Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.95
  • Save: $1.75 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: **Withdrawn Library Copy in very good condition, minimal use. Does have the customary library label/stamps. Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed! Tracking number provided in your Amazon account with every order.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Comics Gone Ape! Paperback – April 18, 2007


Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.20
$4.75 $0.87

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Bone Clocks" by David Mitchell.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: TwoMorrows Publishing (April 18, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1893905624
  • ISBN-13: 978-1893905627
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 8.5 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,065,425 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

DC Comics editor Julius Schwartz, who was largely responsible for the early-1960s revival of the superhero genre, steadfastly believed that a gorilla on the cover guaranteed greater sales. He must not have been the only one who thought so, for as Eury proves, there have been enough monkeyshines on and within comic-book covers over the decades to fill a book. In the 1930s, comics followed Hollywood's lead and portrayed the exploits of Tarzan and dozens of imitation jungle kings. The 1960s were overrun with Kong-inspired giant apes, from Konga to Superman's simian foe, Titano, whose eyes emitted Kryptonite rays. Heroes and villains whose minds were transferred into apes' bodies get a chapter from Eury, as does a 1970s spinoff of the Planet of the Apes movies. Eury's impressively broad examination of the subject encompasses everything from cheesy 1950s horror comics to alternative-comics artist Tony Millionaire's Sock Monkey. With campily delightful artwork on every page, interviews with comics creators about their monkey-oriented work, and Eury's wry commentary, the book deserves an ape-preciative audience. Flagg, Gordon

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By N. Franklin on May 30, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Be still my heart! I love this book! If you love comics and monkeys and comics about monkeys, this is the book you've been waiting for. In a perfect world it would be in color, have twice as many pages, and include an index and bibliography (in which case it would deserve TEN stars, but also cost about $100)... but I'm not complaining; as far as I can tell this is the only book about monkey comics in existence. It is quite comprehensive, covering pretty much every monkey comic you can think of, packed with lots of great pictures, and I'm very happy to have it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bret Curry on July 3, 2007
Format: Paperback
Eury does an almost perfect job with this. The book looks at the apes in the comics in chapters grouped by theme: Tarzan/jungle men, Kong/giant apes, humorous chimps, human apes etc. Each chapter contains a 3-4 page overview of the theme, a cover gallery (great), short write-ups on specific examples of theme (eg Konga, Titano, Detective Chimp) and interviews with artists/writers who worked on these characters (including Infantino, Arthur Adams, Tony Millionaire).

Eury maintains the right tone throughout - light but not mocking. This book is tremendous fun.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Pops Gustav on August 3, 2007
Format: Paperback
The idea of a full book about primates in comics seems silly at first, but upon reading... okay, it's still silly, but it's as entertaining and often hilarious as hell, especially if you're a fanboy with an affinity for the great comics of the Silver and Bronze eras.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images