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62 of 65 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars NEW BATTLE PLANS - THINK FAST COMMANDER!
I generally do not like expansions. They used to be additions only very successful games got to have. Nowadays they are mostly the...other half of the game the publisher withheld when selling us half the original for $50! C&C:KANE's WRATH is a rare exception that brings new dimensions to an already great game!

Story-wise, although an expansion, this is somewhat...
Published on March 24, 2008 by NeuroSplicer

versus
17 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Needs some patches most likely
I give this expansion pack 5 stars for story line, new technology units and overall fun. I give it 1 to 2 stars for technical quality. I have a Nvidia GeForce FX 5200 video card in the system I play Kane's Wrath on. I can play the game from 5 to 20 minutes at a stretch. It then crashes with a debug that ALWAYS references to the video or some type of graphic rendering...
Published on March 31, 2008 by Don't tread on me


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62 of 65 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars NEW BATTLE PLANS - THINK FAST COMMANDER!, March 24, 2008
By 
NeuroSplicer (Freeside, in geosynchronous orbit) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Command & Conquer 3: Kane's Wrath - PC (Video Game)
I generally do not like expansions. They used to be additions only very successful games got to have. Nowadays they are mostly the...other half of the game the publisher withheld when selling us half the original for $50! C&C:KANE's WRATH is a rare exception that brings new dimensions to an already great game!

Story-wise, although an expansion, this is somewhat of a prequel to C&C3-TIBERIUM WARS, as it is set on the history of NOD, starting off just after the 2nd Tiberium War and continuing well past the 3rd.
There is a big campaign comprising of 13 single player missions, new units and upgrades and a new (a la RISE OF NATIONS) Global Conquest mode, that can turn C&C3 into a Turn-Based game! What make this REALLY interesting are the six subfactions, each with its special units, strengths and weaknesses. Not to worry, all GDI, NOD and Scrin get their own off-shooting factions.
On the opposite ends of the spectrum, there is Reaper-17 (a Scrin sub-faction): with hard-hitting and powerful offensive options; and then there is Traveler-59 (also a Scrin offshoot): a much more devious faction that relies on mind control of humans (remember how much fun Yuri's Revenge? was). In between, GDI's (retro) Steel Talons and (futuristic) ZoCom and NOD's (mind-benders) Black Hand and (cyborgs galore) Mark of Kane.

Production of the new epic-units can tip the battlefield scales dramatically. Most are not only devastating but are pretty hard to take down too. GDI gets the MARV [Mammoth Armed Reclamation Vehicle], a souped-up triple-barreled tank; NOD gets the Redeemer, an augmented killer avatar; whereas, Scrin get the Eradicator Hexapod, a impressive six-legged mech.
Revamped units, such as the Shard Walker or the Reaper Tripod, or back-to-the-drawing-board units, such as the Prodigy or the Ravager all add to a renewed experience. Moreover, as a long-time C&C fan, I particularly enjoyed the reappearance of good-ol' units such as Titans and Wolverines on the side of GDI!

The graphics are beautiful, the physics detailed and the explosions and beam-weapons spectacular! Don't forget to turn on the volume on those speakers, because this is a total immersion experience.

As with the original: it misses the 5th star for fun because one cannot hold a battle formation while moving. As most units move at different paces (and although the AI has improved they keep bumping on each other), this results in the more agile, yet vulnerable, units having to face the enemy first - a short-lived sight... May be the next C&C (say, RED ALERT 3) could have some TOTAL WAR infused into it, with battle formations options.

If you are boycotting SecuROM you should know that it is the copy-protection used (nevertheless, it is the usual version used in the original C&C3-TW as well, coming nowhere near the BIOSHOCK RootKit madness!). I usually withhold at least one rating star because of such security inconveniences. However, I enjoyed the game so much that I was willing to overlook it. On the other hand, since it is important for a great number of Amazon customers, I have to mention it for the sake of a well informed decision.

Finally, be advised that this is an expansion and, yes, you do need the original C&C3: TIBERIUM WARS to play it. If you do not have it, take note that there is a pack available, including both original game and expansion (the prices fluctuate so make sure to get the best deal).

