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Coming of Age in Mississippi by Anne Moody Mass Market Paperback – July 12, 2009


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Mass Market Paperback, July 12, 2009
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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback
  • Publisher: by Anne Moody (July 12, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007ZUUOC2
  • Product Dimensions: 6.7 x 3.9 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #197,901 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Although the author and I are both black, the same age; and both grew up poor in the profoundly racist rural south, and share many experiences, there also are enough differences in our respective experiences to make up another world, and to make this book an uneasy read for me.

Rather than waste a lot of time trying to parse and explain these differences, may I suggest the excellent book by Nicklaus Lehmann, called "The Promise Land." It basically is an ethnographic study of what happens to kids from two black families that migrated to Chicago after WW-II; one family with a background more similar to Anne Moody's (the author of this book); and the other more similar to the Silas Brown family of which I was a part.

Intra-color black differences and gender issues aside, Lehmann has captured the differences between the progenies of the respective families about as accurately and as subtly as can be done by a scholar -- no matter the color. "The Promise Land," summarizes better than I ever could, the core differences between "coming of age in Arkansas in an independent landowning poor black family," and "coming of age in a poor Mississippi share-cropping black family."

One of the main differences is that being a landowner appears to put the poor black family more firmly in control of their own destiny. This difference is real, conceptual, moral and a survival necessity. For instance, as poor as we were, we never once went hungry, because we alway grew our own food, even the kids had their own gardens and fruit trees. In fact we only went into the nearest town, Lonoke, Arkansas, a few times a year, mostly to get "Light Bread" and "Corn Flakes," both considered luxury items.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Akanimo on September 11, 2013
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Was a little delay but i got it eventually and it was all i looking for. It was good literature as well as satisfied the requirment for the class i was taking
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