Common as Air: Revolution, Art, and Ownership and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.00
  • Save: $0.80 (5%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Temporarily out of stock.
Order now and we'll deliver when available.
Order now and we'll deliver when available. We'll e-mail you with an estimated delivery date as soon as we have more information. Your account will only be charged when we ship the item.
Details
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Sold by SFGoodwill
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Used - Good. Fast Shipping - Easy Returns. Your purchase creates jobs and transforms lives, thank you! =)
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Common as Air: Revolution, Art, and Ownership Paperback – October 25, 2011

ISBN-13: 978-0374532796 ISBN-10: 9780374532796 Edition: First Edition

Buy New
Price: $15.20
24 New from $3.40 42 Used from $2.38
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.20
$3.40 $2.38
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

Common as Air: Revolution, Art, and Ownership + Trickster Makes This World: Mischief, Myth and Art + The Gift: Creativity and the Artist in the Modern World
Price for all three: $40.75

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
12 Days of Kindle Book Deals
Load your library with Amazon's editors' picks, $2.99 or less each today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux; First Edition edition (October 25, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780374532796
  • ISBN-13: 978-0374532796
  • ASIN: 0374532796
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 1 x 8.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #788,673 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The question of how our cultural commons, our shared store of art and knowledge, might be made compatible with our modern age of stringent copyright laws, intellectual property rights, and restrictive patenting is taken up with considerable brio by Hyde (The Gift). Moving deftly between literary analysis, historiography, biography, and impassioned polemic, the book traces the idea of commonage from its English pastoral manifestations and pays particular attention to the American founding fathers' ideals of self-governance and civic republicanism grounded in the vision of a public realm animated by openly shared knowledge and property rights that functioned for the benefit of society rather than individuals alone. Hyde leaps nimbly, if sometimes too hurriedly, from the Ancient Mariner to the human genome project, ultimately offering a vision of human subjectivity that is fundamentally social, historical, and plural. If the book is perhaps not wholly successful in showing how we might concretely legislate for a cultural commons that would simultaneously allow for financial reward and protection from monopoly, it is nonetheless a fascinating and eminently readable attempt to coordinate commerce and creativity in what he sees as an increasingly restrictive economy of ideas.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

In his seminal book The Gift (1983), Hyde invited us to bridge the chasm between the values of the artist and the pressures of the marketplace by considering traditional economies based on reciprocal gift giving. With his latest selection, the poet–translator–cultural anthropologist–public intellectual again examines the intersection between creativity and commerce, in particular, the question of whether the fruits of creative labor can or should be privately owned. As before, Hyde’s impetus in writing is in part fear of the constraints unrestrained capitalism seems to impose on artists and cultural innovators; a considerable portion of this account is devoted to chronicling the recent corporate land grab of knowledge and the thorny bramble of intellectual property law. But this is less a manifesto of the misleadingly named copy-Left movement than it is a search for cultural consensus on which meaningful rules can be based. Finding inspiration and precedent in the concept of the commons in English land-tenure law (as well as the examples of Benjamin Franklin and Bob Dylan, among others), Hyde argues that art and ideas constitute an inherently public cultural commons that is most fertile when authors have only limited permission to enclose their works from unauthorized use. Deeply researched and powerfully felt, this book presents a compelling case for an alternate paradigm, and showcases the originality that readers cherished in The Gift. --Brendan Driscoll --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By David A. Bollier on July 25, 2012
Format: Paperback
The great virtue of Common as Air is the originality of Lewis Hyde's engaging historical exploration of the cultural commons. Contrary to the claims of one reviewer here, the commons has not been swept into the dustbin of history by capitalism. It lives a quite vibrant contemporary life in such commons as open source software, Wikipedia and Creative Commons-licensed music, images and books. The point is to understand the social dynamics of such commons (quite apart from the role of markets and government). Copyright law clearly does not appreciate these dimensions of creativity. Why exactly is so much creativity incubated in social communities, and how do property rights and markets sometimes stifle culture?

Don't be mistaken into thinking that this book is a dry policy analysis. It's a lush, provocative and highly readable meditation on human creativity, culture and property rights, especially in the context of American history. Who knew that Benjamin Franklin was not just an iconic entrepreneur, but also America's "founding pirate," an innovator deeply committed to collaborative invention and the open sharing of knowledge? Hyde tells a largely untold story about the Founders' commitment to open, shareable culture and innovation. Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By aline soules on December 9, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book explains the true meaning "commons" in the context of the public good. This is critical to an understanding of the development of copyright, both in terms of the law and also in terms of critical thinking about this complex subject. Further, the writing style is excellent. The writing is readable, clear, and direct. I recommend this book highly.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Brian Denton on December 15, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Did you know the poems of Emily Dickinson - she died one hundred and twenty four years ago - will continue to be owned by Harvard University Press until 2050? That during the 2008 presidential campaign Fox News forced John McCain to remove a commercial from YouTube featuring unauthorized footage from a Fox-moderated debate? That the RIAA filed over 20,000 lawsuits against illegal downloaders, often teenagers, for claims in excess of $9,000 a track? These are the problems with contemporary intellectual property law that Lewis Hyde seeks to solve with his new book, Common as Air: Revolution, Art, and Ownership. Relying heavily on the American founders, Hyde argues forcefully that we have moved away from the vision of the commons held by the founders and towards an increasing "market triumphalist" enclosure on the commons. This enclosure, it is argued, is stifling American arts and sciences.

The dominating theme of this book is what Hyde calls the commons. The commons is a type of property wherein multiple parties exercise rights. For Hyde, we should strive for a more robust commons and cultural output should be managed as a "collectively owned resource" where diverse individuals possess a right of action. To support this idea, Hyde relies almost exclusively upon the writings of the American founders to support this assertion. Indeed, the Constitution itself supports this view. According to that document, the project of copyright in this country is "to promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries." Hyde here quite correctly states that the primary goal of copyright in our constitutional system is to enlarge and invigorate the commons.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again