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!!!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Easily the best C&C title in series history !, April 21, 2011
By 
G. Serpen (Istanbul, Turkey) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Command & Conquer 3: Kane's Wrath - PC (Video Game)
Even though I had owned C&C3 Tiberium Wars for quite some time, I had ignored this expansion as I really didn't want to spend any money just to get a few additional units and I never really liked epic (or hero) units in RTS games. It was not until I watched VODs and commentaries of some of Kane's Wrath top level games that I realized this was a totally different game than vanilla C&C3.

You should be aware of 4 major changes to Kane's Wrath economy :

1) Refinery cost has been increased from 2000 to 3000 credits.
2) Harvester health for Scrin and GDI factions have been reduced 50% (NOD harvesters were weak to begin with).
3) Capturing tiberium spikes now earns you 10 credits per second rather than 25.
4) Base expansion by crawling your base to the next closest tiberium field is no longer possible.

All changes made to existing units and the addition of new units to the game are really secondary to the changes in the economy as the flow of the game has changed dramatically. C&C3 TW was about eco-boom. Refineries were cheap, it was easy to expand. If you memorized an effective build order for each map you could outspam your opponent and create massive armies. Army composition mattered if 2 opponents of equal skill faced each other off but with so much money flow it was possible to create an army with anti-tank, anti-infantry and anti-air without scouting what your opponent had and you could win if numbers favored you. In other words, TW was a homage to classic C&C.

Kane's Wrath is less forgiving. The game flow is similar to Starcraft in the sense that the early to mid-game is usually focused on harvester harassment. Protecting your harvesters is critical as you are usually on a tighter budget and you won't be able to spam refineries and harvesters. It is tougher to recover from an economic setback. You have to put more thought towards the timing of your expansion and timing of your teching as both put you in a vulnerable position. Because your economy won't support as many production queues as TW did, scouting is crucial in order to gain enough time to set your counters up.

TW may be considered an action-RTS, KW on other hand is more competetive and suited to e-sports. Don't let that scare you, TW still requires more actions per minute because you are handling larger armies and you are building structures and training units constantly from a greater number of production queues. KW requires you to put more thought into what you are building and prioritize certain production queues or upgrades because the number of harvesters you have usually won't support them all simultaneously. KW tempo is slower than TW although the first 7-8 minutes are still faster than Starcraft 2 (because you start the game with money as opposed to harvesters) so it is no slouch.

Faction diversity in KW has increased. Each faction now has a hard hitting steamrolling sub-faction and a tactical finesse sub-faction. The downside is that the original factions have most of their weaknesses covered and they've become jack-of-all trades factions. For example GDI did not have good anti-air in TW, now they've got tungsten shell upgrades, slingshots and hammerhead helicopters garrisoned with rocket troops that never need to return to an airfield to reload. NOD has great artillery (spectres) now. The Scrin (and T-59 sub-faction) are still hardest to play because their weak Tier 1 (no tanks, no ranged infantry) has not been strengthened. The addition of the mechapede unit to all Scrin factions is useful but their Tier 3 was already very strong. Unfortunately with 9 factions and only 2 patches the game is far from balanced. Vanilla GDI and Black Hand are the stongest factions in the game. However if you approach the game with the intent of having fun rather than competition it really doesn't matter, there are no huge imbalances.

So you may be asking yourself why should you play this game when it's online community has dwindled to the point where you can only find games at weekends during peak hours whereas with Starcraft 2 you can find a game anytime ? Well, as most of you know, SC2 does not support LAN gaming so if you don't have the bandwidth for a 3v3 game with your friends, Kane's Wrath might be a better choice. KW is also a better choice for casual RTS gamers. The game has good depth but simpler macro mechanics than SC2 and the learning curve is not as steep. The micro mechanics are of similar difficulty to SC2 but a little more interesting (units can shoot while moving, garrisonable structures, tanks may reverse move) so it feels less static. KW maps are less campy as the maps are usually open (no elevated bases with single ramp) so turtling is harder but it is still a viable strategy, especially with NOD defenses. KW encourages heavy turtling only AFTER you set up your expansions because a single tiberium field won't support you for long. If you are used to walling off as Terran in Starcraft you may find KW difficult at first, but many urban maps (not used in official ranked ladder games) have clear choke points which may make the transition easier.

