner, purchased the horse. His trainer, Tom Smith, was a former frontiersman, who knew many secrets about training and doctoring horses. Red Pollard, a product of brush-league riding, became Seabiscuit's jockey. With the help of these three men, the outcast horse became a legendary winner on the track.

"Come On Seabiscuit" is written mainly for children, but as others have said, it is a good read for any age. It is an inspirational story about love, trust, friendship, and tapping inner potential in the face of obstacles. Having read this book as a child, I'm thrilled to see it reprinted.

If you like this book, another good one on the same topic is "Seabiscuit: An American Legend" by Laura Hillenbrand. The Hillenbrand book is written for adults, and includes details about the rough realities of the racing world.
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24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 5, 2003
Format: Paperback
With the current fame of Hillenbrand's book, I dug Moody's book out for my young nieces. As good as Hillenbrand's book is, Seabiscuit is somewhat lost in the story of the men around him (Howard, Smith, Pollard, Woolf). Moody's book is shorter and geared to a younger audience. Seabiscuit the horse shines in this story more than Seabiscuit the historical phenomenon. I read once that Moody knew about some of Pollard's secrets, like his vision problem, but he promised to keep the secrets as long as the main players were alive. Moody also emphasizes how good a racehorse Seabiscuit was, how the blood of Man O'War ran through the veins of his grandson even if Seabiscuit didn't look the part. Some of the newer stories talk about Seabiscuit's being lucky to win and being from the wrong side of the track, when he was actually blazingly fast (tied and broke a number of records, including in the match race with War Admiral) and had the bluest of Kentucky blood in his veins.
But put the politics aside and read this wonderful story - like the old saying goes - it doesn't matter who trains them, and it doesn't really matter who rides them, and it certainly doesn't matter who owns them, in the end, a Thoroughbred will run as far and as fast as he was bred to run - and Seabiscuit ran true to his grandsire's heart.....and to his own.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Jeremy W. Forstadt on September 7, 2004
Format: Paperback
When I was 13 years old, I became mad about thoroughbred racing. For three Saturdays in the spring of 1978, I was glued to the television set as Affirmed won the Triple Crown that year. After that exciting series, I pestered my father to take me out to Santa Anita or Hollywood Park whenever I could get away with it, and in my freshman English poetry journal (recently unearthed), 90% of my poems were written about horseracing. I remember going with my father to see Affirmed win the Hollywood Gold Cup in 1979 and so become the first horse in history to win more than $2 million in his lifetime. It was at that race, that I learned about the story of Seabiscuit who had won the inaugural running of The Cup in 1938.

I discovered Ralph Moody's book in the library sometime soon after that memorable race, and I must have read it 20 times for all the events of that horse's life were still ingrained in my memory as I read through Laura Hillenbrand's book many years later. Moody's book focused more on the horse as a character and included details of Seabiscuit's earlier unsuccessful and unhappy career under famed trainer Sunny Jim Fitzsimmons--a part of the history largely ignored by Hillenbrand.

What I remember is a highly compelling, readable, and inspirational book: Seabiscuit and Affirmed became my leading sports heroes during that era. COME ON SEABISCUIT, though written for the older child or young adult, is a very readable book for adults as well, and due to its complementary history, would be an excellent companion volume to those who have discovered Seabiscuit through Laura Hillenbrand. I recently rediscovered and purchased the book for my own 9-year-old daughter. I am happy to see that this extraordinary book is now enjoying a resurgent and well-deserved popularity after all these years.

Jeremy W. Forstadt
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