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3.4 out of 5 stars8
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on October 6, 2010
Something needs to be said to counterbalance the 1-star review of this book by someone not even in the communication discipline. This book is not your typical communication theory book, in the best possible way. This book is not a laundry list of outdated communication theories. It is a metaphorical journey through many views on communication. Significant authors in the communication (WITHOUT THE "S") field talk about how they "see" communication. This book is a fabulous text for exploring a multitude of views on what communication is. The authors and editors leave the decision of what view is most appropriate for you, up to you. A very nice book overall.
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on September 13, 2012
While I did not purchase this item off of Amazon, I too wish to counterbalance the horrendous one-star reviews it has garnered. This text was presented by a professor as primarily intended for graduate courses, but in offering it to undergraduates in a upper level communication theory course along side Em Griffins text, there is great potential for great shifts in understanding for students. The chapters all offer perspectives which suggest different ways to view the most basic purpose or vehicle for communication as a whole. While some- like social identity and storytelling- primarily offer divergent paths that communication can take to further enrich itself, others- like translation and failure- present standpoints than could and should be held by all conscious communicators. Personal favorites included autoethnography, storytelling, and above all: transcendence. This is a very valuable text which can serve anyone from undergraduate to grad students to academically interested minds from other fields faithfully if you open your mind to the notions the authors offer.
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on February 22, 2015
As far as scholarly writing in the field of communication goes, this book is a gem. Most of the various authors attempt to actually communicate rather than get bogged down in professor-speak, which is so common in academic writing. It was interesting to see authors take a stand for and against various theories in the field. I have to see this as a step in the right direction for a field so abounding in noncommunication.
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on February 25, 2016
Informational text. The author of the Storytelling chapter is enamored with the sound of their own voice. Most of the book is condescending and pretentious, but then again, most Communication scholars think they are geniuses and beyond reproach.
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on June 17, 2013
I had to have this book for a class. It was very interesting in that people approach communication in many different ways.
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on September 18, 2014
I like this book. It helped me in my Specialist program. It helped me understand the art of communicating.
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on June 22, 2011
Absolute drivel. Here's the opening shot from the chapter "Communication as Communicability" by Briankle ( a male name) Chang: "How does one begin to question Communication? More fundamentally, how can one not begin?" It heads straight downhill from there. On the up side, page 103 has perhaps the most spirited collection of invented academic terminology that I've seen since undergraduate days, so if you're a collector of that sort of thing, this text is a must-have. Other than that, purposeless. The contributors to this collection of essays are stealing their paychecks.
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on June 27, 2010
I bought this book for my Education Specialist class, and it was useless. But, that's the school's fault. Maybe if you're actually a Communications major it might be more helpful, but the book sure does repeat itself a lot. Also, lots of "fillers" are used to share simple ideas.
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