I would not suggest you buy this game if you only play campaign mode. Campaigns are scripted therefore you won't notice the major differences between TW and KW with linear, objective-based gameplay. If you play against skirmish AI, TW is more challenging because the faster pace and larger armies favor the computer. TW "rusher" or "guerilla" AI will easily launch attacks on you on 3 fronts so TW skirmish may feel more overwhelming. The slower pace in KW makes it easier to take advantage of the AI's weaknesses (harvester defense, unescorted engineers, expanding using vulnerable expansion vehicles only, love of superweapons) even though both games' AI share the same weaknesses within their core tactical logic. On the positive side, both games have multiple alternative build orders per AI personality so even though "turtle", "steamroller" and "balanced" personalities are easier to skirmish against, you may want to set the AI personality to "random" so you may practice scouting and map awareness.

After the C&C4 debacle it is possible that EA pulls the plug on the series. As such, this game deserves a spot in your library as the best C&C game in the long history of the series. Many may consider Red Alert 2 as the best, but that is because they grew up with that game. KW will age better over time. I still feel SC2 is the best RTS out there because it is the only game where all factions have completely different economies but KW is a very close contender to the crown!
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17 of 22 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Needs some patches most likely, March 31, 2008
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Command & Conquer 3: Kane's Wrath - PC (Video Game)
I give this expansion pack 5 stars for story line, new technology units and overall fun. I give it 1 to 2 stars for technical quality. I have a Nvidia GeForce FX 5200 video card in the system I play Kane's Wrath on. I can play the game from 5 to 20 minutes at a stretch. It then crashes with a debug that ALWAYS references to the video or some type of graphic rendering. I downloaded a new driver from Nvidia that did help space out the crashes. My DirectX version and settings match up to what EA is suggesting to resolve the issue. As I said, all of this helps, but I am still getting A LOT of video related game crashes.

Your video card may not have a single problem with this game. I only wanted to post this review to offer my own experience. I am definitely NOT sorry that I bought this game despite the crashes. I hope to purchase a new computer (my system is a bit aged) someday which will run this game with no crashes. Until then, I will play it for what I can, hope for some patches from EA and just hold on to it in my library until that new computer graces my home desk.....
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Kane is back and he is ticked off., April 8, 2008
By 
Gareth Mc Bride (Lynnwood, WA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Command & Conquer 3: Kane's Wrath - PC (Video Game)
I am a big fan of the Command and Conquer series and was thrilled when the series returned to form with the release of Command and Conquer 3. The previous release in the series, Generals, did not work for me, as I missed the GDI and Nod conflict as well as the full motion video that had been staples of the franchise from the start.

Thankfully the series not only returned to form, but took the series in a bold new direction by combining all of the classic elements of the series with the latest in 3D graphics and an dynamic story told from the point of three factions including the brand new alien Scrin faction.

With the success of Command and Conquer 3 and the pending release of Red Alert 3, E.A. decided to release a new expansion to the game, Kane's Wrath which provides a brand new story arch for the Nod side as well as a host of improvements for multiplay.

The story spans more than twenty years and places players in the role of Legion, a minion of the enigmatic cult leader Kane who is placed in command of the armies. The missions are introduced by the use of full motion video sequences as well as in game messages that appear in the command bar.

With the story spanning the end of the second Tiberium War as well as the third war and beyond, the game cleverly gives players new missions, as well as expands on the back-story of some of the missions from the last game.

As is typical for the series, players must collect Tiberium and harvest it into currency in order to buy more structures and units to build and defend a base as well as an army to carry out the assigned missions. With a multitude of units available, players will have many options to choose from ranging from vehicles, planes, ground troops, specialty units, and the really big weapons which show up later in the game.

The campaigns are enjoyable and do offer some challenges even when played on some of the lower difficulty settings.

