Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.99
  • Save: $2.67 (18%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Good | Details
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Minimal damage to cover and binding. Pages show light use. With pride from Motor City. All books guaranteed. Best Service, Best Prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Communion: The Female Search for Love Paperback – December 24, 2002


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.32
$8.14 $4.80
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

Communion: The Female Search for Love + All About Love: New Visions + The Will to Change: Men, Masculinity, and Love
Price for all three: $35.51

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (December 24, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060938293
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060938291
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.6 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (23 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #51,941 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

While feminism may have changed boardrooms, it didn't make much headway in bedrooms, argues philosopher/writer hooks. Women have made progress in regard to social empowerment, but the quest for emotional density for love has remained elusive. Why are men still so emotionally unsatisfying? Because, hooks argues, "patriarchal thinking has socialized males to believe that their manhood is affirmed when they are emotionally withholding." Patriarchy valorizes power and assigns it to men, and devalues nurturing and labels it feminine. Thus, young postfeminist women find themselves with "nothing to show" from their newly won equality but a double shift of work: first the paid job, then the physical and emotional homework of their relationship with their man. Still, as feminists of hooks's generation reach midlife, they may find it easier to rethink these terms of engagement, to risk changing things. The first step, she says, is self-love accepting one's body and soul just the way it is. Without such acceptance, women cannot escape the domination-submission dynamic. Even then, in this patriarchal universe finding love with another person may require some creativity. Hooks explores romantic friendships, lesbian loves and "circles of love" (which allow for committed bonds that extend beyond one partnership). A life with no coupling, but "a more authentic relationship between self and world," may also be satisfying. Twenty-something women who've embraced the highly problematic "bitch persona" Elizabeth Wurtzel has written of may sneer at hooks's affirming style, but older women, particularly those raising girls themselves, will find much to ponder here. (Feb. 1)Forecast: This should satisfy those looking for an alternative Valentine's Day gift for the leftist/feminist woman in their life.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

It's not true that you can love too much, social critic hooks warns women. Just let yourself go.
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Bell Hooks is a cultural critic, feminist theorist, and writer. Celebrated as one of our nation's leading public intellectual by The Atlantic Monthly, as well as one of Utne Reader's 100 Visionaries Who Could Change Your Life, she is a charismatic speaker who divides her time among teaching, writing, and lecturing around the world. Previously a professor in the English departments at Yale University and Oberlin College, hooks is now a Distinguished Professor of English at City College and the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. She is the author of more than seventeen books, including All About Love: New Visions; Remembered Rapture: The Writer at Work; Wounds of Passion: A Writing Life; Bone Black: Memories of Girlhood; Killing Rage: Ending Racism; Art on My Mind: Visual Politics; and Breaking Bread: Insurgent Black Intellectual Life. She lives in New York City.

Customer Reviews

This book is the best out of the love trilogy.
mp541
Socialized to yearn for male approval, women are often taught from an early age that love is essential to her own self-worth.
Jennifer M. Ortiz
Her ideas stimulate intelligent and loving thought, conversation, and action.
rainqueen

