Qty:1
  • List Price: $70.00
  • Save: $8.46 (12%)
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Want it Tuesday, April 22? Order within and choose One-Day Shipping at checkout. Details
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Packaging may be damaged.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $2.08
Gift Card.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

A Commentary to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason Paperback – October 24, 2003

ISBN-13: 978-1403915047 ISBN-10: 1403915040 Edition: 2nd

See all 18 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from Collectible from
Paperback, October 24, 2003
$61.54
$44.99 $28.05
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student



Frequently Bought Together

A Commentary to Kant's Critique of Pure Reason + Critique of Pure Reason, Second Edition
Price for both: $93.36

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Big Spring Books
Editors' Picks in Spring Releases
Ready for some fresh reads? Browse our picks for Big Spring Books to please all kinds of readers.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 720 pages
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan; 2 edition (October 24, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1403915040
  • ISBN-13: 978-1403915047
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6 x 1.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,056,644 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"It is a classic translation: easier to read than its competitors and less cluttered with superfluous notes. An ideal translation for teaching undergraduates." -- Dr. Gary Banham, Manchester Metropolitan University

About the Author

Norman Kemp Smith (1872-1958) lectured at Princeton and was Professor of Logic and Metaphysics at the University of Edinburgh.

Sebastian Gardner is with the Department of Philosophy, Univeristy College London.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Robert Slade on October 22, 2005
Format: Paperback
Based on Chris Limmek's review Norman Kemp Smith's commentary must be excellent! Because with Kant (and all difficult works) you need to spend pages "obsessing over terminological minutiae" and you need to focus on "differentiating different lines of argument" (etc)
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 20 people found the following review helpful By JC on March 2, 1999
Format: Paperback
When this title was offered in paper, I snapped it up. This book was constantly cited by professors at the graduate level, but no students had ever seen a copy....It seemed to be "permanently" checked out by the instructors.

It's a classic commentary on one of the seminal books of western philosophy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 29, 2000
Format: Paperback
Anyone who has read this book in its totality is either a hardcore academic, or simply likes taking forty minutes a page. This kind of work is not to be confused with the light and soapy philosophies that we see in company statements, nor the glib employment of the word used by e-xtraverts on their home pages (my philosophy is...). This book looks, through ampliative means, to bridge the erstwhile gap between the ungrounded claims of arch-Rationalists,such as Liebnitz, who enable the possibility of metaphysics devoid of any 'sensible' checks (in Kants sense), and the dry sobriety of Empiricists such as Hume, whose statements regarding such things as the non a-prioricity of cause and effect; the lack of any necessary logical link between two events, leave us in a permanant probabilistic divide between what is, and what must be. However, take heart, the dry but illuminated Kant, puts man back at the centre of his own universe (and something, we know not what, at the center of man). Reading this book is not a passive activity! Knowledge of other positions in Philosophy is also going to ease the way with this volume. If you have the time and the inclination, you may never switch your brain off again! When people see it on your shelf, just say "Ahh, Hmm", then nod slowly. This way you need not back your self into any difficult conversations! (that's how I do it).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Search
ARRAY(0xa55a27e0)

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?