The inclusion of new units is always a selling point of any expansion pack in the series and Kane's Wrath is no exception. As well as new ground units, there is a new transport vehicle and a super unit called the Redeemer which has to be seen to be believed. This is not overkill, as the forces pitted against you have their own new super units and it will take skill to complete the missions as raw firepower alone will not do it.

One issue I had with the game that was a source of frustration was the fact that several times, despite clearing every enemy on the map, I was tasked with protecting/escorting a unit after reaching a specific point in the mission. Usually this is not a problem, but time and again, enemy units would appear out of nowhere before I could scramble or manufacture units to counter attack or defend.

I had to resolve this issue by returning to an earlier saved game and staging the area with appropriate defenses in anticipation of what was to come. While it does hamper with the flow of the game I was able to complete the missions but it was a pain having to prepare for what you know is coming instead of being able to react accordingly as threats arose.

The missions as stated are enjoyable and the final mission was a real challenge though it did not start out that way. It took some careful strategy and a few attempts before I was able to complete the task, but after doing so, I was happy to have my strategy pay off.

I would have liked to have seen more missions with the Scrin as they show up briefly in the game but I am sure fans of not seen the last of them.

The acting in the game is solid and it was nice to see Natasha Henstridge of the "Species" films as well as Carl Lumbly of Alias join the series as they really added well to the story as does the always good Joe Kucan who plays Kane.

Graphically the game shines as the 3D graphics and the ability to zoom in on a unit is almost as much fun as watching the tracks and damage units create on the landscapes as they travel.

The only real issue I had with the game other than the escort problem I mentioned above was path finding as units still got jammed up. More than a few times I had to remove one of my own buildings so harvesters would not spin in place and would take their precious cargo to my refinery so I could have the ever important funds to press on the fight.

Multiplay also shines in the game as players match up via the online service in the game and as a bonus, can now play some of the rogue factions in the game. Aside from playing Scrin, Nod, or G.D.I. options such as Steel Talons and various rogue factions are playable online.

In all, despite some glitches the game shines and continues the great legacy of Command and Conquer in style.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Full of surprises, a must have, April 12, 2008
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Command & Conquer 3: Kane's Wrath - PC (Video Game)
This expansion of Command and Conquer 3 it a whole new game on it self. The new global domination game style reminds me of a variation of RISK; where all three factions (GDI, NOD, and Scrin) battle it out for world domination. The single player missions are also quite enjoyable, taking you back to the end of the 2nd Tiberium war and having change to play with some great units of the past. All in all a must have for the collection, and definitely not just an expansion.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Command and Conquer meets Total War in a new Global Conquest mode, March 17, 2013
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Command & Conquer 3: Kane's Wrath - PC (Video Game)
This game can be split into three sections, Single Player, Multiplayer and Global Conquest.
Single Player was a continuation of Command and Conquer 3, meaning if you liked that, you'll like this single player campaign. As usual for Command and Conquer, there are full motion videos between missions, varied objectives, and a coherent storyline to tie the whole thing together. Also, as in the best Command and Conquer games, there are a few things that shake up the very concept of direct RTS control. For example, without spoiling anything, at one part of the game you are about to do something on the battle map, when suddenly a character from the FMV cutscenes steps in, and without the mission even being over, triggers a cutscene that prevents you from doing what was previously your mission objective. That's the kind of cool stuff that the best RTS games in general are made of.

I should mention that the maps you play on could be described as "beautiful desolation". They are beautiful because the engine the game uses allows detail beyond what Command and Conquer Generals was capable of, and it's obvious the game's artists took their time to carefully construct the terrain and features in it. The game world you fight in is also a desolate, somewhat sad and depressing place to fight in. Tiberium and constant war, as the game's trailer makes clear, has made large parts of the world uninhabitable. Yellow zone maps make this most obvious, with crumbling, dilapidated structures dotting what used to be thriving cities, and red zone maps no longer look like Earth, without a blade of grass surviving there. Even the blue zone cities, which look clean and futuristic, are a bit depressing in that the map design necessitates there being Tiberium deposits there too. Also of note, as opposed to the maps of, say, Command and Conquer: Red Alert 2, which are populated by people and animals caught up in the conflict, there is not a single civilian or animal appearing in the entire game, which makes it seem like the entire Earth is dead aside from the sides that are fighting, even in missions where by all measures it should be crowded with civilians, like the first Rio de Janeiro level. Basically, it's a fun world to play in, but it would be an extremely depressing place to live in.

