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Common Warehouse Metamodel (OMG) Paperback – December 3, 2001

ISBN-13: 978-0471200529 ISBN-10: 0471200522 Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Series: OMG (Book 17)
  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 1 edition (December 3, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0471200522
  • ISBN-13: 978-0471200529
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 7.7 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,019,723 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

"The time has come for the consumers themselves to step forward and to specify a standard for meta data semantics and meta data exchange. This book is an important first step in that direction."
-W. H. Inmon, from the Foreword

The Common Warehouse Metamodel (CWM) is rapidly gaining momentum within the data warehousing and business analysis communities, and is being incorporated into the next generation of data warehousing products and tools. This new standard for meta data interchange, which was developed by the Object Management Group (OMG), provides for seamless integration of data warehouses-- a critical ingredient for sharing data within and across organizations.

This book provides a comprehensive and authoritative overview of CWM. The authors are among the key developers of the CWM standard, and they give you an intimate understanding of how to develop and implement CWM applications for data warehousing and business analysis. They also explain how CWM relates to both established and forthcoming standards for system integration and interoperability.

The book covers everything you'll need to know to begin planning your own CWM projects, including:
* An overview of the core metamodeling technologies that CWM employs, including Meta Object Facility (MOF), Unified Modeling Language (UML), XML Meta Data Interchange (XMI), and Interface Definition Language (IDL)
* How CWM extends the OMG Metamodeling Architecture into the data warehousing and business analysis domains
* Concrete examples of how CWM is used to model various real-world data warehousing applications

The Web site contains updates to the CWM technology, descriptions of tools, and links to vendors.

About the Author

JOHN POOLE is a Distinguished Software Engineer at Hyperion Solutions and a coauthor of the CWM specification.
DAN CHANG is a member of the Database Technology Institute at IBM, a coauthor of the CWM specification, and the current chair of the CWM Revision Task Force.
DOUGLAS TOLBERT is a Consulting Engineer at Unisys Corporation and a coauthor of the CWM specification.
DAVID MELLOR is a Consulting Engineer at Oracle Corporation and a coauthor of the CWM specification.

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Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By David C. Hay on June 9, 2002
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Ok, I am a known heretic. I am not impressed by the CWM model. It is oriented toward the object-oriented implementation of a tool for metadata exchange, not toward representing the things business people would be looking for in a meta data repository.
This book is better than the on-line specification at describing the model--which was really incomprehensible--but this is at the expense of completeness. Definitions are not available for all classes and the ones that are are not clear (to me at least). The relationships are barely defined at all.
In fairness, the model is so complex that it may not be possible to describe clearly to anyone not deeply immersed in the language of object-orientation. The team of authors is further hampered by its use of UML. The notation does not permit a complete inheritance tree to be portrayed in a diagram if the diagram is of less than the entire model. Two classes may be related, but you can't see this because the relationship is between great grandparents, shown on a different page.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Frank Carver on September 6, 2003
Format: Paperback
I'll say at the start that this is not my kind of book. I prefer books which are useful, enlightening or both. This didn't seem to be either. From page 3: "The mission of this book is to provide a single, coherent, and comprehensive overview of the OMG's Common Warehouse Metamodel, which is easy to read.". It may be slightly easier to read than the raw specification, but it's a lot less useful. The most telling point is further down the same page where it admits to really being just an introduction to a forthcoming "Warehouse Metamodel Developers Guide".
For an overview, the book is really short on examples. It's got lots of vague UML diagrams and pretty pictures like you might see on a powerpoint slide, but not a single worked example to show how all the buzzwords and technologies might actually fit together. I also have great problems with their use of UML as a language to actually specify data models, processes and so on. For me UML is a tool to help express intentions to people, not supply details to processing software, but this book seems to ignore the difference.
If you know nothing about meta-modelling, and want the sort of information you can get from the slides of a conference presentation, this may be a useful book. If you want to understand the details, or (gosh) actually get a job done, then this book will just frustrate you.
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5 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 15, 2002
Format: Paperback
By far, the finest presentation of a new (to me) concept I have seen in a long time. Structure of book is ideal, with a strong writing style, fantastic use of graphics, and examples that aid in understanding. I knew virtually nothing about CWM before reading this book -- I know a good deal now. Excellent, understandable writing style combined with superb technical information...a definite "stew" for the CWM-hungry mind. Bon appetit!
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 20, 2002
Format: Paperback
The overall organization of the book: its introduction of topics, clear and concise definitions and illustrative examples made for easy reading, even for concepts with which I was unfamiliar. The structure, content and motivation for the CWM classes and packages were clearly presented as was their use, interaction, extensibility and applicability through thoughtfully constructed examples.
A must read for managers, system architects and software developers grappling with data warehouse integration projects.
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