Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.95
  • Save: $3.99 (20%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Details
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Command of the Waters: Ir... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Like New | Details
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Book in almost Brand New condition. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers. Your purchase benefits world literacy!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Command of the Waters: Iron Triangles, Federal Water Development, and Indian Water Paperback – September 1, 1994


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.96
$2.97 $0.08

The Oregon Trail: A New American Journey
At once a majestic journey across the West, a significant work of history, and a moving personal saga, The Oregon Trail draws readers into the journey of a lifetime. Learn more
$15.96 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Temporarily out of stock. Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Editorial Reviews

Review

Will surely remain the best treatment of this important subject for some time to come." —Western Historical Quarterly "Provides a clear and concise understanding of how water policy has been made in this century." —Water Resources Bulletin "[A ] consistently high level of scholarship and careful application of contemporary public policy concepts to a significant public question." —Choice "The juxtaposition of non-Indian and Indian water rights and projects is a special strength of the book, contrasting vividly the political power of the non-Indian water iron triangle with its necessary opposite, the powerlessness of the Indians." —Policy Studies Journal "Will be particularly useful to readers looking into this complicated subject for the first time." —Public Historian "Exceptionally insightful, remarkably well written, and full of both excellent conceptualization and rich detail." —American Political Science Review

About the Author

Daniel McCool is Professor of Political Science and Director of the American West Center at the University of Utah.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details


More About the Author

When I was growing up in central Indiana, rivers and creeks were the only "wild" places where we could enjoy a taste of nature. My earliest adventures took place on nearby watercourses. When I moved to the American West, the rivers took on an even larger meaning; they not only provided astounding opportunities for recreation and adventure, they were also rare and usually severely compromised by over-development. So, rivers have played an important role in my life since I was a small boy; the same can be said for my son.

I went to grad school in Arizona, where encountering a river or creek is such a rarity in the desert that it is a special kind of prize, like finding a jewel in the sand. I moved to Utah 25 years ago, and discovered a land or unsurpassing beauty and a great variety of rivers and streams. I bought a raft and started exploring. When I became a professor, I decided to focus my research on water policy; what could be more important than water?

As I look back on my life, I realize how important rivers have been to me; they have shaped my life. The only "problem" with rivers is that there are not enough of them, at least the ones that are healthy, clean, free-flowing, and inviting. I truly hope that we can provide future generations with the same, or even greater, opportunities to enjoy America's waterways. Indeed, I think it is a moral imperative to pass on to future generations a world that is at least as attractive, healthy, and wild as it is in our lifetime. Restoring rivers will help us meet that goal.

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star
Share your thoughts with other customers