Anyway, besides that, there were only two complaints I had about the single player campaign. First, the game stretches between a long period of time, and at one point Kane even mentions to you "In the time you have been sleeping, our technology has advanced 10 fold." And yet, while as usual you get more units unlocked as you progress, there really is no change in the units and technology for the entire game. Whether you're playing the first level or the last one, laser turrets look the same, militia carry the same weapons, and buildings look exactly the same. In such a dynamically changing world as this, I would have thought there would be a visual and technological change between the time periods. At the very least, I wished that the few missions taking place right after the Second Tiberium War would have a few Tick Tanks and Banshees around, especially since the game brought back Titans and Wolverines for those levels. Second, the main reason I even bought Command and Conquer 3: Kane's Wrath is because Command and Conquer 3 ended on two massive cliffhangers, one for the NOD campaign and one for the Scrin one. This game barely explains the NOD cliffhanger, and doesn't touch on the Scrin cliffhanger at all, and again ends on a massive cliffhanger. Maybe EA wants me to play Command and Conquer 4 to see the resolution of THAT cliffhanger, but it was sort of annoying not to have the game end at least a bit tidily, like most of the rest of the Command and Conquer games did.

Multiplayer doesn't bear much mentioning. This game came out in 2008, and I'm playing it in 2013. Right at this moment, only one lobby of Multiplayer has more than three people in it, and that lobby, the default "Casual 1", has anywhere between 4 and 20 people in it at a given time. Point being, the time for the game's Multiplayer seems to have passed. I could find a game, but only after 5-10 minutes of either waiting to find one to join, or forming my own game and waiting. The Multiplayer itself will be familiar to anyone who has played Command and Conquer generals. There is a leveling system to show who has played the game more, and you go into matches, pick your spot, your faction, color, and team, and once everyone is ready, the game can start. Of note, one of the things I really liked about this was a speed counter which let you set the speed on slower than normal, but not faster than normal. I'm a fan of games like StarCraft and Age of Empires as well, but what annoys me most about their Multiplayer sections is the infernal drive to do everything super-fast. It's nice to have a RTS game that doesn't have a bunch of Multiplayer game speeds to learn, and has rather quick, mostly small games, but not so quick that you need to learn every shortcut to be competitive.

Last but certainly not least is the Global Conquest mode. Now, at first I thought this was just a tagged-on bloatware feature so EA can put a little bullet point saying "Fight the Third Tiberium War your way. Position your forces on a strategic level and then wage conflict in fast, fluid, furious, tactical gameplay. Map out your strategies on the planetary level and wage all-out war on the ground." It's not. The developers put time and effort into this game mode to make a mode that's simple to learn, but nuanced to thrive on. You are given a tutorial and a game manual that gives you the very basics, but most of the tricks you have to learn by trial and error. Not knowing it was impossible, one of the first things I tried to do was capture a GDI base as NOD in my first game, thinking that would grant me more units then I started with, until I realized that did nothing and units captured or mind-controlled in the tactical map do not carry over to the strategic map.
In the same vein as the Total War series or Age of Wonders series, there is a strategic map where you can build units and a tactical map where you can have those units fight, and both modes influence each other. However, this has several unique features. First, each of the factions has its own victory condition, such that you can control half of the world and still win or lose, encouraging you to be aggressive, or at the very least, defend your possessions fiercely if you are close to winning. Second, the backdrop is a world covered in Tiberium, and like so much ripe corn, each base can harvest that Tiberium around it for a large amount of resources, but once it's all harvested, that resource number drops down to a small baseline level. This encourages mobility, especially for the Scrin, who rather than constantly generating resources from cities forever, generate a fixed amount of resources from cities until they become leveled husks, useless for anyone but GDI, who can re-populate those husks. Third, you have the option of equipping each strike force with a base constructing unit, meaning there are really three types of strike forces - pure base construction, annihilation forces, and build, hold, destroy forces. Pure base construction is just a base construction unit to be sent out from your other bases to make a new base without the expense of paying for defending units. Annihilation forces have no base constructing unit, and thus they must attack the other force quickly, especially if it's a base or has a BCU or else it will be quickly overwhelmed as soon as the enemy has harvested enough Tiberium to counterstrike. And most interesting is what I would term a Build, Hold, Destroy force, or BHD force. This is a force that has a BCU and one or more other units. If it comes in contact with an annihilation force, it won't have time to product much more than basic infantry, but if attacking a base or another BHD force, it can build a base, hold back the enemy, and eventually get the power to overwhelm and destroy the enemy. One idiosyncrasy of the game is that it can actually replenish every starting unit. You see, the way the game is designed, you can never end a match with more units than you began it. But, if you, say, start the match with 5 disintegrator units, and all those die in the first minute, all you need to do is make sure that by the end of the game you build at least 5 disintegrator units, and it'll be like they never died. Thus, it's possible that in an even match between two BHD forces, which the Tactical AI (the quick auto-resolve for when you don't want to play a 5-60 minute match to determine the outcome of an interaction) would say left your force victorious but in shambles, could actually end without a single unit destroyed if you leave one enemy unit and take the time to re-build all the units you started the match with.