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Lawrence W. Prichard on March 6, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I have read journal articles by bell hooks, but this is the first book I have read of hers. It won't be my last book by her.
Communion: The Female Search for Love is part memoir, part challenge, and very thoughtprovoking.
One aspect I liked best was her debunking of the myth of "women who love too much." Another center of focus is the effect of gainful employment on the perceptions of love.
Her language is direct and clear, but not simplistic.
This is a very good book, and one that I hope will be widely read and discussed.
Even though her subtitle is "The Female Search for Love," men can learn from this worthwhile book, if they have the courage to read it.
This might be an excellent choice for a book group.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 28 people found the following review helpful By BigHeart on February 19, 2003
Format: Paperback
Communion is a discussion and legitimization of the pursuit of love from a mid-life feminist perspective. Hooks believes that the desire to understand how love works is a serious, important, and ultimately joyful life-work activity that should be studied and taught. The big question she attempts to answer is how to "find, keep, and make love despite the power of patriarchy."
The best part of this book is that Hooks always tells the truth as she sees it. There is no glossing over or contriving to make a point. Sometimes her language is sexually explicit and blunt. She explains love from the perspective of her own personal life experience and through intelligent observation and study of our culture and gender practices. The impact of the feminist movement is woven through her assessment. Unlike many other feminists, however, Hook's voice is not militant.
There is only one caution. The ever-present temptation for Hooks and for all of us is to find excuses why we cannot find love or be loving. From the ego's perspective, there is always a so-called justifiable reason for the rejection of another. In this case, the justifiable reason is patriarchy. However, unconditional love means that we undo the hate inour minds and extend love no matter what distressing disguise is presented to us.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By rainqueen on January 19, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Simply wonderful. Covers not only romantic, familial, and friendly relationships but focuses on the heart of the matter: women loving and respecting ourselves. Choosing appropriate relationships and nurturing them is only one part of that more important aim. bell hooks urges us to focus on being complete within ourselves - difficult for all women in our culture, particularly so for women of color.
Her observations are wise. Her grasp of history is absolute. Her ideas stimulate intelligent and loving thought, conversation, and action. Read this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Naoki on September 12, 2004
Format: Paperback
And for a reader who is not hip to feminist thought or lit, this is a good soft entry. I enjoyed bell hooks analogies and statements regarding that women do seek love in so many ways and her most important point was that many women do not receive non-sexual love from men, which is necessary for balance in life, thus forcing them to seek it in so many other ways.

This book encouraged me to read and understand other bell hooks books that are phenomenal. I respect hooks for offering a wide spectrum on emotions, and reality
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By mp541 on June 13, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I have to admit that I was both surprised and pleased by this body of work. This book is the best out of the love trilogy. She challenges women to dare to love beyond the romantic/sex paradigm. Also, she is brutally honest about how hard it is to find a partner who is truly unshackled from the chains of domination. Kudos to bell for writing on a very complicated topic: love.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By thesavvybamalady VINE VOICE on April 16, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This is about the second work that I have read by Ms. hooks, and I wasn't disappointed. In this work, she talks about the things females do for love, and how it costs us. She talked about her mother, who would gang up with her dad and belittle her for reading, then outside of the father's presence, she would praise her for reading, and try to placate her when the damage was already done. or when she was with her partner and whenever the partner had a good employment opportunity, the author would willingly go, but when the author got a similar opportunity of her own, the partner was unwilling to go. Personally, I feel we as women sacrifice a lot in the name of love. We are usually the first to change, to adapt, to mold, and go along with the program. To me that is not love. I feel that Ms. hooks wrote the book from a feminist and womanist standpoint, and her points were valid. Amazon.com said that this book would make a great Valentine's present for someone single. I agree. Get this book and grow.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Bee Marie on March 3, 2003
Format: Paperback
bell hooks blew me away with All About Love and Salvation. Communion, however, left me wanting more. Although it was written in the typical bell hooks fashion -- I love her writing style, Communion didn't have the same passion, spirit and overall power that the previous two books had. I did like the way she weaved her own self into the topic. By doing so, she makes the reader feel closer to her and helps them relate better to their own search for love.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 18 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 2, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I consider myself to be a huge bell hooks fan, but this book wasn't doing it for me. Usually, I can reading her cover to cover in a day and a half, but this time I find myself just barely picking through this. It's odd that her book "Salvation" on blacks and love was more interesting and only half the size of this tome. bell prides herself on bringing up race, class, and gender issues simultaneously, yet race and class drop to the wayside here. (To her credit, age and sexual orientation is brought up often.) I think readers unfamiliar with her work are going to be put off by her constant pointing to patriarchy and her continual assessment of feminism as a key aspect in women's search for love. Usually, bell has something brilliant to say in every chapter, and this time, I can't quote much that made me say, "Ahh! Good point!" bell can't really write bad books, it's just that this one did not blow me away like her previous texts.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?