The end result is a varied and interesting game mode. One of the most annoying things about Multiplayer is that while your opponent can be clever, you start every match in the exact same position as the one before it. Meanwhile, Single Player matches are varied and asymmetrical, but limited to just those scenarios designed by the game's designers. Global Conquest takes the best of both worlds. The global conflict is the backdrop to fighting matches against the AI, but unless you have two pure base construction units meet each other, which pretty much never happens, every single match is asymmetrical. For example, in one match, I had a small Tier 1 base, beset by 10 Mammoth tanks. Tactical AI would have said I was doomed, but I pumped out wave after wave of Disintegrators (which explode when crushed as well as fire on the enemy) and pretty soon those 10 Mammoth tanks became 10 heaps of scraps, saving the base. Similarly, in one seemingly one-sided game, where my Tier 3 base was matched against a small BHD force, I got impatient and tried attacking it with air power early on, blowing my opening Tiberium. Those units where shot out of the sky without destroying the Nod construction yard, and the AI built, held its ground, and destroyed me. In another game, a large annihilation force with a Redeemer unit walked into my base, blew up a few ground units, and just stood there. The match AI personality is random, and this one was on Steamroller despite it being an annihilation force, and it stood around my base, not destroying any buildings, but killing any ground units I made. So, I built four stormriders, killed the four rocket troopers defending the large ground force, and then used the stormriders to destroy the remaining force, which was exclusively anti-ground. In such a case, even the rare game glitch can turn a hopeless situation into a victory.

But whether each match is a cakewalk or hopeless Hail Mary isn't just determined by starting forces, and the randomly-assigned five AI personalities. EA really put time into the AI. To break it down, there are four AI settings - Easy, Normal, Hard, and Brutal AI, which determine your level of resistance in both the global conflict and the tactical matches. Easy mode made it nearly impossible to lose. Normal was a bit of a challenge, but winning was still a foregone conclusion. Brutal goes the opposite direction, making the AI out-maneuver you on the global scale, and making it nearly impossible to win matches against it. Hard, at least for me, was the real stand-out of this whole game mode.

On Hard, the AI is clever, but not unmanageably so. I think the best example of this was one game I was playing against it that was about evenly matched, but I had the advantage. Then, around halfway through the match, the enemy sent an Engineer to capture my Explorer unit. Without anything nearby to re-capture it or destroy it, it quickly built a refinery and a barracks, captured my Extractor, and started a shoving match for the only untapped source of Tiberium on the map. A sure victory became a near-defeat, but I scraped by, and actually won the game because after all deposits were exhausted, I had a little more Tiberium than the enemy, and built a few units to destroy its remaining base. The other AI settings I tried only once, but on Hard, I played three Global Conquest games, losing the first two and winning the third. I found myself lying up at night, thinking, strategizing about what kind of actions I should take when playing the game that would make victory most likely, and how I should counter the kinds of things the enemy might do. It was pretty much the most fun I've ever had with insomnia.

So, to sum everything up, single player was same as Command and Conquer 3 - interesting, varied, and set in a fun but strangely depressing world. It also ends on just as much a cliffhanger as the Command and Conquer 3, and doesn't really have any NOD unit differences based on the time periods its set in. Multiplayer is almost a ghost town as of 2013, and probably in a year or two more you won't find a single soul to play with if you wait a half hour. And Global Conquest is the standout of this game, combining the asymmetrical warfare of single player with the limitless content of multiplayer, allowing you to play small matches that matter in a larger game. Further, it has an AI that's as clever as you want it to be to get the sort of balance skill and challenge that Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi termed as "flow". So, this is the sort of expansion that you can skip if you want your questions from Command and Conquer 3 answered, or want to play against a large population of players in Multiplayer, but you won't be deprived of entertainment if you like Command and Conquer single player campaigns, or like duel-level games like Total War and Age of Wonders.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best RTS Game, July 16, 2009
= Fun:5.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Command & Conquer 3: Kane's Wrath - PC (Video Game)
By the time I purchased C&C3 I was totally addicted to C&CGeneralsZeroHour and I could not get use to new Tiberium Wars. However, time passed, Kane's Wrath expansion appeared and now I enjoy it very much.For me, it is not a perfect, but defintely the best RTS game I ever played.

AI is almost completaly predictable and playing constantly against computer quickly becomes boring. In skirmish mode, AI attacks with large number of mixed units usually without using any tactics (for example: pushing some 20 helicopters against anti-air defenses)depleting all resources.
On the other hand, online play is fun and often really challanging.In order to win 1vs1, player needs to be quick and have his eyes in every corner of the map (it means expanding base,detecting opponent's tactics and rushing squads - all at the same time). It requires skill.

Pros:
1. Well developed system of commands and controls. It allows player to implement tactics quickly.
2. Variety of avaliable units. There is plenty of different units with different abilities that gives player possibility of surprise attacks
3. Interesting economy. Player needs to gather "Tiberium" from the fields that may be depleted but gradually grows back again after time.
4. Very good graphics.
5. Variety of maps.In addition, many fascinating, unofficial maps are avaliable online.
6. Game runs very well. I never had a single crash.
7. Factions are relatively well balanced.
8. Global Conquest is a nice addition. However, comparing to other turn-based strategies (for example MedievalIITotalWar) in my opinion this part is underdeveloped.
9. Interesing story.

Cons:
1. Sometimes units fail to respond to order (for example Harvester running around like a retard and unable to provide income or MARV, blocked by some other units unable to move) It certainly needs a fix.

What I would like to see about C&C game is more advanced camera rotation. Possibility of observing army and base from every perspective (like in WorldinConflict)could be great addition to already great game. I just hope that recently announced C&C4 will have this type of improvement.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Decent Expansion, July 4, 2008
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Command & Conquer 3: Kane's Wrath - PC (Video Game)
C&C 3: Kane's Wrath is an expansion for the excellent C&C 3: Tiberium Wars. Those that liked the core game will most likely enjoy this one, as will people that are fans of the series and have followed it from its inception. In general, Kane's Wrath is very standard expansion fare- nothing that will blow you away or change your mind about the game if you didn't like it before, but enough to satisfy anyone that did.

The expansion adds three major components to the game: a new Nod campaign, global conquest mode, and new sub-factions and units. The campaign is difficult in comparison to the original game, but not overly challenging if you're a C&C veteran. It's also not particularly long, but is well done with the traditional FMV cutscenes and cheesy acting. As you might have gathered from the title, Kane is back in all his insidious glory. Joining the cast are Natasha Henstridge and Carl Lumbly as Nod sub-commanders. You don't play as GDI or Scrin, but do get a chance to play all of the Nod sub-factions and also fight each of the other side's sub-factions. The plot is a bit of a departure from previous C&C outings. It is actually a back-story that spans from Tiberian Sun to the end of Tiberium Wars, and is obviously a lead-in toward some future game or expansion. We'll see which eventually, I'm sure...

The expansion adds two new sub-factions for each of the sides, and these behave somewhat similarly to the generals in C&C Generals: Zero Hour, or to the sub-factions in Emperor: Battle for Dune. Specifically, they grant you the ability to make unique units, some of which take the place of regular units. You may also get new powers and upgrades. Some sub-factions also lack the ability to purchase core units or upgrades, as a balancing factor. Additionally, GDI, Nod, and the Scrin each have a new 'epic' unit: the MARV, Redeemer, and Eradicator Hexapod, respectively. These units are similar to the Mammoth Mk 3 or Cyborg Commando in Tiberian Sun, in that only one can be on the field at the time. They both require a unique structure to build (which can also serve as a standard war factory) and cost a lot of money. However, they can single-handedly slaughter pretty much anything short of an entire army, and are simply cool to look at.

Global conquest mode is very similar to the War of the Ring mode in Lord of the Rings: Battle for Middle Earth 2 (with the expansion). You can build bases across a world map, upgrade them to make them tougher and able to produce better units, and build strike forces (essentially, armies) to attack other factions' bases. In strategic map mode, the game is turn-based, and you can either fight battles in real-time or auto-resolve them in a manner similar to the Total War series. Each side has different victory objectives, or can win simply by wiping out the others. For example, GDI can achieve victory by claiming a certain percentage of the map within the zone of control of its bases. This is a nice touch that adds replay value to the game. It's got a bit more depth to it than the usual skirmish, and- while not exactly groundbreaking in any way- is new for the C&C series.

I only have a few complaints with Kane's Wrath, first and foremost the fact that many of the sub-factions look really weak to me. This can and likely will be fixed in balance patches, however, so it's not a major concern. Secondly, I'd have liked at least some of the campaign to showcase the story of the GDI and Scrin sub-factions. It's kind of weird to just suddenly see all these new toys everyone is using, when we finished grinding through three large campaigns in the original game without hearing a peep of them. I can kind of understand why the expansion focuses solely on Nod, but it would have been nice to have a few unlockable extra GDI/Scrin levels.

The bottom line is that if you liked C&C 3 or any of its predecessors, you will likely enjoy this expansion. If you didn't, then you should probably give this one a pass. It doesn't do much to break the mold of the game, but this is likely by design. Personally, speaking as someone that's played C&C since the original on DOS (remember, back in the stone age when we thought that was so cool?) I still haven't tired of this time-tested RTS hallmark. So far, more of the same hasn't quite worn me out.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very Entertaining Expansion, September 15, 2008
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Command & Conquer 3: Kane's Wrath - PC (Video Game)
Though this may be a spoiler it's rather an explanation - the campaign is told entirely from Nod's point of view. It details behind the scenes events and leads up to another sequel at the end.

Is it fun? Yes. Is it oh-my-god-this-is-amazing? Not really. The campaign, depending upon difficulty versus skill level with RTS games, can range from incredibly easy to moderately tough.

Onto the more important information - game play. Overall, the six factions are balanced rather well for it accommodates several play styles for each of the three major factions - fast attack rush tactics, expensive and incredibly durable steamrollers and a middle ground behind the main factions of GDI, Nod, and Scrin.

I've played each faction and each has its ups and downs that can if the player doesn't fully understand each faction's favored play style, may end up being the nail in his coffin. I suggest playing skirmish before trying online play.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good but left you wanting more, May 30, 2008
= Fun:4.0 out of 5 stars 
This review is from: Command & Conquer 3: Kane's Wrath - PC (Video Game)
The actual expansion works fine except one level that's a little buggy namely tacitus interuptus which has some problems giving credits for objectives. Aside from that the game is a nice change of pace since it goes through the tiberium wars 2-3. The only main annoyance i had was that it only had the nod campaign to test out the new units and specials so you have to test GDI and Scrin in skirmish / multiplayer. If your only buying for multiplayer or are considering getting it in the future now is the time because the game comes with a beta key for red alert 3 which looks very good.
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Command & Conquer 3: Kane's Wrath - PC
Command & Conquer 3: Kane's Wrath - PC by Electronic Arts (Windows 2000 / 98 / XP)
$19.99 $8.85
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